September 2, 1865

Macomb Eagle

HISTORY OF THE 84TH REGI-
MENT ILL. VOLS.

BY L. A. SIMMONS.

[CONTINUED.]

            The condition of the wounded during this great battle was deplorable. On the morning of January 1st, 1863, we assisted in gathering together at one of the field hospitals, all the wounded of the Regiment, where their wounds were attended to by Asst. Surgeon McDill, assisted by Lieut. Alex P. Nelson of company K who being a member of the medical profession, was detailed for duty in the absence of Surgeons Kyle and Marshall, who were sick or on duty in hospital. But when, we had collected all these suffering men, at the Division hospitals, we were unable to procure tents to shelter one tenth of them; nearly all for two or three days had to lie out of doors, upon the damp ground, covered only with blankets, and having a good fire at their feet. As rapidly as possible, they were sent to the hospitals at Nashville, but suffering as they were, the torture was most excruciating, as they rode twenty-six miles in army wagons. On the 4th of January we visited the general field hospital, where the vast amount of pain and suffering made us truly “sick and sore at heart.” Here were acres of ground covered with hospital tents, all of which were full of wounded men, nearly four thousand in all, and wounded in every possible manner. There were probably a hundred brace men dying daily at these hospitals. Such is war, but we cannot describe its horrors.

CHAPTER IV.

CAMP NEAR MURFREESBORO, FORAGING,
SCOUTING, ETC.

           For several days after the battle of Stone River, the whole army that had taken part in this terribly bloody engagement remained near the battlefield. All were needing rest, for the exertions of both men and officers had been extremely fatiguing, but situated as the army was, without tents, with a very scanty supply of blankets, at midwinter; even in this thickly timbered country we could not pass the nights comfortably now that the excitement of action had subsided. During the battle night after night no fires were permitted. The men and officers worn out by the labors of the day, would lie down and sleep till chilled through, and often wet through by the cold rain, then walk and run till warmed by exercise. But now the battle was over and each day we were anticipating an advance in pursuit of the enemy, who had fallen back to Tullahoma, or orders to go into winter quarters. On the morning of the 7th of January, the 2d division was ordered to march, and slowly moved out from the thick woods northwest of the battle field of December 31st, and passed directly by it, on the road to Murfreesboro. We crossed the river about a mile northwest of the town and between the river and town noticed the broad fields where the enemy had a few days before been encamped. Many of their chimneys were still standing, from which it was evident, that they had been built to last for the winter. Passing through Murfreesboro where all the public buildings, and many private residences, had been converted into hospitals, in which the enemy had been compelled to leave hundreds of their wounded – we took the pike leading towards McMinnville and Woodbury. After marching out about three miles the division encamped, and our Regiment was detailed for grand guard or picket. On the next day we were relieved and found, on returning, that the brigade had gone into camp, and was expected to remain some time. Our teams had come up from Nashville, bringing most of our tents and baggage, and with them came a score of those who had been sent to convalescent camp when we started out for the fight. – The day was passed in hard work, cleaning up camp, building chimneys, &c., and about 4 o’clock, p. m., the whole brigade was moved some two miles north, and again encamped near the Lebanon pike, in a thick grove. The succeeding two weeks passed without incidents of especial interest. We were in the midst of material for building log houses and shanties, but not yet having learned this material portion of the great art of making life in the army not only endurable but agreeable, we built no houses but contented ourselves with the old Sibley tents; long since thrown aside as murderous, totally unfit for white men to live in. Almost day by day those who had fallen sick on the Kentucky campaign and at Nashville were rejoining us, so that our decimated ranks were soon filled up, and we had more men present for duty than we had on the eve of battle. The weather was not very cold, but damp and rainy.

On the 23d of January drilling again commenced, but the same day we were suddenly surprised by the “assembly” being sounded at brigade headquarters and within an hour were on the march toward Woodbury. – Marched that evening twelve miles to Readyville, when the 1st and 2d division were encamped. On the 24th, the whole division advanced on Woodbury, eight miles distant, from which the enemy were driven after a brief skirmish – and the division returned late the same evening to the vicinity of Readyville. Here our brigade remained until 4 o’clock p. m. of the next day, when the order to return to camp, which we reached about 7 o’clock, having made about half the distance on the “double quick,” while the rain was pouring down in torrents.

About this time the report of Col. Grose upon the battle of Stone River was published, and excited no little angry feeling in our Regiment. We thought then, and still think that he did us gross (Grose) injustice. He complimented all the regiments of his brigade for their valor, and closed by saying that the new regiments (ours was the only new regiment in the brigade) seemed to vie with the old, &c., &c., – when we claimed, and to this day stand ready to prove, that we withstood the furious charges of the enemy more firmly, and maintained our positions more tenaciously than any other regiment in the brigade. – But for some time before the battle, Col. Grose and Col. Waters had not been on very friendly terms, in fact, on the Kentucky campaign some hostility of feeling was engendered between them, which only ended by separation at the close of the war – and at the time above mentioned and frequently thereafter proved not only an annoyance but an actual injury to the Regiment, giving it severer duty and depriving it of its just deserts. But of this anon.

This was a season in which rumors and reports were constantly pervading camp, one of the most amusing of which was that our Regiment was shortly to be mounted on donkeys – for outpost and scouting duty.

On the 28th of January the Regiment was detailed to work on the extensive fortifications which were then being erected northwest of the town of Murfreesboro. The weather was rainy, windy, and excessively cold, and double rations of whiskey having been served out, there were not a few amusing incidents transpired “in the shanks of the evening.” Some men who had never before been known to taste liquor came to camp seeing double and marching mightily cross-legged.

On the 31st of Janary the Regiment was detailed to guard a wagon train to and from Nashville – from which place up to this time we had drawn all out supplies in wagons – and marched through the same day. The next day, while the train was [fold] men had an opportunity to see their sick and wounded friends in the hospitals. The wounded of our Regiment were not recovering as rapidly as might have been expected, the effects of the fall campaign still lingered in their systems, and having been deprived of vegetable diet, there were many cases of erysipelas and gangrene.

On the 3d day of February Col. Waters returned from home, where he had made but a very brief stay and brought the very gratifying intelligence that the 84th had been heard of in our own State; that at home it was appreciated, if it could not be by our brigade commander. The next day the Regiment returned, having had a rather unpleasant trip, for the weather had been severely cold the last two days they were out. As soon as Col. Waters returned he directed elections to be held to fill the vacancies occasioned by death on the field and from wounds as well as by resignations. Captain Davis, of company D, had died of wounds received at Stone River; 1st Lieut. Adam was promoted to Captain; 2d Lieut. Scoggan to 1st Lieut., and Sergeant H. B. Miller was elected 2d Lieutenant. Lieut. Kendrick, of company I, died in hospital at Bowling Green, Ky., in November, and Q. M. Sergeant A. S. McDowell having been elected 2d Lieutenant, had command of the company through the battle, as Captain Griffith and 1st Lieut. Scott were both in hospital when we marched from Nashville. Captain Griffith having resigned, Lieutenant McDowell was promoted to the captaincy. Company H had been particularly unfortunate in battle, 1st Lieut. Ball and 2d Lieut. Abercrombie having been killed on the field, private Peter McLain was now elected 1st Lieutenant and Corportal J. N. White 2nd Lieutenant to fill these vacancies. While speaking of promotions we may here mention the fact that 2d Lieut. James A. Russell, of company B, had been promoted to 1st Lieutenant and Quartermaster before we left Nashville, but being on duty as brigade commissary at the time, did not enter upon the duties of his office until January 1, 1863. Sergeant Dilworth had been promoted to 2nd Lieut. of company B, and this we believe concludes the list of commissioned officers up to March 1, 1863. Early in February the question was started, and not a little agitated, as to who was the ranking captain of the Regiment, a question of much importance in case of the absence or inability of the Col., Lieut. Col. and Major, but the question was not settled till several months after, when Capt. Ervin, whose claims were advocated by many (including the author) did not receive the honor justly merited by organizing the first company.

On the 8th day of February the Regiment was ordered out to guard a foraging train, and had a very severe days work, marching out fourteen miles, loading a large train and guarding it to camp. Though the Regiment had recruited very much since the battle, there were in February a great many sick, and as each company had only one wall and two Sibley tents, we cannot think it remarkable that many should suffer from living in in such close quarters.

On the 10th day of February, the rifle pits in front of our camps were commenced and for several days heavy details were made for this duty. Still there were many (there always is,) who remained in camp, but they were seldom idle. At this particular time, about three-fourths of the whole Regiment were devoting their leisure hours to making rings, shields, etc., out of the beautiful white muscle shells, which were found in the shoals and on the banks of Stone river, Many of these articles manufactured in camp, no doubt speedily found their way to the homes of the makers, and will long be preserved as mementoes, as keepsakes from the hands of a battle-tried soldier.

On the 20th of February another of those hard days marches was made with a foraging train. The Regiment this time went back towards Nashville, crossing over Stewarts creek and in the neighborhood of Smyrna, sixteen miles from camp loaded their train, and returned to camp the same night. On the 22d of February, Gen. Rosecrans issued a very patriotic and complimentary order, and directed that a battery from each division fire a salute. The 4th U. S. battery attached to our brigade executed the order in fine style about sunset. About this time Gen. Rosecrans also issued his order directing the selection in each company of each regiment, of the men who had particularly distinguished themselves in the recent engagement, directing that their names should be entered upon a roll, to be known as the “roll of honor.” The selection in our Regiment promptly took place, but the result seems to have been lost from the regimental records, and we regret our inability to give the names of the soldiers which were placed upon the roll. We will state in passing that, it was the design of Gen. Rosecrans to organize the men, thus designated into battalions, for special duty in scouting etc, but this design was subsequently held impracticable by the War Department, and the “Roll of Honor” was almost if not entirely forgotten ere [fold] of the war.

On the 24th of February, the Regiment drew a ration of soft bread, that is, ordinary bakers bread; the first they had seen since we crossed the Ohio river. During the month of February, most of the officers of the Regiment were busy making out their Ordinance returns, and the almost innumerable reports required at Regimental, Brigade, Division, and Department Head Quarters.

On the 4th day of March 1863 the Regiment having been in a commotion for at least three weeks, on this account, received pay to the 31st day of December 1862. It was a day for setting all accounts, for no sooner did the men receive their hard earned greenbacks, than they hastened to the sutlers, and the other creditors and squared accounts. This custom ever continued prevalent in the army, and it was most common on the day after pay day to hear the men saying in an exultant tone, that they owned no man anything.

On this same day we were paid (March 4th) Sergt. Edson, J. G. Waters and several others who had been severely wounded, rejoined us able for duty. These were the first of our wounded, who had returned from hospital since the battle. At least two thirds of those who were severely wounded never rejoined us afterward, many were assigned to duty in hospitals, many were discharged, and a few were so unfortunate as subsequently to be transferred to the Veteran Reserve, or Invalid Corps. From the fact, that men who disliked hard work, or would flinch in the hour of trial and danger, had on one pretext and another obtained transfers to this corps; it became very unpopular with men at the front, and members of it were generally designated as “Condemned Yankees.” On the sixth day of March, the author in company with Uncle Chauncy Case, the oldest man in the Regiment, and J. G. Waters, visited the battle field of Stone river. We noted particularly the positions of both armies, and especially the positions held and so pertinaciously maintained by our Regiment, during that day of carnage, commotion and slaughter, December 31st, 1862. Though more than two months had elapsed, there were abundance of mementoes of the terrible conflict, in the split and shivered trees, the barked and bruised underbrush, the fragments of shells and more than all the flattened “minnie balls” that we could gather up by scores, anywhere over many broad acres. The field of battle of January 2d did not furnish nearly so many indications of the recent deadly struggle, but at the ford of Stone river, where the Regiment crossed three times during the battle, we found many “minnies” among the beautiful shells. We secured many memorials, and on our return went to each of the strong positions taken by the defeated army, thence to the strong forts and breastworks then nearly completed under the direction of Gen. Rosecrans, which have been the means of keeping Murfreesboro, in our possession, ever since it was gained by the great battle of Stone river, by the blood and lives of thousands of brave, noble patriotic men.

