September 2, 1864

Macomb Journal

The Chicago Convention.

            We have no time this week to comment upon the actions or resolutions of the Chicago, Secesh Convention, which assembled in that city on Monday last. The notorious characters of the personages there assembled in solemn conclave to save the country, is too well known to require any extended notice at our hands.

Their platform – if it can be designated by such a title – is such as would have been expected to emanate from Richmond in the early and palmy days of secession. They have indirectly declared their intention to fight for the defeat of Mr. Lincoln, and while appearing before the American people as the advocates of peace, they proposed to make it on terms to suit themselves, and in direct opposition to the will of the majority.

We can conceive of no baser mode of gulling the people into their support, than the one they have adopted, and it behooves every man to call his thinking faculties into operation, before he concludes to support the nominees of a party who has practiced nothing but deception as far back as our memory extends.

Whoever their nominee may be, he is obliged to war against the Union, except upon the same platform which was to carry the rebel Breckinridge into power. Forsaking principle, country and everything which tends to make a patriot, they are but true Bardolphs, who, when told of their deaths, will exclaim:

“Would I were with them where some’er they be – either in Heaven or in Hell.”

We desire that all should remember the promises made in ’56, when that old arch-traitor Buchanan was elevated to the Presidential chair through chicanery and fraud. Many good men now unite with the majority in denouncing the O. P. F., but the same men advocating the same principles, are now the head and front of the Copperhead party, and as they have so often succeeded in elections by the game of “brag and bluff,” have adopted the same method, only on a more extended scale.

The example set by the hordes of traitors at the South, is now being followed up their accomplices in the North, and while we are resting in the fancied security; while many, very many, cannot be aroused to a sense of the danger which threatens our perpetuity as a government, these home traitors – under the auspices of the Chicago leaders – are arming and drilling to resist the constituted authorities of the land. We are an alarmist, but these facts are so palpable, that he who runs can read, and he who reads can not but understand.

The Eagle, – which is the fountainhead of treason in this county – is prepared to resort to any means to defeat the Union party, and is so lost to all patriotism, all love of country and every principle which constitutes a man, that nothing is too low or degrading for [fold] to diffuse among a community when their [fold] peculiar views and party predilections are to be advanced. It is a matter of vital import to the safety of our rights, that when a small party in the North is struggling for the Southern Confederacy, to assume control of the Federal Government, and to circumscribe and destroy our National institutions, that the people should rise in their might and crush with one powerful blow all opposition to our legally constituted rulers.

P. S. We stop the press to announce that “the great GUYASTICUTUS are loose.” Gen. Geo. B. McClellan and Geo. H. Pendleton were nominated by the Peace Convention – on Wednesday last. We wait patiently to see how they will reconcile McClellan’s war record with their peace platform.

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          → The people have met with trouble wherever their rulers, influenced more by a wicked ambition than by moral principles, have assumed the right to regulate matters not pertinent to their jurisdiction. – Eagle.

True, and the democratic party is a dead example of this assumption to regulate matters for the success of party, and ignoring the rights of the people. Jeff. Davis, Jas. Buchanan, C. L. Vallandingham and those who have been identified with their clique, are the rulers, to whom we are indebted for all our present Mr. Lincoln of “wicked ambition” in enforcing the laws, because forsooth, their power has departed never to return. This is an enlightened age Mr. Eagle, and such stuff won’t go down.

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          → Gov. Yates has issued his proclamation calling for a regiment of volunteers for State service. It is said the regiment is to be used to enforce the draft, and for the arrest of obnoxious individuals. This is but commencement. – Eagle.

We should like to know of the Eagle, who says this regiment is to be raised for the purpose he states, except the Chicago Times? Even were it so – which we most emphatically deny – would it not be but a counter movement to protect Union voters at the polls? Is not the Copperhead party organized into armed and secret societies for the purpose of intimidating those who choose to vote the Lincoln ticket? No loyal man need fear Martial law. – They claim to be good, loyal, law-abiding citizens; if so, they are as safe from martial law in Illinois, as they are from the rebel bullets of Hood or Lee.

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ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.

From the 78th Regiment.

Field Hospital, 2nd Division 14th A. C. near Atlanta, Ga.
August 10, 1864.

            Alas, for human expectations. Here I am at the Hospital again numbered among the long list of patients unfit for duty. When I wrote you about the 1st inst., I spoke of returning to the regiment in two or three days. Well, I went, although I knew I was weak, and not exactly well; but on reaching the regiment, I soon became convinced it was not the place for me just yet. Our Surgeon’s were of the same opinion, and yielding to the force of circumstances, I took the back track, and I suppose I will have to serve out my allotted time at the Hospital; but whether it will be long enough to run into weeks, or short enough to be counted only by days, I will be better able to tell you next Christmas. My complaints are not of a serious nature, but are such as will require a little time and careful nursing to remedy.

Our regiment in the past few days has suffered considerable in wounded and some few killed. Sylvester McFall and John S. Mayhugh, of Co. C, were each wounded in an arm four or five days since and have been sent to Chattanooga. They were both severe flesh wounds, but luckily no bones factured. On the 6th inst. Marshal I. Cline of the same company was struck with a piece of shell in the abdomen and died the same night in great agony. At the breaking out of the war, Mr. Cline was residing in a secesh district in Missouri, but being loyal to the core, as soon as he could complete his arrangements he moved his family to Blandinville, the place of his former residence, and then enlisted in the 78th regiment. He was a good soldier, and from what I learn of him, a very worthy man. Jesse Warner, of Co. C, and James Ellis of Co. I, were both slightly wounded from the bursting of the same shell which killed Cline. Warner was struck in the head, and Ellis on the under part of the knee. They are both here at the Hospital, and will probably be unfit for duty for two or three weeks. Day before yesterday there were four wounded men brought in here from our regiment, viz: Lewis Achbaugh of Co. D, severe flesh wound in right arm; Sergeant A. Abbott, same co., wound in left hand; John Buskirk, co. K, flesh wound in right arm; Corp. Peter S. Caunnery, co. G, wounded by a piece of shell in bowels. Caunnery’s wound is severe, but with care he may recover.

Col. Van Vleck has been on the sick list for two or three weeks, but is getting better. Michael Baymiller, of co. I, has been laid up here at the hospital for several days with sore eyes, but I am glad to notice he is rapidly improving.

Dr. W. H. Githens, of our regiment, has charge of the wounded in one of the wards at this hospital, and it gives me pleasure to note that there is no Surgeon here more faithful and industrious in the care of his patients than is Dr. Githens. He appears to take a special care in each case, and is careful to observe that they receive all the attention and care they require.

It is a very common thing for patients at a hospital to find a great deal of fault with their treatment, and to note particularly that nothing is done right. – For my own part I try to make all allowances, and am truly thankful for all the mercies and favors I receive. But while others are finding fault with everything, I propose to express my displeasure only upon one matter – and that is the loose system which appears to prevail in the receiving of patients at the hospital. The first time I was brought to the hospital there were some six or eight of us unloaded from the ambulance in front of the hospital ten’s, and there were lay in the hot sun for fifteen or twenty minutes before we received any attention. When I came back two evenings since I was in company with four others from our regiment, and we were unloaded in like manner, and the ambulance was driven away. We patiently sat upon the ground, knowing it was the duty of somebody to look after us and assign us our proper places. After waiting as patiently as we could for nearly half an hour, I concluded to go myself and ascertain whether the hospital was closed against further admission, or whether somebody was derelict in duty. The Surgeons were very busy just then attending to a fresh load of wounded which had been brought in, and I concluded not to disturb any of them, but observing a very benevolent looking Chaplain who appears to be stationed at the hospital, standing by looking on at the amputation of a poor fellows leg. I concluded that he was my man. After getting his attention I told him that there were five sick men who had been brought in, and who were lying out upon the bare ground, and I thought as night was setting in they ought to be looked after. I failed to raise the sympathy in this mans breast that I had supposed I could, and to cut short my story I have only to say that those sick men were obliged to lay out in the bushes all night without any food, or any attention only such as they were able to render each other.

Aug. 12. – Have an opportunity today to send this letter. Col. Carter VanVleck was brought to the hospital last evening mortally wounded with a bullet in the head. He only left us yesterday noon to return to the regiment. He is still alive, but little or no prospect of recovery. A gloom pervades the regiment. He was a man of many noble qualities. Capt. Ruddell, of Co. B, is also here with a severe wound in his head.

J. K. M.

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137th Regt. Ill. Vol.

Camp Memphis, Aug. 22, ’64.

          We had quite a battle yesterday. The rebels attacked us about half past three in the morning. They came in on our Regiment first, as we were the farthest out on the Hernando Road. They were all through our camp before we knew anything about it. They captured the pickets and came in upon us with a yell. After awhile the Major got us in line of battle, then we gave them a volley or two and had to fall back – as they were peppering us with grape and canister, not over twenty-five steps from us. We kept falling back, giving them volley after volley, until some of the other regt’s came to our support. We fought them about two hours, our reg’t. alone, as the other regt’s were in town, and it is about three miles to the city. At one time our regt. Was in Preacher Hawley’s yard, and had quite a little fight there. Mr. Hawley was out there talking to the boy’s. Some of the boys in our Company carried a wounded rebel in Mr. H’s house. The fight began about half-past three, and lasted until three or four in the afternoon. When we came back to our tents, in the afternoon, the dead rebels were laying thick on our camp ground. While we were fighting them, when they first attacked us, it was so dark we could not see them, but had to guess where they were; which we did pretty well, as the dead horses are lying around everywhere; there is two lying dead in our company quarters. The rebels took all the rubber blankets that they could get ahold of and some woolen ones. The boys all drew new clothing the day before; I drew a new pair of pants and some socks, but the rebels didn’t open my Knapsack; all they got from me, was my rubber blanket. Some of the boys lost all they had. – There was a sick boy in our company, that could not get out of his bunk. They took him out of his bunk, to the front of the tent and shot him through the head, and also ran a bayonet through his body, “he was murdered in cold blood.” I was over to the College grounds this morning and saw five dead rebels laying behind trees, each one had a tree to himself, and they were all shot through the head. I guess the rebels thought they would make a dash in here and capture Gens. Washburn and Hurlbut and release some of the prisoners that we had here, but the prisoners had been sent up the river the day before. They come very near getting Gen. Washburn, but he made his escape. My tent has got four bullet holes in it. Last night about twelve o’clock, we were called out again, the rebels were coming in again. We got up and marched about a mile to support a battery, and slept on our arms the rest of the night, and this morning came back to camp. There are men detailed this morning to bury the dead. At some of the houses around our camp, they set a supper for the rebels, and when our Reg’t. came in the fight, the Major went over to the houses and told them to have supper ready for him and the rest of the officers in our Regt., and told the boys to forage all they wanted to. Col. Roach was slightly wounded in the back, by a spent ball. There was two men killed in our Company. Thad. Houston was wounded in the leg; the ball went in at the knee and come out in the fleshy part of the thigh. Surgeon Dunn said that he wasn’t badly wounded. I have not seen him, he is down town in the Hospital. I think he was the only one wounded in our Company. I believe there were 10 or 12 of our Company taken prisoners. Ed. Brooking of Macomb, and a boy from Colchester named Charley Patrick. The rest that were taken were from other towns. Capt. Veatch was down in the Hospital, his sword was hanging up in his tent, the rebels took that, and also the Lieuts. Dress coat and his best pants, and several other things. Most of the officers lost nearly everything they had. I am detailed to take charge of a squad of men and report at Head Quarters immediately. I don’t know what for, so I must bring this to a close. Dr. Dunn was taken prisoner, they took him about three miles and put him in charge of the sick and wounded, when he made his escape.

Fred. L. Lancey.

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            The rebels are in our front – their Canadian allies in our rear, their copperhead allies in our midst – and their Indian allies on our right flank. Loyal men of the Republic are you alive to the exigency and necessities of the hour? If you shut your eyes upon the crisis, or seeing it, treat it with unconcern, what hope is there for your country, your city, your property, the house over your head, or the children at your hearthstone?

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Carter Van Vleck.

            Death has found another shining mark. Another brave and dashing patriot has fallen a free-will offering on his country’s altar, in the perilous field of battle: and another patriotic hearth is left in sadness. Col. Carter Van Vleck is no more, wounded in the brain by a random shot from the enemy before Atlanta, on the 11th inst., he lingered until about the 23d inst., when his spirit in great tranquility ascended to his God.

Col. Van Vleck was a native of Hamilton, Madison county New York, and was at his death 34 years of age. He studied law at Springfield, Illinois, and practiced as an attorney at Beardstown in this State some years, from whence he removed to this place nine or ten years ago.

A man of easy and refined address, of humane, kind-hearted, generous and manly emotions, he readily won the affections of both old and young; and his death has caused almost universal mourning. Col. Van Vleck possessed an easy flowing oratory, which rendered him one of our most impressive public speakers, and the way was fast opening for him to assume a place amongst our most prominent men. His morals were pure and unsullied and his integrity unquestioned. He was, for some years before his death, a consistent devoted member and elder of the Presbyterian Church, where he had warm friends, amongst them the young and adult members.