The 9th of March will ever be remembered by the Regiment as the day when we had tents struck, teams loaded, accoutrements on, and momentarily awaited the order to move from 9 o’clock a. m. until dark, and finally set our tents for the night, and in the morning were informed that we should not move at all. On the 11th Lieut. Coulson, of company C, was marched out of camp by a file of soldiers sent for him, having been dishonorably dismissed from the service by order of General Rosecrans, for disloyalty. We record this with sincere regret, but to make our history true and correct, facts must be stated however unpleasant. The drill by company, battalion, and brigade, was assiduously attended to when the weather was suitable, during the entire winter and spring, and ere we started upon the summer campaign, ‘the boys’ thought they understood it very thoroughly. The great complaint in camp, during this period, was a lack of reading matter, papers were scarce, and very few books could be obtained. We must think that the good people at home scarcely realized this want, or they would have done more to alleviate it. The remaining incidents of camp life from March 15th to June 24th, 1863, when we started on a campaign, which we deem worthy a place in our Regimental History, we reserve for another Chapter.

[To be Continued.]

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            → At the late Republican convention in Warren county, the soldiers claims were entirely ignored, every office of any importance was given to the stay at home patriots, instead of soldiers. They did condescend to nominate one soldier for an unimportant office. In Warren the republicans can elect their candidates without reference to the soldiers, hence they give them the cold shoulder. In this county they cannot, and hence they think if they put out a soldiers ticket they can BUY soldiers votes. Noble opinion you have of soldiers, ain’t it? Do you think they CAN BE BOUGHT because one of their number is placed upon a ticket with those who favor negro suffrage. We think you will find that the soldiers have a more exalted opinion of their principles than to barter them away for place.

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A Poor Opinion.

            A republican told us the other day that he was opposed to “running men for office simply because they had been in the military service,” but says he “we intend to run some this fall in order to get the soldiers votes.” Soldiers, don’t you think that the republicans have an exalted opinion of you. They intend to run soldiers to ‘CATCH SOLDIERS VOTES.’ We rather guess they will find that the soldiers will not be CAUGHT with such small game.

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            The Bushnell Press an exclusively “loyal” paper published at the thriving city of Bushnell in this county, has a short article in last weeks issue giving some of his loyal friends “a rub on the knuckles” for trying to curb him on the negro question. Mr. Swan says he advocates negro suffrage from “principle and he does not care whether it helps or injures this man’s or that man’s chance for office or not. That is the way to do it, Swan, advocate your sentiments whether it injures their poor chances for office or not.” You republicans who claim to be opposed to negro suffrage, what do you think of this? The patriotic leaders tell Swan that they believe as he does, but it won’t do to say so until after the election! No, if we advocate it openly we can not catch some poor fellows vote. We will deny it until we get your vote, and then we will advocate what we please. We ask those who are opposed to negro suffrage if they intend to be caught by such shallow bait.

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            → The republicans of this county have called what they term a convention for the purpose of nominating a ticket for county officers. The thing is nothing but a farce. The Macomb clique have men selected and every thing cut and dried for the occasion. The delegates will meet for this purpose of ratifying the selection of the Macomb clique. We are informed that it is the intention of the wire workers in Macomb to make a bid for Soldiers votes. We judge they will wake up and find that the soldiers are not IN THE MARKET.

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            Editor Eagle: – The editor of the Journal, one “Maggy,” lately distinguished in battle scenes, is wont to “take on” because some of our good citizens are so unfortunate as to have in the year 1864 but small incomes subject to taxation. Now I believe the list is correct, and it is far from my purpose to reflect upon any one of those who have been fortunate enough to have an income subject to taxation, be it ever so small; and while it may be a matter of surprise that our “popular merchant’s” income is larger that anybody’s, and that the shoe merchant Mr. Browne’s income is larger than G. W. Bailey’s, and several other merchants, and that Andrew H. Allison’s is only fifty dollars, and that Tom Gilfrey confesses to more than Joe Anderson, (this latter though not so much a matter of surprise as I am told the stock business was very poor up to the first of last January), still I hold that to say the least, it is in very bad taste for a man to grumble because other people do not have large incomes, while he himself does not pay a cent. If the interest on our public debt was not collected until Magie paid a part of it, “Gabriel” would blow his trump before Bill Bailey would get a cent of interest on the $35,000 of 5-20 bonds he is so lucky as to hold.                                                                                            Poor Man.

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Soldiers Dinner at Spring Creek.

FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.

            On Thursday the 24th inst. the patriotic citizens of Spring Creek, in this county, prepared a dinner for returned soldiers, extending their invitation to all the returned soldiers of the county. The recent return of a large number who had belonged to the 124th Illinois Vols. including Lt. Colonel Roach and Capt. Griffith haqd perhaps initiated the movement, but returned soldiers from all other regiments were invited, and heartily welcomed. It was our good fortune to be present at the festivities and partake of the excellent dinner, and cordial “welcome home” there given. The invitation by some mishap, had not been very generally made known, and its being now one of the busiest seasons of the year, we had not expected to see a very large assembly, but when about 10 1-2 o’clock a. m. we reached the beautiful grove, near the residence of J. D. Hainline Esq., we were agreeably surprised to find a large crowd already congregated. The grove for some distance on this side was filled with vehicles and saddle horses, the ample supply of edibles was being collected and while we were strongly reminded of a “good old fashioned camp meeting,” we did not fail to note the great cordiality and good feeling that prevailed amongst all the citizens, and returned soldiers there assembled.

The meeting was speedily called to order and all the returned soldiers requested to assemble at Mr. Griffith’s house, about three or four hundred yards distant. It was like sounding “the assembly” in camp, and in a few minutes about two hundred came together [fold] Lt. Colonel Roach to take command. He accepted the post of honor, and informed us that a battalion would be formed and marched to the grounds, and listen to an address welcoming us home, by the Rev. Mr. Kirkpatrick; that it would now be necessary to select one or more of our number to reply in our behalf to this address after which we would march to the tables. Capt. Brink and Lieut. Simmons were selected to reply, and the battalion being speedily formed, marched in fine style to the stand, where the column closed in mass, and Mr. Kirkpatrick welcomed the returned “boys in blue,” in a very cordial, eloquent and pertinent manner. For once, we must say we had the pleasure of listening to a brief, pointed speech, defective only in its unusual brevity. Capt. Brink replied in an impressive, candid and eloquent manner, and was followed by Lieut. Simmons, who reviewed the progress of the war, and dwelt at considerable length upon the condition of the country before, during, and its fortunate termination. Next came the most excellent dinner, but we must despair of doing it as much justice in description, as we did by standing for more than half an hour, at the board loaded with all the substantial articles that go to make-up a good living, while all the delicious delicacies in which our prosperous neighborhoods abound were placed in profusion before us, or handed around by lovely, smiling, almost adorable young ladies, who seemed to be greatly delighted in giving this bounteous welcome to the brave boys who had endured the trials and hardships of life in the army. Ere the soldier boys left the table, we heard several deep sighs along the line, but failed to determine whether they originated in the satiety occasioned by over-eating, or in the deep impression made by the fair ladies in attendance, upon the susceptible hearts of our soldiers just returning to citizen life. After dinner was over, Lieut. J. G. Waters being loudly called for, came to the stand and addressed the assembly in his fluent, impressive and eloquent style. Col. Roach was next called for, and spoke with deep feeling in regard to the joy experienced on returning home, dwelling with strong emotion upon the fate of the many noble ones, who have fallen by disease and on the battlefield, during this long and terribly cruel conflict, this great and grand [fold] He expressed himself in favor of erecting a monument in this county, while in our hearts we cherish the memory of those noble unreturning braves with solemn and sincere affection.

Mr. Alexander Blackburn Sr. being called for responded in some very pertinent remarks in regard to building a monument of those who went from this county and laid down their lives upon the glorious altar of our country. He said talk would not do, we must act in this matter; it must have a beginning if a Soldiers Monument Association is organized in this county. He then put to vote the resolution: that we are in favor of erecting a monument in this county which shall contain the names and regiment of all who have been killed or have died from wounds or disease while in the United States service from this county; which passed unanimously. He then moved that a committee of three be appointed to prepare an address on this subject to the citizens of McDonough county to have it published in the county papers, and in said address to appoint a day for the citizens the whole county to assemble at Macomb and organize this association.

This resolution was unanimously carried, and Col. Roach, Capt. Ervin and Capt. Griffith were selected to prepare and publish the address. It will probably appear next week.

The exercises of the day were closed about four o’clock by the members of Co. I. 124th regiment Illinois Vols. returning to the ladies of the Good Templars Lodge at that place, the old flag which was by them presented to the company when it organized in 1862. The remarks of Col. Roach in returning it, and of Capt. Brink in receiving it, on behalf of the ladies, were interesting and appropriate.

The assembly now began to disperse, and we heard diverse estimates upon the number which had taken part in the pleasing exercises. We think there was at least twelve and possibly fifteen hundred persons present. It was a day of welcome, thanksgiving and joy; old and young, matron and maiden, soldiers returned and citizens whose sympathies had ever been with our army, all seemed to enjoy the occasion vastly, and we may hope that much good feeling and “good will to all” were unkindled, that we may frequently have the rare pleasure of meeting our fellow soldiers in as kind-hearted a community at as luxurious a repast as was prepared for us, by the generous sympathizing and patriotic citizens of Spring Creek.

S.

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Coming Down in the Price.

            In 1860 the republicans paid men from a suit of clothes down to five dollars and all the whiskey they could drink, provided they would vote the republican ticket. In 1865, the same republicans propose to BUY soldiers votes by placing soldiers on their tickets to county officers. Verily, they think soldiers are easily bought.

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            → Our friend Brattle says that the republicans wont run on the negro suffrage question this fall. Oh! no but they will be loud for negro suffrage after the election. They are afraid they can’t catch soldiers votes if they come out and advocate their principles openly.

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            → S. H. Williams has sold his dry Goods Store to W. C. Burns. Mr. B comes recommended as a thorough business man just such as Macomb has long since needed.

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            The Chivington Massacre. – The massacre of a whole village in Western Kansas by a noted Kansas parson, famous or rather infamous for brutality and excessive “loyalty,” named Col. Chivington; is undergoing investigation at Atchison Kan. In his testimony, Gen. McCook says, “it was the most coldblooded, revolting, diabolical atrocity ever conceived by man or devil.”

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            “And not only did the organ spit its venom upon the soldiers, and all who claimed to be the soldiers friends, but it went so far in its hate as to attack the reputation and character of the soldiers’ wives, by uttering the meannest and vilest insinuations against their chastity.” – Journal.

We do not hold ourselves responsible for anything that may have appeared in the Eagle prior to our connection with it. But when Magie says that any such thing as the above has appeared in the Eagle at any time, he asserts what he knows to be a low, mean, contemptible lie. But if the editor of the Journal wishes to enter into that kind of discussion we are ready for him. We assert boldly that those who have made such remarks – and have even went farther – in this town and other places in this county are republicans, and we can give their names, places, and the times when and where.

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            That’s So. – Messrs. C. C. Chapman & Co. announce through our columns that they have purchased the stock of books and stationary of Willie Wyne, at the Post Office, and are adding largely thereto, which they offer to the public at reasonable rate. Every thing that is kept in a first class book store can be found or procured at short notice. Call on them and examine their goods. Remember they hold forth at the post office.

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            “The Eagle is moved to say something about the monetary contributions of Democrats, and thereby hangs a tale.” – Journal.

If the tail of the Journal man had hung closer to him, he might have gained a much better reputation.

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            More New Goods. – A. J. Davis has just returned from the east where he bought a large stock of goods. Mr. D. knows just what kind of goods is required in this market and has never failed to make good selections and always keeps the best in the market. Go to Davis, to make your purchases.

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            → The poor quintessence of all meanness says that he made out his bill for advertising and printing, amounting to $28, and then contributed $13 of the amount and received in cash $15. Magnanimous soul!! Charge the executive committee for publishing a notice of the 4th of July celebration $10, a thing which was never before thought of by any publisher in Macomb, and then out of the magnanimity of his gizzard makes a present of $13. Sweet Magie, gentle Mage; noble, generous hearted Magie.

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            → Our young friends James H. and Nathan W. Johnson intend removing to Mount Sterling and opening a dry goods store in that flourishing town. These young men have been clerking for Mr. Luther Johnson, the popular dry goods merchant of this place, for a number of years, and are therefore thoroughly acquainted with the business. – We congratulate the citizens of Mt. Sterling on the acquisition of so thorough and energetic business men as the Messrs. Johnson’s, and bespeak for them a liberal patronage.

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            New Music. – “Good Night, Farewell,” “Andante and Scherzo,” “Gay and Festive Fellow of the West,” “Rain on the Calm Lake,” “Floating on the Lake,” “Linden Bowers,” “Love, the Guerdon of Love,” “Pilgrim’s March,” “The Coming of the Day,” “The Prayer,” “Look out upon the Stars,” “The Bird at Sea,” are among the many new pieces of music just received at Clarke’s bookstore.

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            To N. L. Hunt. – Those boots advertised by you as lost have been found and left at this office. You can have them by calling or sending for them.

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            Returned. – Our friends Henry Marvel and Jesse Bowman have returned from Idaho. They think that Illinois is a better country than any they have seen and say they are perfectly satisfied to settle down in Old McDonough and remain during the remainder of their days.

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            They have no love for the soldiers. – Journal.

You are a pretty man to talk about love for the soldiers. Did you not buy old papers at a cent a piece, and sell them to the soldiers for ten cents, in violation of orders, and for this swindle was you not sent back to the regiment.

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            Information Wanted. – A poor widow desires to ascertain where her only son may be found. His name is Samuel T. Rankford; about eighteen months since he enlisted in company C, 45th regiment Ohio volunteers, in Capt. J. D. Stover’s company, and his mother has not heard from him since. He is eighteen years old, heavy set, and about five feet six inches high. Any information will be gladly received by his mother.

REBECCA RANKFORD.
Salem, Marion County, Ill.

            Papers friendly to a disconsolate widow will please copy.

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            The attempted negro insurrection at Aquia creek is a legitimate result of the agitation of abolitionism. The negro has seen several millions of white people murdering each other to secure his freedom; and he now finds that he is more an object of solicitude than southern white men, and hence it is not wonderful that he has obtained an exaggerated idea of his own importance and his own rights. The end of these negro riots and mutinies will only occur when we extend to the negro no more considerations than we do to white men.

September 1, 1865

Macomb Journal

LIFE IN THE ARMY.

Being the Observations and Experi-
ences of a Private Soldier.

BY J. K. MAGIE.

CHAPTER VI.

(Continued.)

            It was while our regiment was camped at Beech Fork, in the latter part of October, that we were paid our twenty-five dollars advance bounty. There was considerable dissatisfaction expressed in the regiment against our colonel, Wm. H. Bennison, in reference to the delay in the payment of the bounty. It is a fact that our colonel about this time was extremely unpopular in the regiment. He was passionate, haughty and surly, and at times very overbearing in his manner. He seemed to lack a proper knowledge of human nature, and had a faculty of getting the ill-will of the men when there was no occasion for it. The men had enlisted under the promise of $25 advance bounty, and many had counted confidently on this money to leave with their families. But nearly three months elapsed from the time of enlistment before it was paid to the men. Now I happen to know that Col. Benneson was not at all in fault in the matter of this delay, but he was too independent in his feelings to make any explanation to the men.

With the exception of two or three days, when we were visited by a snow storm, the closing days of October were very pleasant. Hickory nuts and persimmons abounded in that section, and the boys gathered them in large quantities. During our stay at Beech Fork the boys had no occasion to go hungry. Honey and fresh pork were the staple articles, as the farmers in that section can well testify. Whenever the boys got information respecting the possessions of some inveterate secesh sympathizer, if it was not over three or four miles distant, he was very likely to receive a visit from some of our venturesome soldiers who believed in the policy of levying contributions on the enemy.

The ignorance of the poor whites in that section was deplorable. There were many who came to our camp to sell pies, cakes, &c., who had never before seen a postage stamp. The boys explained their use and value, and at length induced them to accept them in exchange for their nick-nacks. – But these poor pie vendors did not know the difference between a one cent and a three cent stamp, and so they all passed current for three cents. There was one urchin in our company who had brought with him from Quincy one of those printed cards in the form or appearance of a bank bill, which were once more common than they are at this time. This was passed off on a farmer in that vicinity for ten dollars, the purchaser receiving seven dollars in produce, one dollar in money, and the balance in a due bill. Another youngster known as Joe Bayles, upon hearing of the ten dollar operation, produced a very neat and fancy label form from a sweet oil bottle, and sallied forth, and soon come back with as many pies as he could carry, telling us he had bought a dollar’s worth with it.

There was one farmer living near Beech Fork who awoke one morning and found his fattest shoat missing. He hunted around and shortly found in a fence corner the head and hide of his missing porker. – Seizing the head by an ear he started for camp to see the “boss.” The tent of Captain Blackburn, of Co. A, was pointed out to him as that of the “boss.” Laying the remains of his hog on a stump near by he entered the tent of the Captain and laid before him the particulars of the loss and finding of the remains of his hog, and he desired to know if he could be remunerated for the same. The Captain replied that he could only act upon the fullest evidence, and how was he to know that the hog killed was his. “But,” replied the farmer, “I happen to have the hog’s head with me, and I can prove it by the ear marks. I will convince you of that;” and the farmer rushed out of the tent only to discover that the “mischievous boys” had removed the head to some place beyond his knowledge. The captain told him he must see the head before he could do anything about it, and as the captain never did anything about it, the presumption is he never saw that defunct hog’s head.

Another farmer living in that vicinity named Florence was known to be strongly in sympathy with the rebels. – It was said of him that he acted as guide for the rebel Morgan when he passed through that section of country. Some of the soldiers had visited his premises and had committed some slight depredations. He forthwith visited camp and happened to fall in with Lieut. Courtright of Co. C, to whom he entered his complaints. The Lieutenant requested him to be seated on a stump and taking a pencil and a piece of paper from his pocket he proceeded to make particular inquiry into the respective losses which the said Florence had sustained on account of soldiers. From the manner of the Lieutenant Florence began to think he was now sure to get his pay for all the losses he had been subjected to.

“Now,” said the Lieutenant, “let me have the first item, and I don’t want you to name too high a price because you think our government is rich.”

“Well,” said Florence, “there were two bee gums, they were worth at least three dollars a piece.”

“Yes, that’s reasonable,” said the Lieutenant; “two bee gums at three dollars a piece, six dollars. Anything else?”

“I have missed one of my pigs, and my black boy Joe tells me that he saw two of your soldiers shoot it and carry it off.”

“But you don’t know that a black boy has no business to be a witness in this country? That’s no evidence that my soldiers shot your pig because a black boy saw them do it.”

“We’ll leave that out then,” said Florence, “as the pig was not worth over two or three dollars any how.”

“I don’t wish to be hard on you,” said the lieutenant, “so we will call the pig two dollars – one pig two dollars. Now what else?”

“I have lost some fifteen or twenty chickens and two old turkeys. The chickens were worth fifteen cents each and the turkeys about thirty cents.”

“Fifteen chickens at fifteen cents a piece, two dollars and twenty-five cens, and two turkeys at thirty cents a piece, sixty cents that’s down – now what else?”

“I don’t think of anything else just now.”

“Be sure,” said the lieutenant, “and get everything down now, for you may probably not have another chance.”

“Oh, yes, I came near forgetting some rails. They were used by your teamsters to lay across a mud hole.”

“How much were the rails worth?” enquired the lieutenant.

“I think the rails were worth at least a dollar, but you may call them seventy-five cents.”

“Well, then, rails seventy-five cents. Is that all?”

“That’s all I can think of now.”

“Then I’ll foot it up,” said the lieutenant, and after adding the several items together he announced the result – “Eleven dollars and sixty cents.” Now Mr. Florence if that is all you will lose in this war you will be the luckiest man in the whole South. Get out of this camp as soon as your legs will carry you.”

And Florence obeyed the instructions of the lieutenant forthwith.

[TO BE CONTINUED.]

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The County Convention.

            The Republican Union citizens of the county will bear in mind that Wednesday next, September 6th, is the day appointed by the Central Committee for them to assemble in their respective townships to elect delegates to the County Convention which meets on the following Saturday in this city. We trust that the friends of the Government will be alive to the interests and importance of the good cause. Let there be a general turn out, and in the selection of delegates let the voice of the people be heard. So far everything indicates success. Harmony, good feeling, and confidence in the administration prevails in the party. Let no side issues or personal considerations be introduced, but let all be animated by that earnest, loyal and patriotic spirit which has carried us through the war so successfully and gloriously.

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            → The Bushnell Press states the population of that town to be 1456, as established by the late census. John O. C. Wilson, the man who took the census for this city, is waiting for the citizens to raise him ten dollars before, he will give them the figures. Who will give the old man a dime?

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            → The Eagle man caught a Republican the other day by a button-hole, and in pathetic strains presented to him the claims of his paper. The Republican was a kind and tender-hearted man, and soon the tears started in his eyes, and taking a dollar from his pocket he gave it to the accomplished editor and told him he might send the paper to him six months. Every time that subscriber reads the paper he has his little boy to hold it up before him with the tongs, as he will not touch a paper that ever favored secession.

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            → The Bushnell Press says there is a butter famine in that town. The epidemic passed through this place but it has now considerable abated.

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The Iowa Soldiers.

            The following are the resolutions passed by the soldiers convention recently held in Iowa:

Resolved, That we, the soldiers of Iowa, never have affiliated, and never will affiliate with the copperheads of Iowa in any political capacity whatever.

Resolved, That, leaving the question of negro suffrage in abeyance, we will support the nominee of the Republican Convention, held at Des Moines on the 14th of June, 1865.

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Soldiers’ Dinner.

            On Thursday of last week a free dinner was given by the patriotic citizens of Spring Creek to the returned soldiers of the county. A general invitation was extended to all soldiers but it was not generally circulated.

We are indebted to L. A. Simmons for a report of the proceedings. The assembly met at a beautiful grove near the residence of J. D. Hainline, Esq. There were twelve or fifteen hundred persons present, including some three hundred soldiers. – The “boys in blue” assembled at the residence of Mr. Griffith and selected Col. T. K. Roach to take command. He organized a battalion and marched to the grove. Rev. Mr. Kirkpatrick made an address welcoming the soldiers home, which, although brief, was pointed and cordial. Capt. Brink and Lieut. Simmons replied in behalf of the returned soldiers, having been selected for the purpose when organizing at Mr. Griffith’s. Next came the dinner, abundant and excellent, abounding with the good things the country affords. The table was waited on by the fair ladies who spared no pains to please all. The dinner was enjoyed hugely; especially by the men who had so recently been confined to army rations.

After dinner Lieut. J. G. Waters was called out and entertained the audience with an excellent speech. Next came Col. Roach, who before he closed mentioned the matter of building a monument in this county sacred to the memory of all soldiers who have fallen in battle or by disease during the war. Alex. Blackburn, Sr., was next called upon who made some pertinent remarks in regard to the erection of a soldier’s monument, and offered the following resolution, viz:

Resolved, That we are in favor of erecting a monument in McDonough county which shall contain the name and regiment of each soldier who has been killed or died of disease or wounds while in United States service from this county.

This resolution was unanimously adopted.

Mr. Blackburn moved that a committee of three be appointed to prepare an address to the citizens of McDonough county on this subject, to publish said address in the county papers and designate a day for the people to meet in mass meeting at Macomb and organize a “Soldier’s Monument Association.” This motion was unanimously carried, and Col. Roach, Capt. Ervin and Capt. Griffith were selected as the committee.

The exercises of the day closed by the return of the flag to the ladies of the Good Templar’s Lodge, at Spring Creek, which had been presented by them to the company raised n that neighborhood for the 124th Ills. Col. Roach made the speech returning the fag, and Capt. Brink replied on behalf of the ladies.

The day was passed very happily, all seeming to enjoy the festivities greatly. – It was one of the happiest days we have ever enjoyed. Good will to all and the greatest cordiality prevailed. We hope our readers will look out for the address shortly to appear and give a hearty approval to the effort to organize a Soldier’s Monument Association.

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            The Medical Society of McDonough Co. will meet in Macomb, Ill., on Wednesday, Sep. 6, 1865.

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Public Schools.

The Public Schools will commence in the Ward school houses of this city on Monday the 11th inst., 1865.