But the closing years of his short and useful life were spent in the immediate military service of his country, amidst the stirring scenes of the great national struggle now in progress. When others periled their lives he was not one to set by unmoved. In 1862 he was appointed by Gov. Yates a Lieutenant Colonel, of the 78th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, and he was afterwards promoted to the place of Colonel in the same regiment. As a military man Col. Van Vleck has exhibited powers highly gratifying to his many friends, and in seeming contrast with his amiable and gentle manners. On the battle-field he was prompt and daring; eager to divide the labor, the danger and the risks with all around. – Although seriously wounded on the battle-field of Chickamauga, he rejoined his regiment with his arm in a sling, and sought not honorable retirement.

But he has at last fallen, and we will greet no more in our streets his noble, manly and generous countenance, and will hear his soft and soothing voice no more.

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            Casualties in the 137th Regiment. – The following is the list of casualties in Co’s C and I, 137th Ill. Inft., on the morning of Aug. 21st, at Memphis, Tennessee:

Co. C – Killed – James Poling – Wounded – Orderly Sergeant Thaddeus Huston, leg, severe; Davis N. Rogers, bowels, dead. Captured – Sergt. James H. Drais; Private Edward S Brooking, died on the way, Bailey Cozzard, Milton Eakle, Jacob Kious, slightly wounded; John F McCord, Charles V Patrick, James Thompson, Prestly Williams.

Co I – Killed – L W Porter. Wounded Serg’t J A Kyle, thigh; Privates Ulast West, head; D L Wells, head; J R Gentry, thigh; Thos Jones, leg, slight.

Prisoners – J P McDonald, paroled; Corp. J R Dawson, Privt. Jas Bennie, J W Couch, still in hands of rebs; J Pennington, leg; N M Wilson, arm; W B Radecan, D L Wycoff, S F Sanders, Dave Chambers, J L Lemaster, A L Barnes, D A Davis, Benj. Montague, A Sherman, J C Arnold.

Killed, 1; wounded 5; prisoners, 16; still in hands of rebs, 13; total 22. This is just one fourth of our company.

C. D. Hendrickson, O. S. Co. I.

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            From the 16th. – We have received letters from this regiment dated the 21st, and as no mention is made of the death of the officers reported killed in our last, we feel inclined to doubt the correctness of the report.

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            School Notice. – The Public Schools of the City will open on Monday the 19th of this month.

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            From the Front. – Col. Lew. Waters of the gallant 84th, arrived at home on Saturday last from near Atlanta. The Col. comes home to recuperate his health, which the arduous duties of the present campaign has impaired to a considerable extent. He brings us the cheering intelligence, that Gen. Sherman’s operations are of the most satisfactory character, and his final success, merely a question of time. – He saw, and conversed with Col. Van Vleck on the 20th, and says the opinions of the Surgeons are not at all favorable to the Col.’s recovery. He was wounded on the 11th, the ball entering near the forehead, glancing upward and could not be extracted. We welcome Col. Waters to his home once more but regret he cannot he with us to fight the political campaign through.

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            Death of Ed. S. Brooking. – We see, in a list of casualties of the 137th. In the Memphis fight on the 21st ult., that Mr. E. S. Brooking was captured by the enemy and afterwards died from exhaustion. His numerous friends will be pained to learn of his death.

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            County Fair. – The County Fair commences on Wednesday next the 7th inst., when it is to be expected everybody and the rest of mankind will turn out. It is the desire of the officers to make this the best exhibition of the kind ever before held in Macomb, and it can only be done by a hearty response from the people of the county. The prospects for a large turn out is a very flattering one, and we have no doubt the expectations of the managers will be realized.

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            Thanks. – To the fair unknown, who so kindly favored us with a box of delicious Grapes last week, we beg leave to return our thanks, and beg leave to proclaim “to all whom it may concern;” that we are open for the reception of all favors of that kind, at all times.

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            Still Another. – The “Vets” of the old regiments, whose time has expired, are returning every day – the latest arrival we notice in John Anderson, a son of James Anderson, Esq. He looks remarkably well, and as though he could stand three years more easy.

Joe Low, another brave Macomb boy, has also returned to receive the congratulations of his friends and acquaintances. Joe has grown tall and stout, and looks every inch a soldier.

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          Personal. – We notice the arrival, on Wednesday morning of Sergt. Major Hendricks, of the 78th. It will be recollected that Mr. Hendricks was wounded in the foot some time last Spring. We are happy to state that he has recovered from the effects of his wound, and that he will return to his regiment shortly.

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            Lost. – Jim Gash has lost a tuning fork, and any one finding the same will please return it to him at the Dry Goods Store of A. J. Davis, where they will be amply rewarded by the thanks of Jim, and an opportunity to purchase a cheap bill of goods from that popular salesman.

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            The Chicago Museum. – Those of our readers who visit Chicago, should not fail to go to Col. Wood’s Museum, on Randolph street, between Dearborn and Clark streets. The attractions at that popular place of resort are numerous and instructive, among which we will name the “Trial of Christ,” a collection of wax statuary unequaled in America. Seen by gas-light it forms one of the most superb sights that can be imagined. The Col. will have, in a short time, a wax figure of the “Chicago Beauty,” which will be worth going far to see. There are thousands of other curiosities there, and any one visiting the Museum will not go away dissatisfied. Lovers of Nature, Art, the marvelous, or the wonderful, all will find something to feast the sight with. Be sure and visit Col. Wood’s Chicago Museum while you are at Chicago.

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            Improving. – Watkins & Co., not content with keeping already the largest stock of Groceries in this City, deem their present extensive storeroom too small for their growing trade, and also wishing to improve the appearance of the city, are putting up a large three story brick building on the southeast corner of the square, opposite their present location. When finished their building will be an ornament, not only to that part of the square but to the city.

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            Great Show. – The only real Circus – S. B. Howe’s European Circus – will exhibit in this city on the 10th. The press every where speaks of this show as being the only one traveling that is fully up to the mark. If you want to see genuine acting go to Howe’s circus on the 10th.

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            → In these times of high prices, it is well to remember that children can be supplied with shoes for less than half the usual annual cost, by wearing Metal-Tipped Shoes, to say nothing of stockings destroyed and health endangered by wet feet, arising from the childlike habit of wearing out their shoes at the toes first.

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Township Quotas.

Hdq’s. P M’s Office,
Ninth District.

Mt. Sterling, Ill., Aug. 29 ’64.
W. E. Withrow, Esq. Macomb, Ill.

            Dr Sir: — The following is the quota of the several towns in McDonough Co., of which fact, please notify the people of said towns, in order that the men may be raised without draft, to wit:

No. 44 Eldorado         .           .           20 men.

“   45  Industry,         .           .           2 “

“     46 Bethel,             .           .           14 “

“   47   Lamoine,         .           .           21 “

“   49 Chalmers,          .           .           9 “

“ 50   Scotland,         .           .           23 “

“   51   New Salem,     .           .          19 “

“   52   Mound ,           .           .           23 “

“   54   Emmett,          .           .           17 “

“   55   Hire,                .           .           22 “

“   57   Sciota,             .           .           14 “

“   58   Walnut Grove,   .       .           25 “

Total Required            .           .           209 “

            The following Towns are in excess and consequently not liable to draft, to wit:

Tennessee        town.               42 men ahead,

Blandinsville   “                      7          do

Macomb          “                      94        do

Prairie City      “                      25        do

            Yours, Respectfully, B. F. Westlake, Capt. and Pro. Mar. 9th Dist. Ill.

August 27, 1864

Macomb Eagle

County Convention and Mass Meeting.

            We trust the Democrat and other conservative men of McDonough county will not fail to attend the county mass meeting on the 3rd of September. It is designed to make the first grand meeting to ratify the Chicago nominations for President and Vice President, and the people who desire Peace and Union instead of War and Disunion should turn out in their strength and make such a demonstration as will carry dismay to the ranks of the negro shoddy party. The convention to nominate for county officers will be held the same day, and will probably commence at 10 o’clock in the forenoon, so that its work may be finished in time for all to attend the speaking. Mr. Ross, our candidate for Congress, and a number of other distinguished speakers, are confidently expected to be in attendance. Rally out Democrats, and let us begin the campaign earnestly and effectively.

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Nomination of L. W. Ross.

            The convention which met at Beardstown on Tuesday last nominated the Hon. L. W. Ross as the Democratic candidate for congress, in the 9th district. The convention was largely attended, and its proceedings were marked with entire harmony and good feeling. Three candidates were before the convention, Mr. Ross, Mr. Archer of Pike, and Judge Bailey of McDonough; pending the first ballot the two latter were withdrawn, and then the nomination of Mr. Ross was make by acclamation. This was an appropriate mark of respect and confidence in a faithful public servent. – Mr. Ross in a short speech, accepted the nomination, and pledged himself to use his best exertions to aid in restoring peace and Union to the States. Mr. R. intends to make a through canvass of the district, and we bespeak for him an impartial hearing on the part of the people.

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            → Gov. Yates has issued his proclamation calling for a regiment of volunteers for State service. It is said the regiment is to be used to enforce the draft, and for the arrest of obnoxious individuals. This is but the commencement. Before November Illinois will be ruled by martial law, and will be as completely enslaved as is Kentucky to-day.

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            → Colonel Jacques, an abolition parson, and Gilmore, an abolition author, went to Richmond to arrange terms of peace with the Confederacy. Nobody sent them, they carried no propositions of pacification, and had no authority to accept any. These two men report that Davis will accept no peace without a recognition of the independence of the South; and upon the strength of this the abolitionists are everywhere triumphantly assuring us that the war must go on because Davis will not have peace. All this is very flimsy. The utterances of those self-constituted plenipotentiaries are no more importance than the utterances of any refugee, deserter, or other individual from the South. They did not communicate officially with the Confederate government, and consequently their conclusions have no more force than those of mere individuals. Their report may be correct, or it may not; it is not a matter of the slightest importance in either respect. Two individuals from the North hold a conversation with two individuals in the South, and now the administration journals are claiming that this conversation should be accepted as conclusive evidence that the South will accept nothing less than independence.

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Abolition Outrages in Fulton County.

            On Saturday morning last the Democratic hall in the town of Avon, in this county, was set on fire and burnt to ashes. It was located on the second floor of a large wagon manufactory, and was owned, we are informed, by a Democrat. A correspondent writing from Avon says there is no doubt in the minds of the people there that the Abolitionists were the instigators of this, the first [?] act. $500 reward will be given for the apprehension of the incendiary.

While the meeting was in progress at Cuba, on Saturday evening last, some fiend entered the hotel stable and cut a harness belonging to Mr. Edward Sayre; the villain no doubt supposed the harness belonged to Mr. James, as they were on the horse which this gentleman drove there. A bridle belonging to Dr. Hull’s harness was also taken. A horse belonging to Mr. Horace Loveland was taken and rode about five miles, — and Mr. L. not finding him until Saturday evening. Several other minor outrages were committed which is unnecessary to enumerate. [?] will be paid for positive proof against the villain who committed these outrages.

On Sunday last the station house in which is the store of Mr. James C. WIlcoxen, at Bryan station, in this county, was set on fire, but the fire was quenched in time to prevent serious damage. Mr. Wilcoxen is a Democrat, and, we believe, is the owner of station building. $600 reward will be paid for the arrest of the incendiary.

On Sunday last the lead pipe belonging to the tank at Bryant station was stolen.

We have no hesitancy in pronouncing these outrages the work of Abolitionists. Dick Yates has said that Democrats have no rights which a negro was bound to respect, and his satellites throughout this country have given utterance to like expressions, while intelligent, law-abiding dupes of their person carry into practice what they only mean to preach. We would say to our friends that, when you have certain knowledge that these outrages were committed by miscegens (and who doubt it?) it is your duty to retaliate in kind. Abolitionists must taught that Democrats have rights which must be respected. – Fulton Democrat.

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            → No great reform was ever accomplished – no great evil eradicated by violence. History is repeating itself, and judging from the past, future historians will report that the crowning failure of the 19th century was the abolition crusade against slavery. The lesson of this war will be, as [?] of allowing has been, that great moral evils cannot be eradicated by the sword; but that the hope of the world lies in toleration – in bearing up evil for the sake of good. The prophet of Israel was taught that it was not by the sword nor the fire, nor the earthquake that the nation could be reformed, but by the still small voice, “and he covered his face with his mantle.” Let our abolition preachers of fire and sword follow the example.

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            Emmet Township. – The Democrats of Emmet Township will hold a meeting at Union School house, on Friday, September 2nd, at 2 o’clock p. m., for the purpose of appointing delegates to the county convention.

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Candidates.

            We are authorized to announce J. M. Egbert as a candidate for Sheriff of McDonough county, subject to the decision of the Democratic county convention.

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            Fare to Chicago. – The railroad company, we understand, have agreed to sell tickets to Chicago and return, for the National convention, at a reduced rate. From Macomb, Ill. ticket will be $9.00, and we supposed will be good from Saturday evening train till adjournment of the convention.

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            → Gamage is serving up the best of steaks and roasts to his customers. His meats are fat and sweet, as we know from repeated trials, and we advise our readers to satisfy themselves of this fact in the same manner.

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McDonough County Agricultural Society.

            The tenth annual fair will be held at the fair ground in Macomb, Ill., on the 7th, 8th and 9th days of September, 1864.

Great exhibition of farm stock and products.