By order of Board of Inspectors

J. W. Blount, Sec’ty.

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Religious Notice.

There will be religious services in the Methodist Church Saturday next, at 2. P. M., and 8 in the evening. Baptism and the Lord’s Supper will be administered Sabbath at the morning service.

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Lost.

Aug. 28th, a gold bracelet, marked “Maggie.” The finder will be suitably rewarded by leaving at this office or at the post office.

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Sold Out.

S. H. Williams, north side of Jordan’s bank, has sold his stock of dry goods, &c. to Wm. C. Banks, late of Savannah, Mo. Mr. B. is a thorough-going business man, and has tact, energy and enterprise, and no doubt will make his stand the popular place with all who wish to purchase any article in the dry goods line.

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Watches, Jewelry, &c.

J. H. Wilson, on the north side of the square, is well supplied with everything in his line, and can guarantee satisfaction to all who favor him with their custom. Mr. Wilson is particularly expert in repairing or cleaning watches, clocks, &c.

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Multim in Parvo.

C. C. Chapman &Co. have purchased the stock of Books, Stationary, &c. of Willie Wyne at the Post Office, and are continuing the business at the same place. – They have on hand the usual variety and sell at low prices.

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Horrible Accident.

Lizzie Scott, a little daughter of Henry Scott living near Pennington’s Point, in this county, was terribly mangled one day last week by being caught in a threshing machine. Both thighs were fractured and the flesh much torn, and two fingers mashed, besides severe bruises about the head. Drs. Bayne and McDavit of this place were called, who inform us that there is but little prospect of her recovery.

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The First Arrival.

Dernham & Jeilinger, the enterprising clothing merchants on the west side of the square, have just received a large and splendid stock of clothing from the eastern markets. See their advertisement.

August 26, 1865

Macomb Eagle

HISTORY OF THE 84TH REGI-
MENT ILL. VOLS.

BY L. A. SIMMONS.

[CONTINUED.]

            The morning of the 27th was foggy and very little advance was made until near noon. About this time the enemy were driven from the town, and the army advanced along the pike some skirmishing in the advance. We halted for the night near Stewarts Creek, some five miles from Lavergne, and ten miles from Murfreesboro. It had rained all the afternoon and we thought we were having a pretty rough time of it. Our camp was on the very same camp ground of one so lately occupied by the enemy that the fires were not yet out. The creek was about a mile in our front and we could see the camp fires of the enemy across the bluffs on the opposite side. On the morning of the 28th we moved to the brow of the hill, half a mile from the creek, and formed in line of battle, where we remained all day, the enemy’s pickets in full view upon the opposite bluffs. On the morning of the 29th the 86th Indiana formed in a line of battle on our right, and we advanced, our left resting on the pike. We waded the creek about waist deep, and advanced down the pike in line of battle. We heard heavy skirmishing several miles to our right, and we knew the whole army was in motion. We marched in line of battle all day, our brigade (3d) arranged as follows: Mendenall’s (4th U. S.) Battery on the pike, 84th Ills., 36th Indiana and 23d Kentucky in front line of battle; 6th and 24th Ohio in the second line of battle, some 80 or 100 yards in the rear. Two companies of each advance regiment were four or five hundred yards ahead as skirmishers, and three or four times during the day were engaged, but as soon as a gun of the battery could get into position the enemy fell back. At dusk we were about two miles from Murfreesboro, and within about a mile of Stone’s River, our Regiment’s left resting on the pike, our right in the edge of a thick cedar grove, the 36th Indiana in the cedars, the 23d Kentucky fell back on a line with the 24th and 6th Ohio. Immediately in front of our Regt. was a cotton field of forty acres at the southeast corner of which a very large brick house was burning when we came up. It was reported that the enemy set fire to the outbuildings to make room for a battery and the house caught fire accidentally from them. The railroad from Nashville runs a short distance to the left of the pike, opposite where we lay, and crosses the pike some sixty rods below the cotton field; from this intersection of the railroad and pike to the river is about half a mile. The river is very crooked, and the bend where the pike crosses is the nearest point to Murfreesboro. The railroad for a mile or more before its intersection with the pike, runs nearly parallel with the general course of the river.

On the morning of the 30th the 6th and 24th Ohio took position about 150 yards in our advance and were skirmishing all day. On our right we heard constant skirmishing, occasionally artillery and once in the afternoon quite an engagement took place. We then understood that Gen. McCook was getting his corps into position.

We had two men wounded in skirmishing yesterday, and today the 6th and 24th Ohio lost several men. The enemy had a line of sharpshooters lying behind the railroad in rifle pits, which harassed our front line, and many a ball during the day whistled through the lines of the 84th. We knew a great battle was about to be fought and the boys were anxious for the ball to open. On the morning of the 31st the second brigade came up and relieved the 6th and 24th Ohio, and our brigade was retired about three hundred yards.

At daylight the fight had commenced on the extreme right of the army and gradually grew nearer, and partly to our rear. At 8 1-2 or 9 o’clock stragglers and runaways began to come from the right who said their regiments and brigades were cut all to pieces. It was evident that the whole army had been flanked during the night and we afterwards learned that General Johnson’s division was surprised and cut to peices, almost without firing a gun. Our front was now changed to the west and we lay parallel with the pike about seventy-five yards from it; the 6th and 24th Ohio in our front, in very thick cedar woods. Now come a host of fugitives from the broken corps on our right. Terrible sight! hundreds, yes thousands of men, many of whom had thrown away guns, cartridge box and knapsacks, each looking as though death was each moment expected, terror the only expression upon their countenances, as through our lines they came, on a run or a brisk walk, panting from fear and fatigue, and they could not and would not be rallied. Soon the firing told that the enemy were sweeping all before them, and coming directly upon us, from our new front and right. Each moment the crowd of refugees increased in number, each moment the firing became more rapid and nearer to us, till the advance regiments of our brigade, the 6th and 24th Ohio, were engaged, and for a few minutes we hoped they would be able to hold the thick cedar woods. They fought well a short time, but soon began to fall back. Their officers tried in vain to rally them, but they were rapidly getting into confusion and a run. Before they came out of the woods, our regiment had laid down to be out of range of the shower of balls that whistled over and around us. On came the 6th and 24th Ohio Volunteers in full retreat. Our officers joined in trying to rally the 24th, a part of which passed directly over our Regiment, but could not prevail upon but few to stop and fall in with us. They rallied and formed forty yards in our rear. Two batteries now opened, throwing shell and grape directly over us. Soon the enemy came out of the woods about three or four hundred yards in our front. Our boys sprang up with a loud shout and gave them a volley, then fell and loaded and fired at will. We were partly protected by a low ledge of rocks, and the boys fired as fast as they could load, and with the help of the batteries drove the enemy back into the woods, and soon after their fire ceased. The leaden shower which had fallen like hail, for at least an hour, for a time ceased, and we hoped the foe was effectually repulsed. While we were thus engaged, we had been exposed to a cross fire from a regiment of the enemy, who had advanced up the pike, on the left hand side. We had several men wounded while in this position, but none killed.

Shortly after the enemy were drive back – our front was changed by a let half-wheel, and we marched forward very nearly to the position owe occupied on yesterday, and during the night. Across the cotton field on the left hand side, (west) of the pike, a Regiment of the enemy had taken position, lying down, and on our right, which was in the edge of the woods, we could see a heavy force apparently coming upon the brigade at our right. Our Regiment opened a brisk fire upon these, as soon as it came into this position, which told upon the Regiment across the pike, as we could easily see. After a few minutes, Col. Grose, commanding the Brigade retired the right of our Regiment to make room for a battery which swept the advancing columns of the enemy as they charged up towards the cedar woods. The regiments immediately on the right of ours, fired briskly for a few minutes, but for some reason, fell back, fighting steadily as they came. Now the enemy came, into the cedars and the balls came upon us in a perfect shower from that direction. Our Regiment was now greatly exposed, especially the extreme right for the enemy were coming in upon us through the thick cedars giving us a perfectly enfilading fire. Here we laid under a most withering and destructive fire for some time, perhaps half an hour, and when the enemy were within about forty yards, the right was retired so as to front the enemy, and fought desperately, every man working as though his life depended upon his own exertions. The enemy continued to advance, and were gradually coming into our rear, and our Regiment was again retired to a low ledge of rocks, and here they fought some thirty or more minutes longer. The “Board of Trade” battery was now throwing shell, grape and canister over our right and Mendenall’s battery over our left, sweeping the trees, underbrush, and the advancing enemy down at each discharge. The enemy were giving us a most galling fire as we lay in this position, the balls falling like hail in a heavy storm. At last, when we had been the only Regiment west of the pike for some thirty minutes or longer, the order came to retire, which was heard and obeyed by the left and center, and afterwards the companies on the right followed across the pike, and then the railroad. The Regiment was now in considerable confusion, from the fact that both wings had been severally retired, and the left and centre had the start of the right. The Board of Trade battery saved us very much, as we were falling back, and deserves great credit for the pertinacity with which they held their position by the railroad. Here twenty five of our Regiment fell dead, and scores were wounded. The enemy found the fire too hot for them, and about the time we fell back, they retired into the woods. Our Regiment rallied on the west side of the railroad where they were under the fire of one of the enemy’s batteries, planted on the opposite side of the river, so we were marched back some distance, say half a mile northwest, into the woods, where we stacked arms, and rested. Tears coursed down the cheeks of our brave Colonel, when he counted only one hundred and thirteen guns in the stacks, and not a few cheeks that had not blanched in battle, were moistened with manly tears. But some were getting their wounded friends from the field, and some were wandering about trying to find the balance of the Regiment. The Regiment was not engaged in the fight again that day, it had been under heavy fire for more than five hours, and was badly cut to pieces, but the actual loss we could not then determine. The stand made by our brigade seems to have turned the tide of battle. Other divisions rapidly came to the assistance of Gen. Palmer’s division, and the enemy was driven back nearly to the river that evening. Our Regiment was not again brought into action, and when night came we laid down to rest thinking of the old stanza,

“The bugles sang truce, the night clouds had lowered,
The sentinel stars set their watch in the sky,
And thousands had sunk to the ground over-powered
The weary to sleep, and the wounded to die.”

Alas! how many were dying, every hour of that long, chilly comfortless night; for we were so situated that fires were not allowed, and therefore suffered severely from cold. The next day, Jan. 1st, but little fighting was done, though there was a great deal of maneuvering for position, and some heavy cannonading. Our regiment [fold] the river, all day, and were not engaged. The wounded were being collected at hospitals, and numbered thousands. On Friday, 2nd, General Van Cleve’s division crossed the river nearly opposite where we had the hard fight on Wednesday, and advanced a short distance toward Murfreesboro. Our brigade crossed and took position on a hill, as a reserve, the left of the 84th rested on the river bluff, and the right extended out across the hill, an open field in front, the 6th Ohio and 36th Ind., in the same line of battle. The 23d Ky., and 24th Ohio nearly at right angle with the 36th Ind., fronting east, or a little southeast. In the afternoon Gen. Van Cleve’s division made a slight advance, and were attacked by Gen. Breckenridge with five brigades of infantry, some artillery and a heavy force of cavalry. Van Cleve’s division fought bravely a short time and then fell back, brigade by brigade, losing most of their artillery – part of it crossing the river where our main force lay. Out of the woods into the open fields in our front they came, in the greatest possible confusion. The whole division was in full retreat, and taking one of those terrible stampedes which an army will when routed and pressed by the enemy. Each man seemed to be looking out only for himself, and making every possible effort to get out of danger. Out of the woods, pursuing them came the brigades of the enemy in most splendid line of battle, their colors flying and apparently secure of an easy and complete victory.

The 3d brigade had made a slight breastwork of logs, &c., behind which it was lying, and not a shot was fired until the enemy was within about three hundred yards. Then the 84th Ill., and 6th Ohio raised with a yell and gave them a volley, then loaded and fired at will. The balance of the brigade (24th Ohio, 36th Ind., and 23rd Ky.,) fell back in considerable confusion, perhaps owing to the fact that they had lost most of their field officers on Wednesday. Soon the several batteries massed by order of General Rosecrans, on the opposite bank of the river began to pour a heavy fire into the enemy. At our first volley the enemy wavered, and soon began to fall back. The 84th Ills and 6th Ohio now sprang over their breast works with a yell that was heard three miles, and charged on the enemy, who were soon in full retreat. They advanced but a short distance at first, fearing to expose the weakness of the reserve. Soon the balance of the brigade rallied as also did Van Cleve’s Division and after the enemy they went, into the woods, retaking the batteries lost, and one gun of the famous Washington battery of the enemy. The loss of the enemy in the open field and woods was immense. We were over the field in the evening and the dead were lying in heaps, and hundreds of wounded were on every side. The 84th getting short of ammunition, pursued the enemy only half a mile in the woods, and then retired to their breastworks, and remained there during the night. They had one killed and three severely and several slightly wounded, in this days battle and in the evening all were in fine spirits; the reverse of Wednesday was scarcely remembered in view of the brilliant success of today, which had virtually decided the battle of Stone River.

On Saturdy there was little fighting done, some cannonading, at intervals during the day, and a sharp engagement about dark, in which a regiment or two drove the enemy out of the front line of their intrenchments. Sunday the enemy were evidently withdrawing, and our advance entered Murfreesboro, about four o’clock. Our regiment remained near the battle field until the 7th. On Monday those who fell on the field were buried, and their graves fenced in with logs. The wounded were collected at one hospital where there were few preparations for their comfort, but here their wounds were speedily dressed.

Our Colonel exhibited the greatest coolness and bravery during the whole action. On Wednesday he sat on his horse in the thickest of the fight watching every movement, and no more excited than though engaged in an ordinary lawsuit. When brave Geo. Yocum fell, Col. Waters rushed to the spot, seized the colors, and brought them from the field. In the fight on Friday he was the first to leap the breastwork and lead the charge. The success of Friday is to a great extent due to him. Our Lieut. Col., like the Colonel, was brave and ever at his place. He was knocked from his horse by a shot, which would have pierced his heart had it not been for the steel plates in his vest. He was bruised by the fall as well as by the bullet. Maj. Morton, too, was ever present, cool calm, and collected in the moments of greatest peril. He had one horse killed and one badly wounded under him, on the 31st[?], and was slightly wounded in the left knee. Col. Waters got a ball through his hat on Friday. Serg’t Maj. Frierson too, was at his post in each day’s fight, doing his whole duty. The conduct of the Regiment while under fire, astonished the old regiments of the brigade, and the84th received not a few compliments from officers of high rank who witnessed the engagement.

[Fold] time was acting Regimental Quartermaster, (Lieut. Roe having resigned, Nov. 18) deserves much credit for his incessant exertions in bringing up supplies; by running his wagon trains day and night, he was able to keep the Regiment as well supplied with rations, as they were when in camp.

Our entire loss in this battle was as follows:

Killed on the field and died of wounds,   58
Severely and seriously wounded,            106
Taken prisoner, at Hospital and missing, 6

Total loss                                                       170

Besides these there were at least forty others, slightly and very slightly wounded, who were not reported, indeed, there were very few men who did not carry from the field, some mark of the deadly Minnie upon their persons or clothing.

(To be Continued.)

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Important to Soldiers – Don’t Sell
your Discharge.

            Sharpers and speculators are in the market endeavoring to buy up soldiers’ discharge papers, offering what appears like a very liberal price. Of course they have a motive in making these purchases, and that motive is – profit. They are moving in the matter in anticipation of future bounties to discharged soldiers, of course; and we advise all our brave boys to hold on to their discharges – if they are worth anything to sharpers, they are worth just as much, and a little more, to them.

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            Illinois Soldiers. – By a statement published in the Springfield Journal it appears that there are still 55 Illinois regiments in the service – 43 infantry and 12 cavalry. Also one battery – Cogswell’s which is at Montgomery, Ala.

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            Hawkins & Philpot still continue to take ambrotypes, photographs, and all other kinds of pictures in the most approved style of the art. These gentlemen can truly boast that their work cannot be surpassed by any artist in the State. If you doubt it go to their rooms and see for yourself.

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            → We have been informed that a travelling agent for the Eagle has represented that the history of the 84th regiment, now being published in the Eagle, was first offered to this paper and was refused. We wish to say that there is no truth in this representation. – Journal.

For the information of the Journal we will state that we have never employed a traveling agent for the Eagle, and if there is any person so representing himself he is doing so without our knowledge. What the Journal says about the History is correct. The publication of it was never offered to him.

August 25, 1865

Macomb Journal

LIFE IN THE ARMY.

Being the Observations and Experiences
of a Private Soldier.

By J. K. MAGIE.

CHAPTER VI.

(Continued.)

            It was about noon, on the 15th of October that our regiment reached Beech Fork. Here we turned from the road into a large meadow where we made preparations for camping. The men were not very tired, but many of them were exceedingly hungry. The country hereabouts looked more promising and better improved than any we had seen since leaving Louisville, and the boys looked with longing eyes at the fat porkers and blooming pullets which roamed at pleasure over the neighboring farms. There were numerous negroes hanging around the camp very eager to give any information that the soldiers might ask for respecting the location on their master’s premises of flour, hams, butter, molasses, &c. But the men were always particular to enquire respecting the Union principles of their master’s, as they had no disposition to disturb the larder of any genuine Union citizen. It was soon ascertained that in the immediate vicinity of our camp lived a noted and wealthy secessionist named Gardner. He was the owner of a large flouring mill near his residence and had numerous negroes about him. His negroes reported him as a violent secessionist who had but recently entertained rebels at his house, and who had kept his mill running night and day to furnish flour for the rebel army. Although it was against the positive instructions of the colonel and higher officers, the men concluded it was but just and right to levy a contribution on old Gardner, and accordingly there commenced a general chicken chase. The 91st Ill. was camped in the same field with us, and there appeared to be a rivalry between the two regiments as to which should secure the larger share of chickens, turkeys, &c. Before night there was not a hen or a fowl of any kind left on Gardner’s place. – That same night, or early next morning, the boys entered his smoke house, his cellar and his mill, and they supplied themselves with meat, potatoes, molasses, flour, honey, &c. The officers in the meantime appeared to be conveniently absent, or asleep in their tents, but one thing I noticed, they had the same for breakfast about that time that the men enjoyed, and plenty of it.

We remained at camp on Beech Fork two days. In the meantime we recruited our health and strength in a remarkable degree. On Friday morning we pulled up stakes and took up our line of march for New Haven, a little town eight miles distant in a southerly direction. We reached that place about three o’clock in the afternoon and camped in a meadow on the banks of a stream called the Rolling Fork. A railroad bridge at this point was gone, having been burned by the rebels a few days previous. I found New Haven to be rather a pleasant village of about 600 inhabitants. It contained a number of staunch Union citizens. Among these I made the acquaintance of one Dr. Elliott, who had stood out boldly and unflinchingly from the first as an uncompromising Union man. The rebels had had him under arrest during their occupation of that part of the country, and had taken from him nearly a thousand dollars worth of property, for which they paid him in their worthless confederate currency. The Doctor related to me many of the trials and annoyances which the Union men of that section had been subject to since the breaking out of the war, but the loyalists had maintained their supremacy throughout, and treason was at a discount in that locality. When Bragg passed through New Haven with his army he left a detachment of 400 rebel cavalry to guard the town. These were camped on the Doctor’s premises only a few rods from his house. The secessionists were just then jubilant. They appeared to think the country was theirs forever. They arrested a number of Union citizens and after keeping them under guard a day or two would let them depart. Among these was one Dr. Wilson, who lived about three miles from New Haven. He was brought into the camp of this detachment of cavalry where he was kept about twenty-four hours. The Doctor was vigilant in thought and observation while a prisoner, and as soon as he was released he rode with all haste to Elizabethtown, about twenty miles distant, which place was then occupied by a Federal regiment of cavalry. He reached there just at night and laid before the Col. of the regiment a plan of the rebel camp, and the approaches to it, and desired the Colonel to let him have a sufficient number of men and he would lead them himself and take the whole camp prisoners before morning. His request was complied with, and just about daylight the next morning at the head of 600 Union cavalry he surrounded the rebel camp and took every man of them prisoner without the firing of a gun. These rebels were under the command of one Col. Crawford of Georgia, who formerly represented a district in that State in Congress. He appeared very much mortified and chagrined at the capture, while the men appeared to be very indifferent about it. The prisoners were marched off forthwith to Elizabethtown, from whence they were forwarded to Louisville.

On Sunday morning, Oct. 19th, our regiment again received marching orders, but it was about noon before it got started. – Our destination was understood to be Lebanon, a point some twenty-five miles distant in a south-east direction. We had made about three miles when our advance guard met a bearer of dispatches with information that the notorious Morgan with about 2,000 mounted men was marching toward us. We were ordered back to New Haven, where we had left the 91st regiment, and where we expected to make a stand and fight if we were attacked. A good position was selected, pickets thrown out, and the fighting spirit aroused. About 9 o’clock in the evening we received another dispatch ordering us to proceed forthwith to a railroad bridge on Rolling Fork, about four miles distant, between New Haven and Boston, which the rebels in their general destruction of briges, by some unaccountable freak had spared, and which it was thought Morgan would destroy if not prevented. The two regiments reached the bridge in the course of the night. The dispatch which ordered us to this place was brought us by Lieut. Blandin of Co. C, and had been received by telegraph at the Beech Fork crossing, where companies A and C of our regiment were still located. – It was understood that Morgan was marching westward, and it was not known at just what point on the Railroad he would strike. Early the next morning we received word that the telegraph wires had been cut at Boston. Of course there was much excitement in camp. The companies at Beech Fork had commenced the day before to fortify and had about completed a strong fort built of logs and dirt. Our forces at Rolling Fork bridge also commenced fortifying. About two o’clock we got word that the rebels were marching into Boston. It appears that Morgan made no halt at Boston, but proceeded on about three miles where he camped for the night. In the course of the evening the main body of our forces reached Beech Fork, upon hearing which Morgan broke camp and tied toward Elizabethtown, which place he reached in the course of the next day, where his men broke open the post-office, robbed the letters, and committed other depredations. – A Union cavalry force of two or three thousand passed along next day in pursuit of Morgan, but he succeeded in giving them the slip.

Our regiment now went into regular camp at Beech Fork. The 91st regiment started a day or two afterward for the Louisville and Nashville railroad, and the different companies were stationed along the line of the road to guard bridges. After a few days our regiment was disposed of in like manner along the line of the Lebanon Branch railroad.

[TO BE CONTINUED.]

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Wolves in Sheeps’ Clothing – Beware of Them.

            Those who have watched the course of the Democratic party for the last four years well know that that party has been the fierce, bold and outspoken enemy of all those who were in favor of subduing the rebellion by armed force. From the commencement of the war to the day of the surrender of Lee’s army they did not hesitate to heap the vilest slanders upon every supporter of the Government. In this county it will be remembered that the Democratic organ advised Democrats to stay at home, and to let the abolitionists do the fighting. And not only did the organ spit its venom upon the soldiers and all who claimed to be the soldiers friends, but it went so far in its hate to attack the reputation and character of the soldiers’ wives, by uttering the meanest and vilest insinuations against their chastity. And, not only this, the party held public meetings at which they denounced all upholders of the war, and passed resolutions in substance declaring all soldiers to be common murderers. – They refused, where they had the power, to bestow the elective franchise upon the soldier, and they went before the people last fall with the declaration emblazoned upon their banners that the WAS WAS A FAILURE. But now since the war has proved a SUCCESS, and the Union army has returned home in triumph, these same men who denounced soldiers as murders, who discouraged their enlistment, and who slandered their families in their absence, are claiming extraordinary friendship for soldiers. They are wolves in sheep’s clothing. They would deny to-day the soldier his vote, the same as they did while he was away fighting the battles of his country, if they had the power. Their only object is to secure the soldier’s vote. They have reason – and very good reason too – to believe that the soldier has no sympathy with them or their party, and hence it behooves them to make some efforts to conciliate them, and this they do by making great pretensions to friendship, and giving them much notice. This would be all well enough if that party had given some signs of repentance. If they should come out manfully and honestly, and say to the soldier – “We were wrong in the course we pursued in reference to the war, and you were right. We now see our mistake, and are ready to make all atonement for the errors of the past.” If they should do this in a spirit of honesty they would be entitled to some consideration and respect, but they won’t acknowledge a mistake; they are in fact the same enemy to the soldiers they always were. Look at their course in this county. It is still fresh in recollection how the Democratic Board of Supervisors spurned the application of a poor, maimed soldier, and then appointed John O. C. Wilson to take the census of this county – a man whose sympathies have been with the South all through the war. Hungate was elected by the Democrats last fall as Circuit Clerk, but he is careful to employ no soldier as clerk in his office. The same can be said of the other wing of the court house. Indeed, wherever they have the power they show no disposition to bestow their favors upon returned soldiers. All they want of the soldier is his vote, to boost themselves into office.