Liberal premiums are offered in all departments.

A purse of $50 is offered for the fastest trotting horse, $50 for the fastest pacer, and $25 sweepstakes open for all pacers and trotters.

It is earnestly hoped the citizens of McDonough and adjoining counties will attend our fair and compete for prizes.

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The Black Ticket.

            A small meeting of Lincoln sympathizers met in Macomb last Saturday and put in nomination a ticket to be supported by all persons in this county who believe that the war should be prosecuted to compel “the abandonment of slavery,” and not to restore the Union of our Fathers. Such a ticket is very appropriately composed of A. Blackburn for Representative; J. B. Cummings for circuit clerk, and G. L. Farwell for sheriff. A white man’s ticket will knock that “higher’n a kite.”

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            → The republican loyal leaguers of Tazewell county, in convention assembled, adopted a resolution in favor of giving negro soldiers the right to vote. It was agreed to with only two dissenting votes. We have yet to learn whether the republicans of McDonough county are fully up to this “loyal” sentiment. We presume the only question would be about the policy of publicly adopting it. Are they not all republicans?

August 26, 1864

Macomb Journal

OUR CANDIDATES.

            We have the pleasure of presenting to the people of McDonough county, for their suffrage, a ticket which it should be the pride of every loyal man to support, and work for with a will so hearty as to admit of no doubt of success.

ALEXANDER BLACKBURN, ESQ.,

Who we expect to see represent us in our next State Legislature, is from Chalmers township, and is known to be a gentleman of unimpeachable character, and one to whom tm to leave the people can trust their interests with safety. An “old war horse” of the Whig party, he has the vim to work for the cause, regardless of personal interests, or self-aggrandizement, and devoted to the cause of the Union.

JOHN B. CUMMINGS, ESQ.,

Of Macomb, candidate for Clerk of the Circuit Court, is well known as our present able incumbent. Mr. Cummings is intensely Lincolnized, and a firm and active friend of the soldier. – His administration of that office for the past four years has been such as to merit the approval of even his political enemies, and we confidently predict his election.

CAPT. G. L. FARWELL,

Of Macomb, has claims upon his fellow citizens which all will readily recognize. Disabled in the service of his country, his patriotism and loyalty would not allow him to leave the army until his term of service had expired, and we again find him on duty in the “tented field,” where none but the brave dare go. His efficiency for the office none dare question.

J. H. EPPERSON, ESQ.,

Of Bushnell, our candidate for Coroner, was the only man, of our party, elected on the county ticket in ’56, and we are assured that he has lost none of his popularity by remaining true to the cause of the Union.

 Mr. J. W. BRATTLE,

Is the nominee for county Surveyor, and his large experience is sufficient guaranty of his ability.

The convention which nominated these gentlemen was a perfect unit on the great questions of the day, and the unity and harmony of its actions reflects credit on the delegates, who, laying aside all personal preferences, joined hands to give us our best and most available men. It now rests with the people to endorse the action of the convention at the ballot box, and we have no doubt that victory will crown our efforts in November next.

 ——————–

            → The copperheads have resolved to have peace, if they have to fight for it!

 ——————–

Peace.

          It is noticeable fact and one which defies successful contradiction, that all “Peace brawlers” are more concerned about slavery and the triumphs of its champions in the approaching Presidential contest, than they feel willing to admit. They want no peace which shall lay the rebellion and its cause prostrate at the feet of the Republic and its constituted authorities. They contend – without a shadow of authority that the Emancipation policy is the only obstacle to a realization of their chief desire, and that if Mr. Lincoln would withdraw this obnoxious proclamation, the rebels would at once lay down their arms and return to their loyalty.

Throughout the South, it was understood and agreed, prior to the outbreak of the rebellion, that slavery deliberately staked its own existence on the struggle it was provoking, and now their Northern allies are willing to inaugurate war at home, to propogate slavery and make peace with the South. “We will beat Lincoln if it has to be done at the point of the bayonet,” says a blatant peace man. This is their kind of peace and the only kind they desire. Jeff. Davis has abandoned slavery as the corner stone of their confederacy because his friends in the north have kindly taken it off his hands, leaving him but the one issue to contend for.

Emancipation is peace, while slavery is disunion. If the shackles of every slave in the country were broken today, rebellion would die, and disunion be an impossibility. Our Union would soon reconstruct itself and be firmer and stronger than ever. It would be done by the irresistable law of political gravitation.

“We seceeded to rid ourselves of the role of the majority,” says Mr. Davis. Here then is the whole truth in a nutshell. We of the North must submit to the minority, or continue the war until that rebellious minority is crushed or acknowledges the supremacy of the laws. Is any man, deserving of the name, and calling himself loyal, prepared to barter away his liberty by a fawning sycophancy toward the “rule or ruin” party? We have more confidence in the integrity of the people, than to suppose for one instant, they will permit a party to ride into power, whose acknowledged creed is peace and disunion.

 ——————–

              → The peace party have taken their stand, and no power of place or temptation of office can prevail against them. They can make no concession to the false pretences of those who advocate war as a party policy, without the sacrifice of principle, honor and pride. We are the advocates of pure Democratic principles, they of a ruinous party policy. – Gen. Singleton.

Singleton is the acknowledged head and front of the copperhead party in this State and their most prominent candidate for Governor. We hope he will be, as the only issue will then come before the people, which is peace upon any terms offered by Jeff. Davis. He controlled the Springfield convention in June ’63, he was the Father of the Peoria – Secesh meeting a short time ago, and engineered he great rebel fizzle, armed-mob, nix-cum-arous, gathering at Springfield on the 18th inst. He beat Higby, and was monarch of the mob he surveyed. “So mote it be.”

 ——————–

            → Mr. Sanders is a very clever young man, and we wish him all the glory of leading the forlorn hope of Lincoln sympathizers in this county. – He might as well attempt to make Crooked creek run up stream, as to attempt to roll back the swelling tide of democracy in old McDonough. – Eagle.

→ We feel personally complimented by the above, but politically think it reflects little to our credit. We have no desire to turn the course of that limpid stream known as Crooked creek, but we have heard of a very crooked party being straightened out in old McDonough. For further information, see the election returns of 1860.

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Self-Defense.

                                                                                                                          Bardolph, Ill.,
July 9, 1864.

Mr. Editor: — During last week it was my province to visit nearly every house in Mound township, and all over the township good Union men told me that my name had been handed around as a copperhead and traitor. It is to vindicate my character against these slanderous falsehoods, that has induced me thus publicly to deny those charges preferred against me, for I claim to be an unconditional Union Douglas Democrat – for my country, and against its enemies wherever they are found, whether in South Carolina or in Illinois. These charges, so slanderous upon my character, have not been made publicly, by good Union men, but have been circulated by a few base, unprincipled men, through a channel known to myself, and one which offers good facilities for such men to execute their slanderous designs, and for escaping the mortification which [obscured], feels when he is made to face the object of his abuse, and whose character he has attempted to destroy. To prove that I am an enemy to our brave men who are battling for our beloved country, and the eternal, immutable principles of right, and that I am not a sound Union man, the following is the evidence which these slanderous men have been enabled to elicit: 1st, That I gave the editor of the Eagle the items which he published in his paper in regard to the lawlessness of some hundred days’ soldiers, who stopped at Bardolph sometime during this summer. 2nd: That I voted for a Democrat at the Spring election.

To the first charge, I do frankly admit that I told Mr. Abbott that these men came into my grocery store, and after I had given them all the crackers I had, they stole whatever they wanted, and some things that could be of no use to them; and that they turned the faucet in an oil can and let out a considerable amount of oil; that one man went into Mr. Folsom’s shop, and while his back was turned, put on a pair of new shoes and left his old ones, and that they treated Mr. Jackson in a similar style to me.

Do any one of those cowardly sneaks who are circulating any of the above statements to injure me, dare to say I did not tell the truth? I cannot understand that to be a friend to the soldier, and a good Union man, I must attempt to shield them in their acts of lawlessness. The same style of reasoning would prove a man an enemy to the Christian religion who failed to conceal any thefts which a member of the church might commit. Yet this illogical style of reasoning is used to convince the loyal people of this vicinity that I am a copperhead and a traitor to my country.

In regard to the second charge, I will only say that I will answer it whenever I am convinced that any one has a right to question my right to vote for a Union Democrat. The course that I have pursued, in regard to voting since the commencement of this unholy rebellion, is the same that I expect to follow during its continuance. I vote for Union Republicans in preference to copperheads, and for Union Douglas Democrats in preference to Republicans.

If any of those men, who are slandering me, wish to test my loyalty, will come to me, I can forgive them for all the injury they have done me, if they will quit their mean, cowardly, slanderous conduct towards me, I, with them, will lay my hand upon the Bible, the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, and we will swear eternal allegiance to the Stars and Stripes, and recommend the citizens of this county to hang the first one of us who violates that oath.

G. H. Litzenberg.

 ——————–

            No Letter Again. – We have again failed to receive a letter from Mr. Magie. We learn that he is still in the hospital. We earnestly hope that he will soon be able to resume his place in the regiment, and we can be favored with his interesting news for our paper.

 ——————–

            War Meeting. – A meeting will be held in Colchester to night, (Friday) [?] a local bounty for the purpose of procuring volunteers sufficient to make up the deficiency of Tennessee township. The volunteers procured for one years service in the state [?] good opportunity to avoid the draft is offered.

 ——————–

            From the Front. – We regret to learn that the 16th has again been suffered the loss of many good men. – [?]ing the casualties since our last [?], we have to record the killing of Capt. Eben. White, Co. A, Capt. [?] Hutch and Lieut. – Applegate [?], and Lieut. Jos. Haines of Co. [?] We have no particulars as to the time or place where they fell. Col. Van Vleck of the 78th we also learn has been severely wounded, but to what extent we could not learn.

 ——————–

            Tremont House, Quincy. – Hotels are always an advantage to the traveling public, and for a first rate house, we would recommend to our friends and patrons the “Tremont House” at Quincy. For clean beds, comfortable, well ventilated rooms, a table spread with all the luxuries of the [?], prompt and polite attendance, a [?] landlord, and an accommodating and gentlemanly clerk, with reasonable charges, it has no superior in the [?]

 ——————–

            Come in out of the Draft. – Col. Sam. Wilson, formerly of the 16th is raising men for the one year’s service, under the recent call of Gov. Yates, for one Regiment for State service and to be stationed at Alton. – This is a rare opportunity for volunteering to avoid the draft, and as the bounty and pay is the same as for troops in the field, we look for a hearty response to the call. Col. Wilson has had experience in the field, and we know him to be an able and efficient officer. Any person desiring to enter an easy branch of the service, under a good and competent officer, can by applying to Mr. W. H. Randolph at the Randolph House receive all the information regarding this Regiment.

 ——————–

            From the 137th. – A dispatch, received in this city Wednesday, states that in the attack of Forest on Memphis, Orderly Sergeant Thad Hurton received a flesh wound in the leg, and that Mr. Ed. Brooking was taken prisoner. We also learned that a Mr. Porter, belonging to the same regiment, was killed. The rest of the boys from this place are safe, we presume, as no mention was made of any more in the dispatch.

 ——————–

            Enlarging. – Luther Johnson, in order to keep up with the growing demand for goods, is building a large addition to his store. When completed, he will have as large a store room as any town in the West. His new goods will be here by the time his building is finished.

 ——————–

            The 2nd Ills. Cavalry. – Two hundred and eighty of these “bully boys” were at Springfield on Monday last waiting to receive their pay and discharge papers. We were glad to see the McDonough portion of them arrive on Wednesday and congratulate them on the impression they made upon the State Register at Springfield. That vile sheet of the 21st stated that “they are heartily sick of fighting for Sambo, and expect in the approaching election to prove to the despot at Washington, that they have not been so far demoralized as to take his interpretation of the Constitution, or rather his will, as the land mark by which they should be guarded.” These noble veterans, who have fought from Cairo to “Sabine cross roads” could not relish this imputation on their loyalty, and are out in a card denouncing the editor of that garbage cart in no complimentary terms. We receive the edition of the Journal too late to publish their protest this week, but will take great pleasure in laying it before our readers in our next issue. How are you State Register?

 ——————–

            Chronicles of the Rebellion. – Mr. T. B. Chapman, late of the 16th Ill. Inft. is the agent for the sale of this popular and interesting work. He is canvassing the Bushnell district with headquarters at Hail & Hampton’s news depot, Hail House, Bushnell.

 ——————–

            At Home. – Several of the 2nd Cavalry boys have arrived at home, having served their three years faithfully, among whom notice Mr. Jacobs, Wm. Venable and Charlie Bartleson. They look healthy, and appear well pleased that they are at “home again.” Joe Russell of the 28th Illinois and Logan Sweeney, of the 10th Missouri also arrived home a day or two since. The boys are welcome.

 ——————–

            Excitement. – About the only excitement we had in town on Tuesday was a dorg fight. The dogs fit and fit and fit, but finally concluded to quit. Nobody hurt!

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            The Fair. – Our citizens should remember that the Fair of the McDonough Agricultural Society opens on the 7th of next month. We expect to see a full turn out, and good time generally. The officers will spare no pains to get up such a Fair as will not fail to please all who may attend.

August 20, 1864

Macomb Eagle

“To Whom it may Concern.”