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Look Out for Them.

            The Chicago Times, the editor of which sheet suggested and approved the raising of an army in the North to slay and kill Union soldiers, is out with a circular addressed to its confidential friends in which it lays down a policy to be pursued by Democrats in order to attain “the reascendancy of the Democratic party.” This circular says that the “President should be powerfully supported” in his policy, and it then adds – “it is not precisely such a policy as you or we would propose.” Not by any means. They only propose to seem to approve what they really are opposed to until they can get the reins of power into their own hands, and then of course they will do as they please. But the sublimest piece of impudence is in the closing paragraph of this remarkable circular. Read it:

“Every soldier in our army to-day has been BOUGHT. We employ no longer ardent, enthusiastic volunteers, but MERCENARIES WHO HAVE BEEN PURCHASED at prices ranging from three hundred to one thousand dollars per capita. Will not this fact go far towards explaining why we now get so few victories – why every breeze from the battle-fields comes laden with disaster.”

Can any soldier read the above paragraph and have any other feeling for the writer of it than scorn and contempt? And yet, without making any apology for such insults, they now propose to become the political teachers of returned soldiers.

That same sheet, the Chicago Times, has been, and still is, the recognized organ of the Democratic party. The friends of that party in this city always buy the Chicago Times. It is their political Bible. In order that “returned soldiers” may know how that organ talked about our commander-in-chief, the great and good Abraham Lincoln, while they were away fighting the battles of our country, we publish one extract from the columns of that paper, bearing date, July 18th, 1864:

“HE (Abraham Lincoln) COULD NOT BE MORE WORTHLESS DEAD THAN HE IS LIVING, BUT WOULD BE INFINITELY LESS MISCHIEVOUS, AND HIS CORPSE REPULSIVE AS IT WOULD BE IN ITS FRESHEST STATE AND RICHEST AND MOST GRACEFUL HABILIMENTS WOULD YET BE THE MOST APPROPRIATE SACRIFICE WHICH THE INSULTED NATION COULD OFFER IN ATONEMENT FOR ITS SUBMISSION TO HIS IMBECILITY AND DESPOTISM.”

And yet the writers and endorsers of such language as the above now claim to be the “friends of the soldiers.”

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Was the War a Failure,

            “But the man who writes for the Eagle, and who claims to be the friend and champion of soldiers, insist that it was, for he objected to the first sentence which was printed on our Fourth of July bills which declared that the war was NO FAILURE.” – Journal.

Not quite so fast. “The man who writes for the Eagle” never made any such objection; but we will say that after he money was raised for the dinner to the soldiers then a few persons conceived the idea of inserting that clause for the purpose of insulting Democrats, and by this means induce them to withdraw from any participation in the matter, and then you would howl because they would not take part in it. If the Journal man will take the trouble to examine the list of contributions to the dinner he will find that the exclusive friends of the soldiers could only be induced to give from 25 cents to $5, while Democrats gave from $10 to $25. – You poor canting hypocrites, do you think you can deceive soldiers by such tricks? And while we are on this subject we would ask if the Journal man did not charge the executive committee $28 for doing TWELVE DOLLARS worth of work. – [Eagle.]

The Eagle says “after the money was raised for the dinner,” &c. Here is another specimen of the usual disregard of truth of that sheet. The same copy from which the handbill was printed, which was so objectionable to our fastidious copperhead neighbors, was furnished us by the executive committee and published in this paper, before a dollar scarcely was raised for the dinner. The Eagle says the clause “The War was No Failure” was inserted on purpose to inhibit democrats. What a confession! A Democrat, then, is insulted if you tell him the war was no failure. Listen to that “ye sun-browned heroes,” and don’t you ever dare to insinuate that the war was anything else but a failure, or perchance you might insult some patriotic Democrat, who is very anxious now to be your friend. What a commentary it is on the loyalty of Democrats when they openly confess that they don’t like those words, “The War was No Failure,” and even declare themselves insulted if the obnoxious sentence is paraded before their eyes.

The Eagle is moved to say something about the liberal contributions of Democrats, and thereby hangs a tale. It is a fact that the Democrats were unusually liberal in their fourth of July donations this year. It was about time that they should be. During the progress of the war they didn’t believe in the fourth of July, and hence were very economical of their dimes about the fourth of July. But they now begin to realize that the fourth of July is not played out, and they wished this year to make an impression, that they, too, respect that day. A prominent Republican told us that he expected this year to contribute ten dollars, but when he came to see the list, and found that certain Democrats who had hitherto contributed little or nothing to the fourth of July fund, had now put down their ten, fifteen and twenty dollars, he thought that the demand on him was not so great, and hence he contributed but five dollars. Just so with many other Republicans. They were surprised to see the liberal donations of Democrats, and hence felt that the call upon them was not so great.

But that last paragraph respecting the printing bill of the Journal could only have emanated from a wicked, malicious and unprincipled liar. The Eagle has a dozen or more editors, and it is difficult to decide which of them is the biggest liar. – But it was undoubtedly the head liar of the establishment that wrote that paragraph. – We made out a bill against the executive committee for advertising and printing amounting to $28, and then contributed $13 of the amount, and received in cash $15, which was all that we asked. The Eagle a few months since published a schedule of prices for advertising and printing, and if we had made out our bill according to that schedule it would have amounted to over $50. They advertised to do half-sheet posters at $6 per hundred. We printed 300 full-sheet posters for the executive committee for $18, much less than their advertised rates, and then threw off nearly 50 per cent. of that amount, and then the Eagle has the unparalleled meanness and audacity to say that we charged $28 for $12 worth of work. Verily, the Eagle is the devil’s own organ.

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            Those who have been readers of the Eagle for the last month or two have noticed in that paper a studied attempt to disparage our record as a soldier. They get up numerous little paragraphs in which they indulge in some vulgar allusion to that common disease in the army, the diarrhea, and speak as though we had been afflicted with it. It would have been nothing strange, or to our discredit, if such has been the fact. We have seen many a good soldier carried to his grave by that wasting disease. Our family mourns the loss of a beloved brother who was stricken down by that disease, while in the service of his country, and was buried by his comrades. While those who have a drop of loyal blood in their viens, or a spark of honorable, manly feeling about them, would scorn to make any ungenerous allusion to a sick and suffering soldier, the numerous editors who write for the Eagle seem to delight in throwing odium upon them and turning their misfortunes into ridicule. – All their allusions to us, particularly, are false, but their flings apply with equal force against all soldiers who have suffered with diarrhea. For the first two years we were in the service we never lost but three days by sickness, and then we were sick with a fever. We never lost a day or an hour in the service by diarrhea. We were in more than twenty fights and skirmishes, and if our conduct upon those occasions lacked the merits of a true soldier let our comrades so testify, and let the poor, miserable, cowardly, copperhead, stay at home sneaks, hold their peace.

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Corn Husks.

            A market is opening for corn husks. The new discovery for making paper from corn husks, so far as printing paper is concerned, is under the control of newspaper men, who propose to thoroughly test the discovery as soon as possible. They invite proposals from every farmer in the land for supplying them with clean, dry, sound husks, packed in bales weighing even hundred pounds, and delivered at railroad stations. If the experiment succeeds, as there is every reason to expect it will, a prompt and remunerative market will be opened for all the corn husks that are raised. They have never been accounted of any particular value for farmers for fodder, and a chance to dispose of them will open a field for agricultural enterprise. Mr. D. H. Craig, the agent of the associated press at New York, is the man to whom all proposals should be addressed.

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ATTENTION.

Ye Hungry!

            The attention of the HUNGRY, who visit this City on business or pleasure, is directed to G. K. HALL & CO’S

RESTAURANT,

East side of the Square. Everything in the eating line, such as Fresh and Cove OYSTERS, Beefsteak, Hot Coffee, Game, &c, &c., served up in the best style and at all business hours. Also, for sale, Confectionary of all kinds, Sweetmeats, Oysters by the Can, Jellies, Pies, Cakes, &c, &c.

Parties supplied with Ice-cream, Cakes, and Pies, on short notice.

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Delinquents.

Those who receive their paper this week marked with a cross X at the end of their names are notified that their subscription has expired and that no more papers will be sent unless the subscription is renewed. We are sorry to part with any of our subscribers, but we must observe the advance system.

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The Income List.

We publish upon our first page a partial list of those who pay income taxes in this county. We will complete the list next week. This list makes some curious developments. There are some who appear to have a very respectable income, who have hitherto been supposed to posse limited means, while others who are able to keep fast horses, and employ man-servants and maid-servants, testify that their income rises scarcely above $600 per annum. – Luther Johnson, our popular dry goods merchant, pays the largest income tax of all others in the county.

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Death of a Soldier.

A letter received by Mr. Wm. Hunter, of Chalmers township, from his son in Texas, mentions the death of John Pollock, late of Co. F, 84th Ill., and more recently transferred to the 21st Ill. We understand his friends live near Vermont, in Fulton county.

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A Fracas.

On Wednesday afternoon last some excitement was created in this city, near Brown’s Hotel, by a drunken copperhead named Webb, who we are told was once a soldier in the rebel army. He was loud in his denunciations of all soldiers, calling them a nigger-thieving set of abolitionists, and expressed a hope that the South would yet triumph. There were a few soldiers in the vicinity who gave him notice to keep his copperhead opinions to himself, but it appears that he did not heed their advice. His language and his conduct became at length so unbearable that a returned soldier named Wilfred Mitchell, who had the misfortune to lose an arm in the service, reached for the old sinner, and dealt him a blow that he will be likely to remember. He was finally carried off to some whisky shop by his sympathizing friends.

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            → The shows during the past week attracted to the city quite a large crowd. The weather was fine, and the performances about up to the average. The “police” were vigilant in preserving order, and there was only one fight at the show that we heard of. Some enterprising youths of the city borrowed a rather singular looking colt belonging to Dr. Blaisdell, and exhibited him as the Wooley Horse, from the Rocky Mountains, captured after a five days chase by the Comanche Indians. The Wooley Horse drew crowds of people, and the greenbacks rolled in upon the exhibitors in hand fulls.

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Sharp Practice.

One day last week a red-faced, portly looking man appeared on our streets in a buggy driven by two horses, having a driver seated beside him in a true aristocratic style. The team was stopped on the busiest side of our public square, and the aforesaid gentleman rose from his seat and in sonorous tones began to auction off a ten-dollar greenback. It was sold at length for about nine dollars. Then he proceeded to fling among the crowd which had began to assemble a lot of dimes and half dimes, saying he had more money than he wanted. At length he offered a lot of jewelry for sale, and proposed to give the purchaser back his money. A few persons bought some lockets or rings, at twenty-five or fifty cents a piece, and would them receive their money back, and at the same time retain the article purchased. This mode of buying and selling goods began to take with the crowd, and they all began to feel for their purses. At length the jewelry peddler rose to five dollars for his lockets, and rings, but what difference did that make when they got their money back. – By the time his price had risen to five dollars there were more than a dozen each with a five dollar bill in his hand, crowding and jostling against each other, anxious to be the first to hand over their money and receive a three-penny ring or a six-penny locket, for the same. The crazy pedlar coolly took all five dollar bills that were handed him, and gave to each a ring, or a locket, and then whipped us his horses and was out of sight in a short time, leaving about a dozen of the worst sold individuals that have been seen in this city in a long time. A careful estimate of his operations foot up about as follows;

Gave away to pressure crowd,                      $2,00
Value of brass trinkets sold,                            3,00
Received from verdant youth,                                  $50,00
Less money and trinkets                                                5,00

Leaving a net profit of                                                 45,00

This same game has been exposed and worn out in eastern cities, but we suppose there are a few in the West who don’t take the papers, anxiously waiting to be made victims.