            I declare that I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so. * * * The right of each State to order and control its own democratic institutions according to its own judgement exclusively, is essential to the balance of power on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depend. – Abraham Lincoln, March 4, 1861.

Any proposition that embraces the restoration of peace, the integrity of the Union, and the ABANDONMENT of SLAVERY, and comes by and with an authority that can control the armies now at war with the United States, will be received and considered by the executive government of the United States, and will be met by liberal terms on substantial and collateral points; and the bearer or bearers thereof shall have safe conduct both ways. – Abraham Lincoln, July 18, 1864.

 ——————–

“The power of the Government.”

            “With abolitionists the right of property is nothing, the efficiency of the power of the general government is nothing; a civil war, a dissolution of the Union, and an overthrow of the government, in which are concentrated the hopes of a civilized world, are nothing. – He must be blind to what is passing before us who does not perceive that the inevitable tendency of their proceedings is to invoke finally the potent power of the bayonet.”

The above extract from a speech of Henry Clay, some twenty years ago, is true and as applicable to the Lincoln sympathizers of to-day, as it was to the abolitionists against whom the argument was directed. Men who probably have never read the Constitution of the United States, or given an hour’s unprejudiced study to the theory of our government, and ignorant alike of the principles and practice of the fathers who established it, are now found declaiming volubly about the powers of the government. They make the mistake of all superficial thinkers, that a government is nothing unless it is powerful to meddle with and control the affairs of the people. They think the power of a government must necessarily be unlimited, or it will go to pieces ad anarchy ensue. While the idea of a government’s power being unlimited may be true of the despotisms and absolute monarchies of Europe, it is most untrue of the United States. The power of our government is limited and defined by a written Constitution. This Constitution confers upon the Government all the power it can rightfully exercise, and when the executive or administrator attempts the use of power beyond the written limit, he then becomes a usurper. If he is unchecked and unrebuked in this, his ambition will soon make him a despot and a tyrant over the people. Our Government has all the power conferred upon it to conserve the general welfare of the people that is necessary for the accomplishment of that purpose. In peace or war no step need be taken outside of the written limit; and our own short history, vivid in every citizen’s mind, furnishes numerous illustrations of the fact. The people have met with trouble whenever their rulers, influenced more by a wicked ambition [fold] the right to regulate matters not pertinent to their jurisdiction. The government, as intimated in the quotation from Clay, is deficient in certain powers; but these are powers in which it should be deficient. Were it not so, it would not be a Republic, but a Monarchy or a Despotism, where the liberties and rights of the people would be held at the caprice or whim of the executive. No argument is needed to show that the fathers were right in creating the Government with limited powers – in making it deficient in certain powers. Time and our history have justified their wisdom. The duty of the people at this hour is to jealously guard their own rights, as reserved by the Constitution, and not to be deceived by the foolish cry that “the Government must possess absolute power or it will perish.” If it does not possess absolute power, then it deserves destruction, and those who would usurp such power, under any pretext whatever, are the enemies of popular liberty, and are knowingly or blindly seeking to establish a despotism.

 ——————–

            → A little more than a year ago Mr. Lincoln seized the occasion of the meeting of the republican convention at Springfield to declare himself, still more emphatically than ever, as waging the war exclusively to save the Union. He had been charged with waging it for abolition purposes, and his reply was:

“You say you will not fight to free negroes. Some of them seem willing to fight for you. But no matter; fight you then exclusively to save the Union. I issued the proclamation on purpose to aid you in saving the Union. – Whenever you shall have conquered all resistance to the Union, if I shall urge you to continue fighting, it will be an apt time for you to declare you will not fight to free negroes.

President Lincoln has now justified the declaration that the northern people will not fight to free negroes. He make abolition the yoke fellow of Union and does urge the continuance of fighting for other purposes than the only one which is lawful or attainable. He thus falsifies every pledge, disregards every declaration, and violates his official oath. It is impossible now to fight in this war without fighting to free the negroes. Resistance to the Union has ceased. According to Lincoln himself it is now “apt time” for every man to keep out of this war.

 ——————–

            → If niggers make as good soldiers as the abolition reporters would have us believe, why in the name of of all that’s good, don’t the “government” quit drafting white men, and take all the blacks? There is any amount of them in this State that could be spared, and although we we have no desire to see the poor fellows dragged into a war which they did nothing to bring about, yet it would save the lives of so many white men, and as abolitionists say that all who die on the battlefields in this contest go straight to Heaven, it would be such a good chance to get the “cause” of our troubles shipped off to that “better country,” where neither niggers, slavery, abolitionism or war is known.

 ——————–

            That X. – Perhaps some of our subscribers have noticed, opposite their names on the margin of their paper, an X, or cross. Now we are not in the habit of dunning our subscribers, and don’t propose to but we never refuse money, and when our subscribers find any of the marks indicated, on their paper, they can understand that they are indebted to us, and that we want the money. Will they heed the request and save us further trouble in the premises? Crops are good, greenbax circulate freely, and all can pay who wish to.

 ——————–

            Macomb Township. – The Democrats of Macomb Township will hold a meeting at Macomb on Firday, August 26th, at [?] o’clock p. m., for the purpose of nominating delegates to the county convention.

 ——————–

            → Don’t forget the meeting in Scotland township, on Saturday 20th inst., at 3 p.m. Rally up – let us have a good meeting, and be prompt to the hour.

 ———————

            Ladies Benevolent Aid Society. – There is a movement among the ladies of the county to raise a fund for the poor, and we would like to see every lady in McDonough assist the movement. It is proposed to have contributions of every description, provisions of all kinds, clothing, fuel, and money subscribed to further this noble effort. It has no affiliation with the Soldiers Aid Society, but it is formed on an independent basis. Our poor will suffer the coming winter, unless an organization of this kind is sustained, and we call upon the ladies of the townships to contribute their mite. Contributions may be sent to Mrs. Hugh Iriwn, of Macomb, and will be exposed for public sale on the fair grounds, next month.

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            → The lovers of scandal in Macomb have been reveling in luxury the past few weeks. Reports of crim. Con., of fornication, and of adultery, sufficient to shock the dullest sensibility, have been plenty as blackberries. The details would fill a book, if drawn out after the style of tales “to be continued.” Some of the “gay Lotharios” implicated have acknowledged their peccadilloes, while others have put on a “stiff upper lip” and indignantly denied the impeachment. – There are also rumors afloat of assignations by parties who probably have flattered themselves that their sin would not find the snout. There may be and doubtless is some aggregation and some untruth in what has been told, but there is enough of fact to satisfy any man that the town is festering with lechery. Meretricious charms are more sought after and adored than homely virtue, and men whose position in society, even if they had no higher motive, should prompt them to a virtuous life.

 ——————–

            → Ben. Naylor returned home on Sunday evening last, looking well and “hearty as a buck.” There is plenty of gold in the niches of the mountains, but the labor of getting it costs, in a majority of cases, more than the gold is worth.

 ——————–

            → We are indebted to T. J. Pennington and Marshall Rogers each for a half-bushel of fine summer apples, and to J. P. Clark and S. H. Martin for sacks of green corn. – Thanks to all.

 ——————–

            → The Democrats of Chalmers township will hold a meeting at Dunsworth’s school house, on Saturday August 27th, at 3 o’clock p. m. to appoint delegates to the county convention.

 ——————–

            → A rumor reached us on Thursday morning that Col. Van Vleck of 78th regiment had been mortally wounded in one of the late engagements before Atlanta.

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            → By the last number of the Macomb Journal (miscegen) we notice that Mr. Chas. L. Sanders has assumed the editorship of that paper. We welcome him to the heavenly fold, and believe he will do the Democracy of McDonough county more good than harm. Handle the new editor gently, Mr. Eagle. – Fulton Democrat.

Mr. Sanders is a very clever young man, and wish him all the glory of leading the forlorn hope of Lincoln sympathizers in this county. He might as well attempt to make Crooked creek run up stream, as to attempt to roll back the swelling tide of Democracy in old McDonough.

 ——————–

            → A “blockade runner” was caught in town last Wednesday night. It is supposed she came in with all sails set, but in scolding around the harbor “under bare pole,” she run against some “sunken rocks,” and was unable to get off before discovery by the commander of the blockading fleet. The “prize” was tied up, and was yesterday examined before the high court of admiralty and condemned as a privateer.

August 19, 1864

Macomb Journal

The Wade-Davis Manifesto.

            It is sometimes difficult for the uninitiated to probe the motives of prominent politicians in seeking to distract and dismember the party which has elevated them to a prominent public position. Disappointed ambition has caused many a towering intellect to fall to the ground, unmourned, and unwept, and it would be strange indeed, if the Union party was exempt from the disaffected elements which pervades all parties, at all times, and especially during an exciting Presidential campaign.

This protest has been a God-send to the opponents of the Administration, and they catch at it as a drowning man does at a straw. They smile and smirk over it as though the disaffection of two disappointed office-seekers was a sure fore-runner of our defeat. The Eagle – as a matter of course – gives us a lengthy article upon the subject, which he denominates “A fire in the front.” He tells us that Messrs. Wade and Davis “are of the loyal household;” that they are the very pillars of the church;” that they are exerting themselves to arrest “Mr. Lincoln in his despotic career, and that “when such politicians sound the alarm it is high time for the people to heed the warning.”

The opposition of the two Hon. Gentlemen to Mr. Lincoln’s nomination is a fact too well known to need recital. As early as April last, while at Roseville, Ga., we had the pleasure of receiving a letter from a very prominent gentleman in Maryland, and one holding high office under Gov. Bradford. In that letter he says, two-thirds of Maryland are in favor of Old Abe, while the balance are but wire-pullers in the interests of Henry Winter Davis – who aspires to the Vice-Presidency – trying to carry the State for Mr. Chase. Pomeroy, Wade and Davis are littery opposing President Lincoln and you need not be surprised to hear of them bolting the Baltimore nominee.” Thus, as early as April did this disaffection make itself apparent to be concluded. Wade wanted to be minister to St. James and Davis Vice President – positions for which they are both totally unqualified – and they knew that Mr. Lincoln had guaged their calibre and if he was re-elected, they would have to serve in the ranks four years longer.

Occupying that antagonistic position towards the Administration, it is fallacy to suppose that the alarm of such politicians, would scare the people into endorsing their protest, and so far from being “pillars of the church” they knew nothing more of the administration than their positions as members of the National Legislature entitled them to.

We yet believe that Mr. Davis and Mr. Wade, will come out of the darkness into light, and we should be glad see them take a bold stand for Mr. Lincoln, but they chose to coalesce with either Cleveland or Chicago we would ask them to be received as they deserve. The democratic party was never proverbial for its generosity toward renegade Whigs, and the copperheads have too many paupers of their own to lionize, without picking up the crumbs of intellect dropping from the support of Mr. Lincoln.

 ——————–

Our County Convention.

            To-morrow the Convention assembles which is nominate our county officers. We would urge upon the delegates, that unity and harmony of action which is a sure harbinger of success. Let no personal feelings enter into the Convention, but give to us our ablest, our most loyal, and most available men. Laying aside all preferences, and selfish feelings, we hope to see them present a ticket to the people of McDonough, which will command the united support of all loyal men. We want men who will work for the success of the cause as well as for their own personal aggrandizement, and men who will work hard.

 ——————–

            → The following questions, which we take from the Missouri Plaindealer, a paper published at Savannah, in that State, were proposed to us by the editor thereof because we published a letter written by him to one of our citizens:

A “Loyal” Paper. – The Macomb Journal claims to be the genuine exponent of “loyalty” for McDonough county in the State of Illinois, and, although he did not want Lincoln nominated, he has concluded to support him since his nomination. We want the Journal editor to tell us how much he is willing to “go on Lincoln,” and we know of no better way of his answering us, than I answering the following interrogatories:

  1. Are you in favor of the Amnesty Proclamation?
  2. Are you in favor of allowing rebels, who have been in arms against the Government since the 17th of December, 1861, but who have taken Mr. Lincoln’s amnesty oath, to vote during the existence of the rebellion?
  3. Are you in favor of negro equality, and of allowing negroes the right to vote?
  • *                           *                           *                         *

Now, Mr. Journal, answer these questions without “dodging,” and let your “loyal” readers know how and where you stand! Don’t “nigger” out of answering these questions, without equivocating, and in a positive manner. We shall any questions you may have in store for us, and in such a way as to allow you to determine “which side we are on.”

  1. We are.
  2. If they take the oath in the spirit in which it was intended we see no reason why they should he deprived of the privilege.
  3. We are not, nor never were.

The 4th question we decline to answer, as we do not make war on private individuals.

          The 5th and last question is “why do we join hands with Heaton in a warfare against us?” [Whitaker.] We do not “see it in that light.” Mr. Heaton considers you an abolitionist, but we don’t, and we published your letter to prove that you are not; also to show the people where you and the conservative crew of Missouri stand on the great issues of the day. We do not wish to make war against you as an individual, but we do against your principles.

The editor of the Plaindealer says that he will answer any question we may have in store for him. Well, to begin:

  1. If you are, as you profess, a Lincoln man, why do you rejoice over the success of the copperheads at elections?
  2. If you are a Lincoln man, how is it that you get all your support from “democrats, copperheads, rebel sympathizers, and even rebels?”
  3. If you are a Lincoln man, why do you leave people to infer, from your letter, that you will be in attendance at the copperhead convention at Chicago as a delegate or wire-puller?

 ——————–

ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.

From the 78th Regiment.

Field Hospital, 2nd Division 14th A. C. near Atlanta, Ga.
August 1, 1861.

            I failed in writing you a letter last week. I am down sick with the fever, at this Hospital, but I think I am improving some and hope to be about again in a week or so. I had commenced a letter, and got it about half finished, when our Division was called upon to make reconnaissance some six or eight miles beyond the extreme right of our army. We made the trip out and back, the enemy almost constantly disputing our advance both ways with a small force of cavalry. The 78th did the most of the skirmishing, and has the honor of killing the rebel Gen. Wheeler, chief of cavalry. The 78th lost none in killed and wounded, but a number broke down with excessive heat and fatigue. That day’s work is what is the matter with me. This is the first time since I entered the service that I have been reported, with the exception of three days in Louisville. And I may say that last week is the only week in which I have failed to write a letter for the Journal since I commenced writing regularly on the first of February last, but I perceive that some two or three letters have miscarried. – It is my purpose to write you a letter each week, whenever I am able to do so.

I am too feeble to write more. Relying upon a strong constitution, cheerful spirits, nourishing diet, and throwing to the dogs all medicine, I hope to be about again in time to write you a good long letter for the next Journal.

J. K. M.

 ——————-

            By the last number of the Macomb Journal (miscegen) we notice that Mr. Chas. L. Sanders has assumed the editorship of that paper. We welcome him to the heavenly fold, and believe he will do the Democracy of McDonough county more good than harm. Handle the new editor gently, Mr. Eagle. – Fulton Democrat.

That is just our mission Mr. Editor. We believe that some good may be brought out of Nazareth and we expect to see such a rattling among the dry bones of Copperheads as will shake the Jeff. Davis Confederacy to its very center. We neither ask now expect any gentler usage from the Eagle, than we met with from his friends in Dixie, the three years we carried a bright and shiny gun through that benighted region.

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            → Did we not have “national existence” and “free government” up to four years ago? And yet slavery existed. – Eagle.

Yes, and we would yet have “national existence,” with slavery included, had the South not have endeavored to spread and propogate the “peculiar institution” to the detriment of “free government.”

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            Union League Notice. – A meeting of the County Council will be held in the city of Macomb, on the 3d day of September next, at one o’clock P. M. A full attendance is requested.

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            Ladies Benevolent aid Society. – There is a movement among the ladies of the county, to raise a fund for the poor, and we would like to see every lady in McDonough assist the movement. It is proposed to have contributions of every description, provisions of all kinds, clothing, fuel and money subscribed to further this noble effort. It has no affiliation with the Soldiers Aid Society, but is formed on an independent basis. Our poor will suffer the coming winter unless an organization of this kind is sustained and we call upon the ladies of the township to contribute their mite. All contributions will be sent or delivered to Mrs. Hugh Ervin, of Macomb, and will be exposed for public sale on the Fair Grounds next month. This notice comes too late for us to comment upon it this week in our editorial columns but in our next issue, we propose to bring the matter more fully before the public.

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            Stop it. – We have been requested to state to those persons who are in the habit of shooting guns and pistols inside of the city limits that they must stop it. A few days since some person discharged a gun, or pistol near the square, and the ball entered the house of Mr. Ervin Brown, passed just above his wife’s head, striking the opposite wall and fell to the floor. Another day some boys were firing at a target near the third ward school house and one of the balls entered a window in Mr. B. J. Head’s house, breaking the glass. It is true, no serious consequences happened from these cases, but there may be one happen some day, and they should be stopped.

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            Robbery in Bushnell. – Some person, or persons, on Saturday night raised the window of the bedroom of Mr. Tuttle and taking out his pantaloons abstracted therefrom $15. They also, the same night, reached into the bedroom of Mr. A. Hess and took his pantaloons from which they got $100. Quite a good nights work, we think. – No clue has been had of the perpetrators. We would suggest to our citizens the necessity of keeping a watch over their loose property.

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            Police Court. – The past week has witnessed some rather amusing and exciting doings at our Police Court. – The first case that we have to report is an assault and battery case between two women, residents of this city. – Jury couldn’t agree, and case dismissed. The next two cases came under the ordinance prohibiting the sale of spirituous liquors. The parties were fined $60 and costs. The next was a gentleman of the Irish persuasion, charged with whipping his wife. A night in the calaboose and a fine of $5 was the penalty for his “amusement.” ‘Tis but a short journey from Ireland to Germany. The Catholic priest in charge of a congregation in this city charged his cook, a Teutonic of immense lager beer power, with stealing, and Mr. Cook now lies in Bliss-ful repose in our county jail. The next case is of a poor, God-forsaken, man-despised creature, who was hounded through our streets on Wednesday night by about fifty young men and boys, was arrested and placed in the calaboose and kept till morning. For the crime of appearing in our truly moral city, she was fined $5 and costs. Mr. Weller warns his son to beware of “vidders.” We would say to all unfortunate women – beware of police courts in Macomb!

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            Fire at Colchester. – On Saturday the 13th, the shafts in the mine of Mr. Wm. Morris took fire, and in a few seconds was enveloped in flames. A large number of men and boys were at work at the time, but fortunately two means of egress had been provided, which doubtless saved the loss of life. – The cause of the accident is imputed to “incompetent men placed in responsible positions.” Our informant does not give us the amount of Mr. Morris’ loss, but says it is large, and may not be repaired for some time, causing a number of men to remain without employment for some time.

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            Riding by moonlight. – Quite a number of our young ladies and gentlemen, taking advantage of the pleasant moonlights nights, took a merry ride to Bushnell on Tuesday night. On their arrival, and as soon as the hall was prepared they repaired to the dancing to the dancing room and to use the expression of Artemus Ward, “slipped up on the light fun-tus-tic toe” until the “wee sma’ hours” of the morning. The little affair passed off pleasantly and was highly appreciated by the participants.

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            “Senex.” – In last week’s Journal we published a communication from “Senex,” but received it too late for any comment.

We would like to impress the subject more strongly upon the minds of our citizens, as they may be called upon to decide the question at the ballot-box. – The proportion of Macomb under the present charter, in criminal and pauper expenses, is certainly too large, and the proposed amendment would be but an act of justice.

The poor, throughout the county, knowing the liberality which Macomb extends to that class of our population, prefers coming within the city limits to going to the poor house, thus throwing a large proportion of the county poor upon us, for which we have to pay. – And the same occurs in our criminal expenses. One or two men may arrive here on the cars, commit depredations by breaking open our banks, stores or houses, and though their arrest and punishment is equally for the benefit of the county, yet the city is to be taxed for the jail and court expenses. Not one of our citizens will demur against paying their quota of county expenses, but they do not wish to be burdened with the whole expense of supporting or punishing the paupers or criminals of the entire county.

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            Found and Lost. – A week or two since a burglar broke jail at Lewistown in Fulton county, and came to the vicinity of Bushnell, in this county. Constable Steele, of the latter place, hearing of his whereabouts, soon started out on Monday morning last and soon succeeded in capturing him, but unfortunately, while hitching the horse, which was a very wild one, the thief jumped a fence close by, and succeeded in making his escape.

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            Rebel Flag. – We have in our sanctum, for the inspection of the curious, a handsome rebel flag, captured at New Madrid on the 14th of March, 1862, by several of the 16th boys. It is a very handsome silk flag, trimmed with gold fringe, and belonged to the “Lafayette Beagles.”

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            Refreshing. – We have had some very warm weather within the last three or four weeks, and we notice that crowds of our citizens, to allay the the burning thirst occasioned by the excessive heat, have sought the cool rooms of Gordon & Hampton’s ice cream saloon and indulged themselves in the luxury of splendid ice cream – such as the “boys” know how to get up. If you want a luxurious dish, don’t take our word for it, but go and test it yourselves.

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            From the 16th. – Letters from Lieut. Gash, dated the 6th inst., report the regiment in good health and spirits, with no casualties in Co’s “A,” or “B.” Col. Smith is commanding the Brigade, Gen. Morgan the Division, and Gen. Davis the 14th Army Corps.

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            Board of Exemption. – The Board of Examiners for Exemption convened at the Court House, in this place, on the 11th and 12th insts. We did not ascertain the number of applicants for Exemption, but this township turned out all “their lame halt and blind” which occupied the Board for the two days it was in session. Some good “goaks” were perpetrated at the expense of a few of the applicants, but the “sold” generally appreciated the point and showed their good feeling by getting considerably “beered”, happy in the misfortune which prevented them from being “grafted into the army.”

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            → We see that the new wheat is beginning to come into market rapidly within the last few days, and we understand that it is of a superior quality.

August 12, 1864

Macomb Journal

Our War Power.

            The principle ground on which copperheads oppose the war policy of the Government is, that the war is now prosecuted for the abolition of slavery.  This is a false view of the President, at least, and cannot be honestly entertained.  But suppose it were true?  What then?  Neither the rebels, nor those who sympathize with them, would have any right to complain.  They who instigated the war are responsible for its legitimate consequences.

Every Government that is worthy of the name must protect itself, when assailed, against either foreign or domestic enemies.  And the law of self defence, whether applied to individuals or states, is necessarily absolute.  No written Constitution can possibly set definite limits to the authority and power of any Government to defend itself, because no human intelligence can foresee to what means it might be forced to resort for its own preservation.  Hence, the idea that the Administration is restricted in its efforts to put down the rebellion by constitutional limitations, is grossly absurd.  Its real war power can be measured only by its right to preserve itself against any aggression, and that right is essentially unlimited save by the character and extent of the danger which threatens it.  This is the common law of England and this country, as to the privilege of every citizen to save his own life, whenever it is put in extreme peril, and it would be strange indeed, if a larger liberty or action were allowed by the municipal law, in defense of the life of an individual, than is granted by the political law in defense of the life of a Nation.

We assume therefore, that every Government, has an unbounded right of self defense, and consequently an unlimited and illimitable defensive war power.

This being so, it follows clearly, that those who put the Government on its defense, cannot justly object to any measures which it may deem necessary to employ for its protection.  The rebels are engaged in an armed insurrection against the National authority.  They have waged the war for over three years with great obstinacy and vigor.  They have been powerfully aided by their slaves, whose industry has not only supplied their armies with food and enables all the whites to serve in the ranks of the rebellion, but have been employed in building entrenchments and fighting their battles.  To strike therefore, at slavery in the South, was to aim a stunning blow at the Rebellion itself.  And was not any measure that would destroy the institution justified as a defensive war measure on the part of the National Government?

Slavery in this country is doomed.  No satisfactory – because no endearing – peace can be made, unless it is effectually wiped out.  The means taken for its preservation have precipitated its destruction, and the civilized world will not regret the fact.

We believe that the masse of the Southren people will, in time, come to rejoice over their deliverance from an evil and a curse which, but for this war, might have encumbered and afflicted them for a series of years.  Whatever may be the future fortunes of the colored freedmen, this, we think is certain, that the whites of the south will eventually find their social and industrial condition greatly improved by the abolition of slavery, and that as experience forces this conviction upon them they will become not only reconciled, but gratified to those who have relieved them of so serious a nuisance.

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The Oquawka Spectator on the Rampage.

            The last No. of the Oquawka Spectator honors us with rather a lengthy notice, which, judging from the tenor of its remarks, is not all complimentary.  The editor says we lied in our remarks two weeks since about his perverting the meaning of the Declaration of Independence.  Language emphatic but not refined.  He calls us, in real copperhead and fools argument style, “fool,” “ass,” “knave,” “small potatoes” and “fellow,” but for the first time during the administration of Mr. Lincoln, the title of “Abolitionist” is left out.  From the way he squirmed, we should infer that he thinks our article was not such “balderdash” as he represents.  We simply intended to show how copperhead editors pervert the sentences of that time-honored document, the Declaration of Independence, and to what straights they are put to defend the poor, persecuted democrats of Coles county, or “any other man.”  The Spectator supposes that we howled for “free speech,” “free press” and “Fremont” in 1856.  We always have been in favor of a free press and free speech, but we wish every sensible man to understand that “free speech” does not give license to preach treason.  We think our “penny whistle” tooted too loud for the Spectator, and without calling hard names, wish him consigned to the same fate which awaits the nominees at Chicago, which is defeat.

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            → The war is now waged for the abolition of slavery. – Eagle.

The abolition of slavery must be guaranteed before our armies submit to peace, the howl and cry of the eagle to the contrary notwithstanding.  We do no not propose to magnify the negro, but judging from copperhead sheets and orators a “nigger” is better than a white man, for they accord more space and attention to him that to the salvation of the country.  Follow the policy of your superior Mr. Eagle, and ignore the negro for dominion.  Be a man or a mouse.  The restoration of the Union for the aggrandizement of slavery is of secondary importance – scarcely secondary, for the American people will not consent to one inch of slave territory in the Union as it is to be.

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            → Abbott calls on the “Knights of the St. John” to defend him.  When the election occurs in November next, he will send up a piteous cry for darker nights than the Saint to hide his shameless head.