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            → Dernham & Jehlinger are now receiving their fall stock of fashionable and serviceable clothing, and will appear next week with a new advertisement.

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            → The Bushnell Union Press comes to us now enlarged to a seven column paper, with an unusual amount of fresh reading matter. This new enterprise on the part of neighbor Swan will no doubt prove a profitable experiment.

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Get the Best.

It is now pretty well understood that in the purchase of boots and shoes, the best is always the cheapest. Ray, on the east side, is careful in the selection of his stock to get the best. He sells at the lowest possible figures, and is bound to please all customers. His stock of hats, and caps embrace all styles, and are sold low.

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Dry Goods and Carpets.

Wetherfold appears this week with a new advertisement. His sale room on the east side of the square is one of the largest and most commodious in the city, and is always filled with a large variety of the latest style of goods. The carpet trade at this establishment is becoming a very important feature, and the sales are increasing daily.

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Something New.

            We call attention to the advertisement of the Duplex Elliptic or double Spring Skirt. Though a recent invention, it has become very popular, and is rapidly obtaining the preference over other kinds in use. The rods in it are composed each of two delicate and well-tempered steel springs, which are ingeniously braided together edge to edge, the lower rods heavier, and having a double covering. This peculiarity of construction makes this skirt very strong and durable, and also so exceedingly flexible that it readily adapts itself to the form of the wearer, and allows of any amount of doubling and crushing without injury to its shape. These skirts are unquestionably the lightest, most desirable, comfortable and economical ever made. These are advantages which ladies, who have experienced the discomfort and inconvenience of single springs, will duly appreciate.

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            J. M. Browne, on South side of Public Square, has just returned from New York and Boston with the largest, cheapest and best stock of Boots and Shoes ever offered for sale here. He has also just received a large stock of Hats and Caps, which he is selling lower than any other house here. – Do not buy any goods in his line until you call and look over his stock. They you will be convinced that Browne is still ahead in the Boot, Shoe and Hat and Cap business.

August 19, 1865

Macomb Eagle

HISTORY OF THE 84TH REGI-
MENT ILL. VOLS.

By L. A. Simmons.

[Continued.]

            On the morning of October 1, 1862, the whole army encamped in and around Louisville, under command of Gen. Buell, started in pursuit of Gen. Bragg, who, it was ascertained, had commenced falling back towards Danville. The fourth Division (General Smith commanding), to which we were attached, with several others, moved out on the Bardstown pike. We had marched out but a few miles before we began to hear the boom of cannon a few miles in front of us – and being unaccustomed to military affairs, were hourly looking for an engagement. On the morning of October 8th, we had scarcely started from our bivouac on the Rolling Fork of Salt River, when the distant thunder of artillery announced that a battle had begun, a few miles to the east of us, near Perryville. The attack had been made upon McCook’s and Woods Divisions and the 4th Division (Gen. Smiths) and others which had started out on the same Pike, were rapidly hurried forward. About noon the lines of battle were formed on our right and and left, we were each moment expecting that the engagement would become general. Such, however, was not Gen. Bragg’s design, and he seemed to have his own way during the campaign. There was a smart skirmish in our front toward sunset, but we were not destined yet to enter into a general engagement. During the night, Bragg having severely handled McCook’s Division, again continued his retreat, and in the morning we pursued, moving in line of battle all day; the slowest and most tiresome manner of marching, and especially wearisome when the impression is forced upon the minds of all, as in this instance, that our commanders had been out-generalled. On the morning of the 10h we turned a little to the left and took the road from Perryville toward Danville, and at night, were sent out on Picket, where the enemy were directly in front, and sent back a shell or two, to notify us that they would contest our further advance that evening. It is related that an officer above the rank of Captain, and a Sergeant of Regiment, came in [fold] shelter behind the same stump, when the shells were heard in the air; but for this story we can not vouch. It is certain that the night was rainy and disagreeable, and that the rain poured down most mercilessly all the next day, while we held the same position, three miles from Danville. The 12th of October, is a day well remembered by all the Regiment; as the day we marched twelve or fourteen miles out and back again. After another day’s delay we marched through Danville, and encamped near Stanford, laid down weary at 9 o’clock in the evening, to be roused up at 12 o’clock and marched till morning, when there was a brief skirmish near Crab Orchard. We rested two hours, then marched on quite steadily all day, passing through Crab Orchard about two o’clock, and went on picket again at night. We were thinking this rather severe, but the next morning we were still more unkindly handled, for we were not recalled from picket until the column was in motion and had to march till near mid-day, before any opportunity was given to get breakfast. In the vicinity of Danville, we had passed through a very fine farming country, but now we were entering upon the rough hilly section along Rock Castle River, and here the enemy began to give us serious annoyance, by felling trees across the roads, so that the column could proceed but slowly. On the 17th we crossed Rock Castle River, and ascended when then seemed quite a mountain, known as “Wild Cat.” The ascent was about three miles, and as brisk a skirmish was kept up while we toiled toward the summit, as had been through the rough country, for two days previous. The same evening we went down the ridge on the opposite side; almost, it was said, into an ambuscade – came back to the summit, and after dark, were sent back, nearly to the place we had bivouacked the night before, to guard the ammunition trains. We now began to really suffer from scant rations, and for the ensuing twenty days, this was the constant complaint. On the 19th we advanced upon a road through the hills, appropriately named the “Winding Blades” to Nelsons Cross Roads, where we rested for the night, having for our supper nothing but a small ration of poor beef, without salt – not even a cracker or cup of coffee. From this point, the Regiment reached out toward Manchester sixteen of seventeen miles and back the same day, without a particle of food or a cup of coffee, until they returned late in the evening. Of course under such privations and hardships as these, our Regiment was rapidly reduced in numbers. Veterans might and did endure it much better, but it decimated the ranks of every new regiment on the campaign. From Nelson’s Cross Roads, after resting a day, we returned to Rockcastle River – rested there two days and then came back to Mt. Vernon. We were now convinced that the campaign was closed, that the pursuit of Gen. Bragg was abandoned, that he had reached Cumberland Gap, with the vast stores he had “foraged” in Kentucky. From Mt. Vernon we took the road to Somerset, and encamped the first night at Buck Creek. Early in the evening a cold, chilly rain set in, and we made the best shelter we could of brush and our single blankets, and built large fires, but could not make ourselves comfortable. Before 10 o’clock a snow-storm set in, and by daylight, at least a foot of snow had fallen. Our men were scantily clothed, for the weather had been very warm for a few days after leaving Louisville, and finding themselves overloaded, they had thrown away all except one suit, and many were now nearly barefooted, and some had been so unfortunate as to have their blankets stolen by the older regiments of the Brigade. We paid them in kind, before their term was out. But, this terrible morning, and the march that day in snow, water, slush and mud to Somerset, we must despair of trying to portray its hardships to our readers. But, we talked of Valley Forge and old revolutionary times, swallowed a cup of coffee and a few bits of “hard tack,” and dragged on twelve tedious miles. The wind blew cold and fierce from the North West, as we bivouacked about two miles south of Somerset, and while bringing in our armful of cedar boughs to build a shelter for the night, we noticed as we had frequently during the day blood-stained footprints in the snow – blood from the sore and lacerated and almost frozen feet of the soldiers. The next day scores were sent to the Hospital, some to never return to us again, many so worn down by fatigue and exposure that it required months of nursing and care to render them again fit for duty in the ranks. But after a day’s rest, in which a few dozen pairs of shoes were procured, we pushed on toward Columbia, which we reached on the third day, passing on the second day the battlefield of Mill Springs, where the rebel General Zollicoffer fell nearly a year before. At Columbia we rested two days, then took the road to Glasgow, which we reached on the second day, having marched twenty four miles the first and sixteen the second. And here again a large number were sent to Hospital at Bowling Green, where many of them remained until the next Spring. At this point, Adt. [fold] forty men who had been left sick at Quincy and Louisville. Here too, our teams came up bringing our tents and camp equipage, and having been well supplied with blankets, shoes, and stockings we were able to protect ourselves from the weather, and sleep comfortably, although the nights were cold and frosty. On the 8th day of November; we marched from Glasgow toward Gallatin about 25 miles, on the 10th crossed the State line, on the 12th passed through Gallatin and and crossed the Cumberland River at Gallatin Landing, – on the 14th reached Silver Springs, when we remained nearly a week. On the 19th we passed by the Hermitage and from the road could see the residence and grave of the Hero, Sage and Patriot – the immortal Jackson. Each Regiment spread its banner to the breeze in passing and loud calls were made for music by the soldiers; but musicians about this time were, in army parlance “played out”. A few miles further on, we encamped near Stone River, and were within two miles of the 16th Regt. Ills. Vols, in which we had many old friends, with whom we talked over “old times,” affairs at home, our brief army experience, and for a few days enjoyed ourselves vastly. The next week we moved camp, seven or eight miles, and our wreck of a Regiment went into winter quarters about three miles South East of Nashville on the Murfreesboro Pike. Yes, we had now but the wreck of a Regiment, we had left them at Hospitals by the wayside, all along the route, and now had only about four hundred out of nine hundred that started from Quincy Ill, who were able for duty. From the effects of this campaign, through Kentucky, our Regiment never recovered. It deprived us of more men than any battle in which we were engaged, it swept many into an early grave, it ruined the health of scores, but those who did endure its hardships were inured to the rough life of a soldier, and were seldom afterwards sick, or sore from hard marching. There are many incidents of this Campaign that we would gladly introduce gladly introduce into this record; but fear it will prove too tedious, abridge and condense it as best we may. Before we close, we will endeavor to show the actual loss of the Regiment, from the time we left Louisville, until we encamped near Nashville. We will also state the loss of each company, in each camp, battle and campaign, and the whole number of casualties during the whole term of service. We cannot close this chapter without remarking that throughout this campaign, our honored Colonel did all in his power to lighten our burdens, to secure all the supplies that could be obtained, and by his constant cheerfulness and sympathy, won the affection and admiration of every man in the Regiment. He was to us not a severe and rigid commander, but seemed an elder brother enduring with us all our hardships and privations, never anxious on his own account, but always for his Regiment.

CHAPTER III.

REORGANIZATION OF THE ARMY. THE MARCH
TO AND BATTLE OF STONE RIVER.

            About the middle of November, Gen. Buell having made a complete failure of the Kentucky campaign, was superceded by Gen. Rosecrans. – This announcement was received with shouts of joy throughout the whole army, for Gen. Buell had become very unpopular; yes, hated and dispised by all under his command, and after the battle of Perryville, as long as he had command, the soldiers cursed him more frequently than they discharged their muskets toward the enemy. Almost as soon as Gen. Rosecrans took command he organized a Pioneer Brigade, which was made up of two or three men from each company of each regiment in each division. This took from our Regiment about twenty-five men, and many of them were among the best we had. Gen. Rosecrans immediately reorganized the army, and without changing position, we were informed that our Regiment was in the 3rd Brigade (Col. William Gross commanding) of the 2nd Division (Gen. Souey Smith commanding), of the 21st Army Corps, under command of Maj. Gen. Crittenden. The brass band which had been organized with the Regiment was no longer allowed to remain a regimental band, but was detailed as a brigade band. – We were very proud of our band, one of the finest in the army, and were sorry to lose it, but there was no alternative. At the same time the Quartermaster and Commissary departments, which had heretofore been under the control and directions of one class of officers, were entirely separated, and ever after continued distinct “institutions,” each having its own officers and employees. We remained in camp near Nashville from November 26th, 1862, to December 26th, 1862 during which period we were constantly drilling, when not employed on other duty. Every fifth day the Regiment was on picket, and almost as often was sent out to guard forage trains or on a scout. On one of these expeditions, we believe it was on the 29th of November, our Regiment came very near getting into an engagement [fold] retired in good order. The event was ever afterward jocosely referred to as the “Battle of Apple Jack.” While in this camp we were well supplied with the usual army rations and furnished with all the clothing we desired. The camp seemed to be in a healthy location, but the health of our Regiment instead of improving, as had been anticipated, almost daily grew worse. – The sick list constantly increased instead of diminished, which must be attributed to privations and exposure endured on the march thither. The effect continued long after the cause was removed, as the heat of summer though caused by the more nearly vertical rays of the sun is more intense days, and often weeks, after the rays begin to fall less vertically upon the earth.