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            → There is no doubt in our mind, but that the Eagle will support Fremont in preference to any war Democrat the Chicago convention places on the track.  He delights in quoting from the mule-eater’s letter of acceptance, and thinks “his language cannot be too often nor too strongly presented to the public.”  Wonder why he didn’t keep his language before the public in ’56.

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The Peoria Convention.

             The Peoria Peace Powow has adjourned, having recorded its treason in a series of resolutions, which are too long and too worthless for repetition; but the following condense their meaning:

Resolved, 1. That Abraham Lincoln is a traitor and Jeff. Davis is not.

  1. Secession, according to the resolutions of 1798 and 1799, is constitutional, and has failed, and must be stopped.
  2. Repeal emancipation laws, submit to the rebels, and leave the country, to a National Democratic Convention.
  3. Mr. Lincoln is a usurper. He has denied the constitutional right of the rebels to secede, and therefore absolved them from all allegiance.  His Administration “has, and is still waging a bloody and relentless war for the avowed purpose of exterminating eight millions of freemen from the homes of their fathers, and blotting from the American constellation one-half of the States of the Union.”
  4. In order to redress these wrongs, rebels and traitors must vote.
  5. But Africans must be excluded from fighting for the Union.
  6. Because Mr. Lincoln told “all whom it may concern” that a rebel proposition to return to the Union and abandon slavery would be acceptable to him, therefore the abolition of slavery is the sole object of the war.
  7. No martial law against rebels in Kentucky.
  8. Brink back or discharge the Coles county rebels.
  9. Martial law is a “course of sprouts.”
  10. If the President puts us through a “course of sprouts,” we’ll fight. – Chicago Tribune.

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“WANTED CORRESPONDENCE.”

Letter from Lieut. Wilson to Eight Young Ladies.

[Correspondence of the Chicago Tribune.]

Memphis, Tenn., July 28, 1864.

To Eight Young Ladies, residing in Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan:

Ladies permit me to address a few lines to you through the Tribune, in regard to “correspondence” with soldiers and officers serving in the army of our country.  We the officers and soldiers of the army, need and deserve the sympathy and council of our mothers, wives, sisters and lady acquaintances from dear homes we have left behind.  From these, letters are always acceptable, are read with a deep interest, and there is always a deep feeling of respect for the writers, and the dear old homes whence they come.  There is no levity or expression of vulgar thought, or lewd allusions to the writers of them – holy home thoughts of the dear ones we love so well; and often have I seen the bronzed face of the veteran, as well as the fair cheek of the young recruit flushed with manly pride, or over them flowing tears that spoke louder than words of true hearts and Brave men.  Not so when your cold insipid and stale letters are received.  There is generally a shout of derision from many voices as your carefully written nonsense is retailed out to a corporal, sergeant, private, or may be a negro servant; and could you hear the vulgar wit and coarse expressions over your letters and at your expense, I think, ladies, you would answer no more “Wanted correspondence, for mutual cultivation.”  I trust ladies, that this article may be of service to you inasmuch as it will urge you to write only to those whom you know; and you may put it down for a fact that any soldier or officer advertising for lady correspondence, does so for no honorable or noble purpose.  Ninety-nine out of every hundred letters received by officers or soldiers are treated with contempt and derision.  Thus you see that your tender effusions, gushing out flowery and sentimental platitudes, are used to your disadvantage and injury.  In many cases the officer or soldier takes pains to ascertain your true name and then your letters not only reflect to your disadvantage, but bring disgrace to your friends.  I know of one young lady who is the laughing stock of a whole regiment, and many of them are or were friends and neighbors of hers not two years ago.  Her fair name and character are blighted, and one who has counted on her being something more than a friend to him in future has cast her aside, and her letters of truth to him are unanswered, or returned, unopened.  Ladies good bye.  Learn from this to do better.  Write to your known and tried soldier friends and relatives, and none other.

I am, ladies, your friend and well-wisher.

E. V. Wilson,
1st Lieut Co. H, 39th reg’t Wis. Vo’s.

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            Union League Notice. – A meeting of the County Council will be held in the city of Macomb, on the 3d day of September next, at one o’clock P. M.  A full attendance is requested.

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            No Letter. – We have again failed to receive our army letter.

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            Boy Killed. – A young lad by the name of Stewart was killed at Colchester on Wednesday last, being run over by the up Freight train.  He was getting on the Cars while in motion, slipped, and the whole train passed over him severing the head from the body.

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            Fast-day. – The national Fast day was very generally observed in this community.  Union religious services were held in the Methodist church in the morning, when we listened with much pleasure to a discourse from Rev. Mr. Nebitt, of the Presbyterian church.  Such unions of the Christian church is decidedly benificial and a frequent repetition of them might result in much good, if conducted with a view to promote harmony among all denominations.

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            O, Yez!  O, Yez! – We cannot too often refer to the fact that Geo. W. Bailey, on the east side of the square, keeps on hand a superior stock of dry goods, boots, shoes, hats, caps Yankee notions, &c., and that he sells as cheap as the cheapest – a fact that people are finding out to their own profit every day.  If you want to get good goods and such as they are represented to be, go to G. W. Bailey’s.

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            – We had the pleasure of receiving in our Sanctum this week Mr. D. Sweet, Editor of the Van Buren county Tribune, published in Decature, Mich.

He gives us glowing accounts of the Lincoln and Johnson cause from the Wolverine State.

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             Decidedly Cool. – A few evenings since while “bobbing around” town in company with Squibob we dropped into the ice cream saloon of Gordon & Hampton and called for a couple of dishes of ice cream – it was forthcoming, and we partook of it with great gusto and then asked for the “damage,” and were informed that there was nothing to pay – decidedly cool, we thought.  It was good cream, though, and we would advise all to go there when they want a real good article of ice cream.

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            – We received a letter from Mr. Geo. Litzenberg, of Bardolph, for publication, but too late for this weeks paper. We shall publish it next week.

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            Licensed Auctioneer. – We are requested to state that David Clarke, Esq., has taken out Auctioneer’s License, and that he is prepared to attend all calls in his line.  He may be found at all times at the book store of S. J. Clarke & Co., north side of the square.

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            Returned Home. – Mr. Theodore Bonham, after an absence of over four years, returned home a few days since.  Mr. Bonham was stopping in Missouri when the war broke out, and was one among the first to respond to the call of the President for men to suppress the rebellion.  He remained faithfully in the army for three years and has been honorably discharged by reason of the expiration of his term of service.  He was in Banks’ expedition, and received a slight flesh would in the leg, the only one while in the service.

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            Coming to Macomb. – We learn that Mr. Price, of Industry, in this county, the inventor of Price’s Sorgho Sugar Evaporator, is coming to this city to engage on a more extensive scale in the manufacture of his celebrated Evaporators.  We welcome him heartily, and hope that he may be able to supply the demand for his evaporators.  Men of Mr. Price’s energy and go-ahead-itivness are needed here, and we wish a few more would come.

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             – There is no mistake about it, but the business of Macomb is increasing rapidly, and as an evidence we would refer our readers to the establishment of T. & J. McElrath, on the south side of the square. From their constantly increasing trade, these gentlemen have been compelled to enlarge their store rooms by putting on another story on the back part, which has materially enlarged their place of business, and where they will keep always on hand a large and varied assortment of fashionable furniture, and which they will sell as low as the times will justify. Give them a call.

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            The Weather. – We have had a considerable mixture of weather during the last week, but most of the time it has been extremely warm.  Several slight showers have passed over within the last few days, but not enough to amount to much.

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           Messrs. Alex. Hall and Van C. Hampton, have opened a news and periodical store at Bushnell, in the Hail House. These two young men have recently been mustered out of the U. S. service having served three years in the 16th reg’t, with credit to themselves, and honor to the cause. They are well worthy of patronage.  Call and see them.

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             Lay Me Down and Save the Flag. – Such were the words of the brave Mulligan, after being mortally wounded.  Messrs. Root & Cady have just issued an excellent piece of music founded on the above words which is for sale at Clarke’s Bookstore.  Clarke has also received Ballou’s and Peterson’s Magazines for September.

August 6, 1864

Macomb Eagle

Keeping Promises.

            Lincoln, in his Conkling letter last September, says that “the promise have been made” to the negroes, it “must be kept.” He made the promise, but neither he nor his supporters stop to enquire if he had the rightful authority to make the promise, and this war is now carried on, as they themselves say, to keep the promise good to the negroes. While the President and his friends are thus solicitous about keeping their promises to negroes, would it not be well for them to call up a few promises they have made to the white men? Who have kept the promises of the Chicago platform? where are the promises of the Lincoln speakers and electors in 1860? where are the promises of the inaugural? – where is the oath of the President? – where are the promises of Congress in 1861? where are the promises of the generals commanding the armies? – where are the promises of every Lincolnite who has told us that this is a war to destroy the rebellion, not to abolish slavery? Why does not Lincoln remember some of these promises to white men and pledge himself anew to [fold] the courters who surround his throne stop singing hosannahs to “John Brown and his heir,” and remind the royal potentate of his promises to white men? Why is a promise to a few negroes more sacred than repeated promises to many white men? Why?

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Magnifying the Nigger.

            It cannot escape the attention of the most careless observer, that all of Lincoln’s policies have for their chief object the magnifying of the negro. In his no less celebrated than infamous note “to whom it may concern,” this disposition is strikingly magnifest. In that the negro is everything, and all other questions are insignificant. If slavery be abolished, then it will be time to discuss other matters. An inducement is held up to abolish slavery, by saying that other questions will be “liberally construed.” The restoration of the Union is of secondary importance compared to the “abandonment of slavery, and so also it the assumption of the confederate debt and the recognition of the old doctrine of State rights. These are all dwarfed in order that the negro may be magnified. In this vicious idea has been the fruitful source of our troubles, and it is singular that men who are intelligent and sane on other topics will persist in hugging the fatal negromania. If Lincoln and his advisers will not desist from placing the imaginary welfare of the negro higher than the real prosperity of the white men of this country, then the people must turn them out of the stations which they lack either the honesty or the statesmanship to fill creditably to themselves or profitably to the interests of the nation.

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            → The truth is now self-evident that we are to have no Union nor Peace, so long as the present administration is in power. Were patriots and civilized beings at the head of our affairs, peace would be restored to-day and Union re-established. After this summary repulse of their fourth effort, the rebels would be cravens and cowards to repeat their attempt for a negotiation of peace. There is now but some hope left to the American people, which is to raise in their majesty and power, and hurl from place the murdering butchers who now hold the reins of Government. Will they do it?

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Another Raw-Head and Bloody Bones.

            The republican papers “sup on horrors.” They have run the “Knights of the Golden Circle,” until that scarecrow no longer furnishes an appetizing dish at a loyal feast, and determined not to be without a “skeleton in the house,” they have invented a new sensation about a “copperhead conspiracy for a northwestern confederacy,” and they are cooking and serving up the dish in all the approved styles of the loyal cuisine. Only think of a Northwestern Confederacy which will be shut out from the blessings of puritan grace! Only think of a conspiracy organized under the name of “Ancient Order of American Knights,” numbering five hundred thousand men in its sworn councils west of the Hudson river, waiting for years to be discovered by Lincoln’s loyal subjects! – Knights of St. John and Sons of Malta, defend us! To be more serious, if possible, the associated press has been at the expense of telegraphing the terrible story all the way from St. Louis, in which city it first made its appearance in a sensation radical sheet called the Democrat. The whole story upon its face is as wicked as it is absurd. – It would not merit the slightest notice were it not probable, from the importance which has been given it, that it was inspired by the Washington people for some sinister objects of their own. The story sets out with the supposition that Mr. Vallandigham’s views are not in accordance with those of the Democratic Party – that he despairs of inducing the Chicago Convention to respond to his wishes, and that by this secret organization he proposes, as a matter of surprise, and against their will, to induce the conservative organization to take open arms against the government. If it were true, that there was any such organization, and that it comprises five hundred thousand men, it is very certain that it would never have been kept secret for so long a period. It is also queer that one hundred and twenty thousand men should be in arms in the State of New York to establish a northwestern confederacy. In truth, the whole story is full of the most incomprehensible stupidities, and must have been invented by some loyal-leaguer while in a fit of the delirium tremens. As we have said, its only importance is to be derived from the use the administration may attempt to make of this absurd canard, to create terrorism at the North, and, if its military plans do not succeed, to [fold] at the point of the bayonet. But we are satisified it will not succeed, and that they will not have the nerve to put any such nefarious scheme into execution. No doubt Mr. Lincoln’s advisers have will enough to do any possible scoundrelism; but they are arrant cowards all, as their frequent panics touching the invasions of Maryland prove. All that the opposition has to do is to maintain its party organization intact, and it will carry the election next November beyond all peradventure.

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More True than Preaching.

            The following cutting note, though addressed to the negro-war politicians in Indiana, will be found equally true of the same class in Illinois:

To Gov. Morton, Gen. Carrington, Col. Baker, and Capt. Farquear:

Your speeches at the reception of the 13th Indiana regiment will long be remembered. – Your partisan appeals ought to damn you all. You are wanting in every attribute to the soldier. Three of you are candidates before the people for office, and you seize upon the time and occasion of a reception of war worn soldiers to advance your interest and secure votes. You are mistaken. You are fully appreciated by the soldier who has stood amid the leaden hail of many a battle. One of your number, at least, has been repeatedly ordered to the field, and has never gone; and none of you ever will. The soldier knows you, and will remember you all. Your patriotism is affected. Talk about fighting! When did either of you ever see a fight or even smell gunpowder, unless at a reception or a review? But you would pile up the bones of your fellow citizens all over the country, to bleach on a thousand sanguinary fields, and keep your precious bodies at a distance. You are known, and you are understood, and notice is now served you that at least one true soldier will remember you at the polls.

UNION SOLDIER.

 ——————–

            Discrimination in Favor of the Negro. – The widows of white soldiers have to prove themselves to be such by a ludicrous and complex process, in which they are liable to fail before they can secure pensions.

A “colored lady” has only to prove that she has lived with a nigger two years as his wife, and in the event of his death she receives a pension. A white woman, it seems from this, is not quite as good as a black one, if she does behave herself as well. – Peoria Mail.

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What For?

            Will the sympathizers with Lincoln have the hardihood to longer present that this war is waged for the restoration of the Union? An opportunity to restore the Union has been presented by the Confederates, but it met with an indignant rejection at the hands of Abraham Lincoln. The war is now waged for the abolition of slavery. – The administration has fairly and openly established its position upon this issue, and there is no longer any room for cavil or doubt. The fact now stares us in the face that all this sacrifice of life and treasure has been only for the negro, and that it is only for this purpose that new and more extensive sacrifices are being, and will be demanded. As unpleasant as may be the reflection we are all compelled to know that every brother or son lost in this war has perished – not for a good and noble purpose, in a high and holy cause – but for the liberation of a few ignorant and brutish negroes, five million of whom are not worth the life of one white man.

 ——————–

A Word in Season.

            We earnestly commend to the Democrats of this county the following remarks of a cotemporary: “We have a word to say to you in reference to the importance of the political campaign now before us. You are anxious for the success of the democratic party that the government may be brought back to the principles of the framers of the constitution. You are opposed to the erection of a military despotism upon the ruins of the best government devised by human agency. You admit that the Democratic press exerts a potent influence in its behalf. Will you, individually and collectively do all in your power to extend the circulation of your local and city democratic papers? It is your duty so to do. Will you not perform all that can be reasonably required of you? Always remember one thing – that the principles of democracy flourish just in proportion to the success of the press – no more, no less. We hope you will go to work in earnest in this matter. If you can increase the circulation of every democratic paper one hundred per cent., you do vastly more than can be done by mammoth mass meetings, flags and banners. If you have a neighbor who cannot afford to take a paper in these times, go and pay for one during the campaign, and have it sent to him free of charge. We give you good advice, hope you will profit by it.

 ——————–

            How Can He Afford It? – We stopped in to Gamage’s new meat shop the other day, and presently had an armful of roast and steak thrust into our hands. On tendering a greenback in payment it was politely but firmly declined. How Mr. G. can afford to do business in that style, or how he expects to get paid for his meat, is a mystery to us. We are bound to say however, that the meat was tender, juicy, and of the best quality, and we have no doubt our readers can find equally as good anytime they may call for it.

 ——————–

            → Mr. J. H. Foltz of Hire township returned from the Boise mines, Idaho, last week, after an absence of two years. He reports the miners in that section to be doing well. He showed us a specimen lump of gold just as he found it, which is worth about $85. We think such as that will be the best cure for greenbax that can be found.

 ——————-

            → The postmaster at Tennessee reports to us that the copies of The Eagle addressed to two men at that office are not taken out. – One of them owes $2.25, and the other $2. – We are tempted to give their names to the public, but they may have some honest friends who would be mortified by the exposure.

 ——————–

            → The negro troops have again showed how little reliance is to be placed in their courage. Grant’s defeat at Petersburg is laid at the door of their cowardice. What will the negro war papers do now? The facts are too palpable to deny, and the disaster to extensive to palliate.

 ——————–

            → The Democrats of Scotland town will hold a meeting at Center school house, on Saturday, 20th inst., at 8 1-2 o’clock p. m., to appoint delegates to the county convention. A speech or two may be expected.

 ——————–

            → Lieut. Andrew W. McGaughey of the 28th Illinois, was killed in one of the late battles under Sherman. The members his late company testify their high approval of his ability and gallantry.

 ——————–

            → W. M. Lipe, who left this town for Idaho in March last, returned on Wednesday morning. Others who went in the spring may be expected ere long.

 ——————–

            → The Democrats of Sangamon and Logan counties have nominated James W. Patton and Dr. A. M. Miller for the Legislature.

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            → The barn of Mr. Venable, in the southside of town, was destroyed by fire on Friday afternoon last. The loss was about $300. There is no clue as to the origin of the fire.

A Card of Thanks. – To the friends who so kindly assisted me on last Friday afternoon in saving my house from fire, and for other assistance, I beg to return my sincere thanks.

John Venable.

August 5, 1864

Macomb Journal

To the Patrons of the Journal.

            I this week associate with me in the editorial department of the Journal, Mr. Charles L. Sanders, a young gentleman who has served three years faithfully in the U. S. army, and who has the reputation of being a bold and vigorous writer, and one, I think, who will give satisfaction to all our patrons. By this arrangement, I hope to have more time to attend to the mechanical [fold] improving it in every respect. The arrangement will make no change either in the publishing or business departments, as they will remain under my own supervision. All business letters should be addressed to me as publisher.

T. S. CLARKE.

 ——————–

           With this issue of the Journal I take charge of its editorial columns. The political Status of the paper remains unchanged, giving the nominees of the unconditional Union party – National, State and County – that support which they deserve from all loyal men irrespective of past party creeds or associations. Believing that the shortest road to peace lies in a vigorous prosecution of the war, in supporting the present administration, and in furnishing all the men and means it requires, this paper will represent that policy with all the energy, vigor and ability at the command of the editor, looking for support and patronage from all who wish well to our national integrity and perpetuity.

CHAS. L. SANDERS.

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          We would like to enforce upon the minds of all loyal men, the propriety and necessity of organizing throughout this Congressional district, and especially in McDonough county. That the copperheads are going to make a desperate effort to carry the election, no one doubts. This is their last chance and if they are badly beaten – which can be done – their secret organizations must be abandoned and their bitter opposition to a vigorous prosecution of the war cease. We want to see every man work. Our soldiers in the field expect to see us successful in the coming campaign and we must not disappoint them. While they are in the front battling for us with bullets, let us reciprocate the favor, and fight for them with ballots. The scriptural phrase, “where two or three are met together,” is very applicable in so good cause as battling for national life. The importance of a perfect organization is too apparent not to be regarded with interest. Organize and Work.

 ——————-

The Copperhead Council.

          As predicted, the Peoria Council was a failure. Vallandigham, Wood, Pendleton, Voorhees, nor any of the first class rebels were present. Not even Macomb was represented. What is the matter, can the Eagle tell?

 ——————–

          → It is no longer within the power of the noisy clamorers for a negro war to say that the South are not disposed for peace and Union; they cannot even say that the Jeff. Davis government will listen to no terms save seperation and independence. – Eagle.

→ “This war must go on until the last of this generation falls into his tracks, and his children seize his musket and fight our battles, unless you acknowledge our right to self government. We are not fighting for slavery; we are fighting for independence, and that or extermination we will have.” – Jeff Davis.

We would earnestly commend these two statements to the candid consideration of the Copperhead party. The rebel leaders have abandoned the chief corner stone of his rotten confederacy and the lesser lights in the north must prepare to adopt his programme. – From their most reliable authority we ascertain that the negro is abandoned and their true motive – dominion – proclaimed to the world. Let the Chicago Convention endorse the policy as enunciated from Richmond, and do so in terms too plain to be misunderstood. Mr. Davis speaks his mind plainly – let his supporters in the North do the same.

 ——————–

Copperheads vs. Patriotism.

          In a recent visit to the East, we had an opportunity to gage the standard of patriotism which governs the mis-called democracy.

When the advance of Lee’s thieving expedition into Pa. was made public through the call of Gov. Curtain, for 12,000 hundred days’ men, not a copperhead sheet in the State advanced the movement by calling on the people to respond. On the contrary, after publishing the proclamation of the Governor, they sneeringly called upon the [fold] and save their National Capital.

Maj. Gen. Couch addressed a note to the editor of the Harrisburg Patriot and Union, (copperhead,) asking him to sustain the Governor in the emergency. – He replied that if the men was for the defense of the State, and not to be taken over the border he would advocate the filling of the required quota, but would not advise one of the State militia to rally for the defence of Washington. Our National Capital was saved, and it is certainly food for reflection, that its safety did depend upon those who are denominated Abolitionists, Lincolnites, &c.

It is obvious to any ordinary mind that these home traitors already see defeat staring them in the face, in November next. They have kindly ignored all claim to the National Capital, and in the impossible event of Vallandigham, Wood, Seymour, or any other foul mouthed lick-spittle of Jeff. Davis’ succeeding to the Presidential chair, still abdicate our capital for the Richmond dynasty and remove their headquarters “over the border.”

Again we see their treason manifested on the pirate Semmes. The whole copperhead press unite in comparing him to Paul Jones. How disgustingly absurd. So long as the emissary of treason with his piratical craft succeeded in eluding the vigilance of our naval steamers, his career was a brilliant one. The Kearsage had a gun or two on aboard and taught this ocean robber the difference between fighting a war vessel and destroying unarmed craft. – His conduct was certainly as honorable as those men in the North, who are seeking the destruction of that government which is protecting them in person and property.

 ——————–

ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.

From the 78th Regiment.

Camp near Atlanta, Ga.,
July 21, 1864.

          We are at last south of the Chattahoochee river, and I write this in our entrenchments about four miles from Atlanta. We crossed the river Sunday July 17th. The 4th Corps crossed the day before at a point two or three miles above and marched down driving the enemy before them, which enabled our corps to lay a pontoon and cross near the railroad without much resistance. On Tuesday afternoon our regiment was called into action, and we moved forward about a mile driving the enemy before us, and just at dusk we reached the crest of a hill in a cornfield where we threw up entrenchments, and where we still remain. There were none killed and about two wounded, in this move, although as usual the bullets whistled closely, and there were many narrow escapes. Sergeant Thomas Edmondson, color bearer, was struck by a bullet in the back of the head and neck which stunned him for a few moments. His wound is not dangerous, although it will probably lay him up for some time. Samuel Naylor of Co. E, had an arm badly shattered, rendering I think amputation necessary. Yesterday morning the rebs opened on us rather briskly from their works about two hundred yards in our front. John Edmondson of Co. B received a fatal wound and was carried to the rear. – Charles Johnson of Co. D received a scalp wound, not serious. John Stein, of Co. A, received a wound of which he died in the course of the day. – From our position we could see all the rebs as they moved cautiously about their works, and our boys were exceedingly anxious to try the accuracy of their rifles upon them, but there were some of our skirmishers between us and the rebs lying upon the ground, and hence the men in the entrenchments were under orders not to shoot. At length these skirmishers were called in, and our boys were ordered to fire as fast as they pleased. We soon dried up the rebel shooting, and there were no more hurt on our side the balance of the day. It appears that we made the place to inconvenient for the rebs to stay there. About dusk Capt. Reynolds of Co. I, was ordered out with his company to reconnoitre, and he moved forward and took possession of the rebel works. In moving through the brush it appears that they disturbed the repose of a rebel soldier who had been quietly sleeping behind a stump, and jumped for his gun, but Jonas Cupp, of Industry, was too quick for him. He put a bullet through him in a moment, from the effects of which I learn that he died in the course of the night.

Capt. Reynolds still remains in the rebel works on our front. I am not able just now to say how far the rebels have fallen back. We had some desperate fighting yesterday a mile or so on our left which resulted in our success. We will probably move forward in the course of the day. I look for more fighting before we enter Atlanta, but I hope to write my next letter from that rebellious city with the Stars and Stripes proudly waving from her domes and flag staffs.

I promised in my last to give you a list this week of our sick and wounded, with some account of their whereabouts and condition, but present circumstances will not permit. I will attend to this duty, however, as soon as I can, probably next week.

J. K. M.

 ——————–

Which Side is He On.

          C. H. Whitaker, editor of the Savanah (Mo.) Plaindealer, has, at the head of his columns, the names of Lincoln and Johnson for President and Vice President; and as a general thing makes a big blow about his “loyalty,” and the loyalty of Schofield’s “pets,” the Pawpaws, but from the way the following letter reads, we should judge he belonged to the other side. – We wish our Missouri radical exchanges to copy this letter, so that the people of Missouri may know precisely how the “Conservative” party stands in that State. Mr. Whitaker was in this city at two different times last winter, and while here gave to the editor of this paper a complete verbal history of the radical and conservative parties in Missouri – that is, his version of it – in which he endeavored to make us believe that the radical party was composed almost of returned rebels. His letter to Mr. Henton shows different. Mr. Whitaker was arrested a few days since by military authority and placed under bonds, for what we do not know, but if they – the military – had the original of this letter, they would have pretty strong proof against him. We have the original in our possession and shall keep it for a few days to show to any one who doubts the authenticity of [fold].

Weekly Missouri Plaindealer Office.
Savannah, Mo., July 12, ’64.

J. L. Henton, Macomb, Illinois:

I received on yesterday a letter from Macomb, dated the 5th, and signed “J. L. Henton,” in which an effort is made to give me a complete epistolary drubbing, calling my paper an “abolition sheet,” together with other disrespectful and unkind intimations towards me. I would not condescend to write such a letter to the meanest dog on the face of the earth, as was written by yourself to me. I had always endeavored to treat you and your family as a gentleman, and little dreamed of ever receiving any other sort of treatment in return from any of them. Never, in my life, have I received such an insulting letter, from any mortal man, and I would not steep so much as to notice it, were it were it not that I feel so undeserving of such treatment, as it is unkind and unworthy of any man. I have more of pity than of hatred for the man who, without the least cause, would thus undertake to wound my feelings and that of my family by throwing out slurs, because, perchance I do not agree in politics with him. God grant that I may never be so narrow-minded down in principle as to insult you or any man. – I exhibited your very gentlemanly letter to my wife she appreciated it “hugely” I assure you – and who blames her? It is not often that I am favored with such very gentlemanly letters, and I appreciate it, the more on that account.

As for sending the Plaindealer to you, I did it through a spirit of kindness – as I sent documents to you from Jefferson City, and not with a view of offending you. I shall, however, never trouble you on that score, — not if I know myself – and I think I do. If the Plaindealer has offended you – it must be a little more than it is generally supposed to be here. There is not a Democrat in Andrew county but who is a subscriber in the Plaindealer. Tom Coffer takes it; he had 23 negroes when the war began – they have run away. Ben Holt is a subscriber and gets it every Saturday morning; when the war began he owned 18 or 19 negroes, all of which he lost by the war. Capt. Singleton takes the Plaindealer, and has got me about 25 cash subscribers; he was a man driven from his home last summer because he was a southern sympathizer and proclaimed Democratic principles. Gov. Gamble commissioned him Captain of a Paw-paw company – composed of men who were pro-slavery in principle, and about eight who had returned from the rebel army. These men had all been driven out of the county because they were so-called rebels, although there were only eight who had ever been in the rebel service. And some of them had had their houses burnt to ashes in Andrew county, their fathers and brothers killed, and their families cruelly insulted. These men, or at least about one hundred of them have now Government clothing on their persons. They are not now on duty, but are attending their crops, and prepared to take care of themselves and defend their property. I am a private in Capt. Singleton’s company – I joined it to take wind out of the sails of the Radicals, who said “every man in the company were rebels.” I can tell you, farther, that there is not five men in Capt. Singleton’s Company but who are subscribers and readers of the Plaindealer. If there is any one in Macomb familiar with matters here, or who has lived here within the past year, tell them Ben Holt, Tom Coffer and Milt Singleton and most of his Paw-paws take Whitaker’s paper, and ask whether they are “Abolitionists?” – Ask Major Nichol – he knows them all – and I am willing he should be the judge. The Plaindealer has a pretty liberal support; and it gets all it support from men who are called Democrats, Copperheads, pro-slavery men, and rebel sympathizers, and even those who are called “rebels.” There are at least twenty-eight men subscribers to the Plaindealer who were in the rebel army under Gen. Price at Lexington. All the protection they get, they get under the law and they can “stand” the Plaindealer because it upholds and advocates law. There is not a Radical – or what you call Abolitionist now taking on the Plaindealer – like you, the “Abolitionists” call the Plaindealer all sorts of bad names – and even call the editor a d – d copperhead. I write you facts, and if you doubt what I say ask Dan Ewing on Spring Creek, or write to Sam Lewis, and they will tell you whether I am a truthful man or not.

I don’t know as I am very anxious for you to read the Plaindealer. There is so much Abolition about it – it might hurt you! I shall not give you a chance to read another one of them, and I do hope and pray you will survive the “nasty abolition thing.”

I have written you a very long letter – because it is the first and last I ever intend writing you, and I have endeavored to answer your letter in a more respectful tone than it would seem to deserve. I have no ambition to insult you, although your ambition seems to crave insult for me.

Yours with Respect,
C. H. WHITAKER.
Editor Abolition Sheet.”

             N. B. – Please say to Bill Head, I will be at Chicago during the Democratic Convention, and will be glad to see him.

C. H. W.

 ——————–

              O’Hair and Frazer. – A dispatch to the Chicago Tribune, from Charleston Coles county, 29th, says – “The elaborate account of the killing of John O’Hair and John Frazer, near their old homes in the O’Hair settlement, has no foundation in fact. It is positively known here that O’Hair and his companions have crossed the Ohio into Kentucky. Some of his friends say they have joined their fortunes to those of John Morgan, the guerrilla chieftain, and that he may be expected in this vicinity when John makes his next raid.”

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 Obituary.

               Died,– At the residence of her mother near La Harpe, in Hancock county, Ill., on Monday July 25th, Miss Mary Painter, daughter of William and Hannah Painter, aged 27 years and 7 months.

The deceased was a young lady, who by her noble qualities of heart and mind – her amiable disposition, her extraordinary social virtues, and her examplary Christian life, have endeared her to all with whom she become associated. In the profession which she had selected – that of a teacher – and for which she seemed peculiarly adapted, she had entwined herself in the hearts of her pupils – with sorrowing hearts, and streaming eyes, her scholars followed their teacher to the tomb.

She has gone to reap her reward in Heaven. Her actions and usefulness, on earth, has ceased; but the bright record she has left behind, should serve as an incentive to her young associates, and pupils, to emulate the example of their departed friend and teacher, and to leave behind for the encouragement of others, as bright a life page in history, as she has done. In her large circle of friends, and to the community in which she lived, her loss will be deeply, sorely felt. She has been taken away in the prime of life, and in the midst of her usefulness. This is one of those mysterious providences which mortals cannot fathom, but we know that our heavenly father “doeth all things well.” Let her numerous friends console themselves with the reflection that “our loss is her gain.”

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 Honor to the Dead.

            It is with intense gratification we publish the following proceedings of Co. D, 28th Ill’s., Vol. Inf., upon learning of the death of Lieut. Andrew W. McGaughy, who was accidentally killed by the falling of a pistol from another man’s hands, in Natchez, Miss., the beginning of July.

Headquarters Co. D, 28th Ill’s. Vol. Inf.

Natchez, Miss., July 18, 1864.

            At a meeting of the members of Co. D., 28th Ill. Vol. Inf., Lieut John B. Pearson was called to the chair: upon taking which, he stated the object of the meeting, was to decide upon some measure to express to the friends, of the late Lieut. Andrew W. McGaughy, the highest estimation in which he was held by his fellow comrades. Also, their deep sympathy with them in their sore berevement; and appoint the following persons, to draft resolutions expressing the same: Capt. G. L. Farwell, Sergt. E. F. Patrick and Sergt. D. R Miller.

The following were presented to the meeting, and received their candid approval:

WHEREAS, Heaven has been pleased to call one of our number from among us, it becomes us, his friends to speak of him and his services as they deserve. Therefore.

  1. Resolved, That in the death of Lieut. Andrew W. McGaughy, society has lost a gentleman, the government a good officer, and the cause a zealous and able defender.
  2. Resolved, That his afflicted Parents, brothers, sisters and friends, have our heartfelt sympathy in their great sorrow, yet his good name did not die with him, and this his proverbial bravery in the cause he so early espoused, ought to calm the storm in their troubled hearts, and make them proud in their afflictions.
  3. Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be published in the Macomb Journal, Macomb Eagle, and that a copy be sent to the family of the deceased.

Lieut. JOHN B. PEARSON, Ch’m.
E. V. Sayers, Secretary.

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              Correspondence Wanted by three festive young Cavaliers, who have just returned from the front owing to their misfortune in trying to stop those flying missiles that the enemy have of late have so frequently and recklessly thrown into our ranks. – OBJECT, Fun, Love, or Matrimony. – Photographs exchanged if requested.

Address, J. E. Strong, C. L. Might or F. L. Moral. Hospital No. 8, Nashville, Tenn.

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 Correspondence Wanted.

Near Atlanta, Ga., July 1864.

            Two of Uncle Sam’s nephews, who have been in “the Army of the Cumberland,” since Sep. ’62, desire to correspond with an indefinite number of the “Fair Daughters of Eve,” residing in the “Sucker State.”

Object, Fun, Love and Mutual Improvement. “Photos” exchanged if desired.

Address, R. W. and J. B., Co. D 78th Ill. Vol. Inft. 2d Brig. 1 Division 14th A C.

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              – On Friday evening last, the stable of Mr. Venable, near Clisby’s mill, took fire and was completely destroyed. The loft had recently been filled with new oats from which its was infered, the conflagration was caused by spontaneous combustion.

——————–

              – Squibob offers apology to the young lady whose dress he had the misfortune to tread on a few evenings since at the post office. He says he got a “heavenly squeeze” at that time while endeavoring to get his mail, but being of a bashful turn tried to extricate himself, and in his hurry stepped on the flowing skirt of a fair young damsiel and “tord” it. We would like to take Squibobs place sometime – we might get “squeezed,” and we kinder like that.

 ——————–

            Arrived from Idaho. – Mr. Mich. Lipe, one of our fellow townsmen who went out to Idaho last Spring has returned. We have had no opportunity to talk with him since he arrived, and therefore do not know what report he makes of the prospect out there to make a quick fortune; but, judging from the fact that he has returned, we would think they were not verry flattering. Mich. has gained in weight of flesh if he has not in weight of gold. We understand that his “chum,” Ben. (Naylor) will be here in a few days.

 ——————–

            How He Was Shot. – The Schuyler Citizen, of last week, tells how Mr. A. D. Davies, ex-editor of the Rushville Times was shot. We agree with the Citizen that there is room for one more in the penitentiary, and we think that Mr. Davis should be induced to occupy that room for the balance of his stay on this mundane sphere. The Citizen says:

“A. D. Davies, ex-editor of the Rushville Times, and the whilom adviser of the Democracy of Schuyler, wrote an affecting farewell to his family in this place, a few weeks since, just on the eve (so he stated) of his execution as a rebel spy near Warrensburg, Missouri. From letters just received from that place, information comes, that it was not a leaden bullet with which he was shot. How he was shot, may be inferred from the fact that he has lately been married to another woman in or near that place. We presume there is room enough in the Penitentiary for one or more subjects.”

 ——————–

            A Card of Thanks. – To the friends, who so kindly assisted me on last Friday afternoon in saving my house from fire, and for other assistance rendered. I beg leave to return them my sincere thanks.

John Venable.

 ——————–

            New Meat Market. – The numerous friends of J. S. Gamage will be pleased to learn that he has concluded to re-open a meat market in this city. He has recently erected a handsome shop adjoining the old American House, where he will keep at all times fresh meats. His refrigerator is kept in nice order, with plenty of ice so that his meats are always firm and good. Give him a call.

 ——————–

            A Great Sale of Town Lots. – W. H. Neece, Esq., of this city, will sell at public auction on Thursday, the 18th inst., 50 Town Lots located on the west side of town. These lots are near the depot of the C. B. & Q. R. R., north of West Jackson street and are very desirably situated for either business houses or residences. Terms of sale: one-third down, the balance in six and twelve months. A liberal deduction will be made where the purchase money is all paid down. If you want a superior lot in this city, be sure and attend this sale on the 18th.

 ——————-

            From the 16th. – A letter from Lieut. Gash dated the 21st of July, confirms the death of Lieut. Jas. Donaldson, Co. C, and also the capture on the night of the 20th of Sergt. G. L. Hainline, Corpl. W. H. Hainline and James Forrest, of Co. A.

Another Face from the Past.

The last post drew some great discussion on Facebook, and has brought forth another image I’ve been allowed to share on here.

 

lebbeus allshouse

The soldier pictured above is Private Lebbeus Allshouse, Company I, 78th Illinois.  Lebbeus moved from Pennsylvania to McDonough County and farmed here before the war.  A veteran of the Mexican war, he enlisted in the 78th in the fall of 1862; a year later he was captured at Rossville Gap, Georgia, during the retreat from Chickamauga.  He died in Scott Prison, Richmond, Virginia, of smallpox on February 14, 1864.  My thanks to Gregory James for the image, and to James R. Gill for more information about their shared ancestor.

A Name with a Face.

As a Civil War scholar, all too often I deal with faceless names, the common soldier whose record of service survives, a man who merited mention in the Macomb Journal or the Macomb Eagle only for their death or wounding.  In rare moments, I have the opportunity to match an image with a soldier, and the anonymity of a century and a half erodes just a bit.  Such a moment came yesterday, thanks to two readers of this blog.

 

John E James 78th IL

 

This is First Sergeant John E. James, Company C, 78th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment.  His descendants, Nancy Hedberg and Julie Whitmore Bymaster shared this image with me after yesterday’s post.  Orderly James was a casualty of the assault at Kennesaw Mountain; yesterday, his name appeared in the casualty list printed in the Eagle.  Before the war, First Sergeant James was a teacher in Blandinsville, northwest of Macomb.  In the fall of 1862, he enlisted as a private in the 78th; in eighteen months he was promoted to first sergeant, and at some point in 1864, to Second Lieutenant, a rank he never lived to serve at.  He was approximately 28 at the time of his death, July 22, 1864.

A Name with a Face.  So much more than thousands of others.

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