About the 1st of December Gen. Palmer superceded Gen. Smith in command of the 2d Division, which was especially gratifying to our Regiment as Gen. Smith was far from being popular, and Gen. Palmer was from our own State.

On the 2d of December Gen. Rosecrans had a grand review of the whole army under his command – and our Regiment, for the first time, took part in this necessary, but very wearisome, mode of army inspection. Several times the enemy, who were encamped in force near Murfreesboro, were reported advancing upon Nashville, and everything was placed in readiness for an attack; but these reports originated from scouting parties feeling for our lines, as the enemy’s advance posts were in the neighborhood of Lavergne, fifteen miles from Nashville. The weather during this month continued generally pleasant, though we had some snow and frequent rains. Every few days during the month, before Christmas, the men unable to march were sent off to hospitals, and from this, as well as other preparations, we were well aware that a general movement would speedily take place. On the morning of December 26th all the sick and ailing were sent off to Convalescent Camp and the remainder directed to be ready to march at 6 a. m., each man to carry only his overcoat and one blanket, and all our tents and camp equipage was left behind. About 7 a. m. our whole division and several others, in brief General Crittenden’s corps, moved out on the Murfreesboro Pike. We started on this march with 25 officers and 337 men, the remainder being in convalescent camps and hospitals. It was currently reported that Gen. Thomas and Gen. McCook were moving on the Nolansville pike, which we eventually learned was correct. Gen. McCook’s position was on the right, Gen. Thomas’ in the center and Gen. Crittenden’s on the left. – Gen. Palmer’s division was in the latter, and the 3rd, in which we were, was near the center of the corps. – Some 10 miles from Nashville the enemy’s pickets were driven, and a sharp skirmish was continued till we came in sight of Lavergne, 15 miles from Nashville, when the enemy made a stand. The 2d division was not engaged, and our brigade halted for the night, on the left of the pike, about 3 miles from town. It had rained nearly all day and continued a good part of the night.

[To be Continued.]

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Was the War a Failure.

            “But the man who writes for the Eagle, and who claims to be the friend and champion of soldiers, insists that it was, for he objected to the sentence which was printed on our Fourth of July bills which declared that the war was NO FAILURE.” – Journal.

Not quite so fast. “The man who writes for the Eagle” never made any such objection, but we will say that after the money was raised for the dinner to the soldiers then a few persons conceived the idea of inserting that Muse for the purpose of insulting Democrats, and by this means induce them to withdraw from any participation in the matter, and then you would howl because they would not take part in it. If the Journal man will take the trouble to examine the list of contributions to the dinner he will find that the exclusive friends of the soldiers could only be induced to give from 25 cents to $5, while Democrats gave from $10 to $25. You poor canting hypocrites, do you think you can deceive soldiers by such tricks? And while we are on this subject we would ask if the Journal man did not charge the executive committee $28 for doing twelve dollars worth of work.

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A Great Indian War Brewing.

            All the accounts from the Plains are to the effect that before the coming on of winter we shall have on hand the greatest Indian war we have ever fought. Since the massacre of the Cheyennes by Colonel Chivington, the Indians have been breaking out into constant hostilities, and hardly a day has passed for two months past that the overland telegraph wires have not been cut systematically at points usually ten or fifteen miles apart. This is a new feature, and indicates a general action on the part of the Indian tribes.

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            “If the writer of the above extract was any friend to the soldiers, he would not be inventing base and mean fabrications to disparage the honorable record of one of its number. – Journal.

This is the first time that we have ever heard of “soldiers” making an honorable record by heavy discharges in the rear.

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            The Shows. – There will be two big shows in town within a week; the Equescurriculum on Saturday and the Union Combination on Tuesday. The shows will no doubt bring in a large crowd of persons who will want either groceries, queensware, paints, oils, or those celebrated Buell boots and shoes, all of which can be had at the mammoth grocery store of Watkins & Co.

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            → Magie says he never was afflicted with that terrible disease and that his pants only shows that he was a victim of “misplaced confidence.”

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            → Butter is selling at the low price of 40 cents per pound.

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            Pitts! Pitts!! Pitts!!! – Farmers in want of a Threshing Machine will find it to their interest to look at the Pitts machine at Wadham & Stowells’, N. W. corner square. They are also receiving a large lot of the Princeton Sorgo Mills that gave such universal satisfaction last Fall. Give them a call before you buy.

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            → Those of our friends who may desire any article of jewelry, or who wish any repairing of such articles, would find it to their advantage to call upon Mr. J. H. Wilson, on the north side of the square. He is an experienced workman, always punctual, and his selection of American and Swiss watches, jewelry and notions, have been selected with an eye strictly to the interest of buyers.

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            Harvest Time Over. – Our farmers are bringing in their products more freely and we notice many of them go to S. J. Hopper’s New York Clothing Store and are highly pleased with prices and the goods they buy there. Hopper’s [?] his clothing and hats very low and has a fine trade.

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Pickles! Pickles!

            The subscriber has about 40 barrels of Pickles which he will sell at 50 cents per hundred delivered, or he will pack them at the same price provided the barrels and salt is furnished. All orders promptly attended to.

WM. HARKER.

August 18, 1865

Macomb Journal

LIFE IN THE ARMY.

Being the Observations and Experi-
ences of a Private Soldier.

By J. K. Magie.

CHAPTER V.

(Continued.)

            On Sunday evening, Oct. 6th, our regiment in connection with the 91st Illinois, received marching orders. The next morning soon after daylight we struck tents, but it was near 9 o’clock before we got started. The day was pleasant, and rather warm, and the roads were in excellent order. Our destination was Shephardsville, a small town on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, about 20 miles due south of Louisville. For a few miles south of Louisville the country was well improved, and occasionally dotted with elegant residences. – Before night we reached a country which was anything but beautiful and inviting. – The farms and farm houses that we saw looked as though they belonged to the last century. The fences were made of brush, or broken sticks, or piles of stone, and the houses were generally rude, home-made structures, inhabited seemingly by more blacks than whites. We could not see the one white man at work, but we saw numerous darkies, of both sexes, in the fields at work. The white men generally fled and secreted themselves on the approach of our army, fearing I suppose, arrest or conscription.

This was our first march in Dixie, and I think the boys of our regiment will always remember it. We had not marched over six miles before nearly every man felt utterly prostrated and unable to march another mile. Our knapsacks, guns, &c., felt as though they would weigh a hundred pounds. We made twelve miles that day, and camped at night in a beautiful grove or piece of woods which had been used a few days before as a rebel camp. Camp fires were soon burning, and there were busy preparations for a supper. The neighboring farms furnished a few chickens and mutton which were duly paid for, as confiscation was not then the order of the day, and Kentucky was not really a seceding State, although its loyalty about that time was of the suspicious stripe. A guard was stationed, and after supper those not on duty spread their blankets for a night’s rest. – The best feather beds at home were never more enjoyed than the blankets and ground were that night.

Our second day’s march was marked by no extraordinary incident. We started about eight o’clock in the morning and reached Shephardsville about noon. Our Sergeant-major, C. V. Chandler, and Elisha Morse, Adjutant’s clerk, walked through the day before. The 91st Illinois also made the trip the day before. Morse and Chandler had selected a good camping place a little east of town on the banks of Salt river, where we proceeded to erect tents. – [Fold] in the evening pickets were stationed at proper points with instructions to be on the alert, as the country thereabouts was pretty strongly tinctured with secession, and the rebels had just evacuated that part of the country, and Bragg’s army was not then over thirty miles distant. The pickets were instructed if they were fired upon to report immediately to camp, and the drum-major was authorized to beat the long roll upon the least cause of alarm. About ten o’clock, after the most of those in camp were wrapped in their blankets asleep, the firing of guns was heard in the distance, and a few affrighted messengers from the picket posts came rushing in with the information that they were attacked by the rebels. The long roll was sounded, and the call to arms was given. The officers seized their swords and pistols, and the men their guns, and in less than three minutes our regiment was in line of battle ready to meet Bragg’s whole army. There we stood for about half an hour, but Bragg didn’t come. The cause of the alarm was at length discovered. Four persons from company C, not being over weary from their twenty-mile march, were disposed to take a walk a mile or two from camp in the order that they might see what was to be seen on a moonshining night in that country. How they passed the picket line they know better than I do. While strolling about, as they informed me afterward, they happened to spy a good fat pig, and drawing their pistols, they ordered it to halt, but the pig paid no heed to the order, and so they thought it to be their duty to shoot it, which they did, and the pickets thinking they were fired upon rushed to camp and reported, and hence the commotion. The slayers of the pig were arrested while in the act desecting it, and were brought to camp and placed in the guard tent where they remained for several days, but were finally discharged without trial but with a great deal of reprimand. Some how or other that same pig was smuggled into camp and I was invited the next day to a slice of it.

Shephardsville was a miserable, dilapidated looking town, of about twenty or thirty houses. It was the county seat of Bullitt county. The bridge over Salt river at that place was destroyed by the rebels when they evacuated that part of the country, and it was now being rebuilt.

We remained at Shephardsville just one week. On Monday evening, Oct. 13th, two companies of our regiment, A and C, were ordered to proceed forthwith to the railroad crossing at Beech Fork, a mile or two south of the village of Boston in Nelson county. These companies marched nearly all night, reaching their destination some time the next forenoon. The distance was about twenty miles. The two regiments, 91st and 78th, left Shephardsville on the morning of the 14th, marching in a southerly direction. It was understood that our business was to guard the construction of bridges on the Lebanon branch of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, which had nearly all been burned by the rebels.

Our regiment on leaving Shephardsville marched very slowly. About noon we made a halt of some two or three hours in order to get some horses shod at a blacksmith’s shop by the road side. This gave us an excellent opportunity to gather and eat some wild grapes which grew in abundance in that vicinity. We marched only eight miles that day. About four o’clock we reached a little village called Belmont Furnace were we halted for the night. – This village contained about twenty small houses, but they were nearly all deserted. Before the war there were two or three large iron furnaces in operation there, but they were now closed, and the operatives had sought occupation elsewhere. As the whole town appeared to be pretty much deserted our boys ransacked it pretty thoroughly. In one of the buildings they found the remains of a village store, and among other articles was a barrel of loaf sugar, which of course went to sweeten their coffee.

A little incident occurred that night which was relished much by the boys. – The Colonel of the regiment some how or other got outside of the guard lines. I believe he had accepted the invitation of a neighbor to supper. About eleven o’clock he was making his way into camp when he was challenged by one of the sentinels with “Who comes there?” The Colonel replied that it was nobody but himself, and he was about to push by the guard, when that soldier informed him that nobody without the countersign could pass his line into camp. The Colonel scolded, threatened and swore, and then at length began to coax and plead, but the guard was firm, and it was not until the officer of the guard came around that the Colonel was permitted to enter the lines of the camp.

The next morning we got started by 7 o’clock. The weather continued pleasant, but the roads were very hilly stony. We met that morning about 9 o’clock three women upon horseback who were on their way to the battle field of Perryville, which battle had been fought about a week previous [obscured] they broke out into [obscured]. – They informed us that they had just received information of the death of the husband of one of the party at Perryville, and that her son had been mortally wounded at the same time. The father and son belonged to the 16th Ky. Infantry, and fell fighting for the Union cause. The old lady told us to go on and fill their places, and she prayed that success might attend us. – I believe that a number belonging to the 16th Ky. Inf. who had lived in that vicinity, fell at the battle of Perryville.

[To Be Continued.]

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            ‒ The law against killing prairie chickens in this State will be in effect until the 15h of the present month.

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Louisville Correspondence.

Louisville, Ky., Aug. 10, 1865.

            Dear Journal: – The storm has swept over us, and now that the dust and debris has cleared away, we are able to see clearly the result of the election which took place in Kentucky. In this District, the gallant General Rousseau is elected by the handsome majority of about 1500 votes. This much congratulatory. But, alas! those who thought that the black spot on the escutcheon of the nation was about to be wiped out forever by the election of a Legislature which would ratify the Constitutional Amendment forever prohibiting slavery in this nation, have met with a signal disappointment. Although the friends of “the institution” in Kentucky admit that it is as good as destroyed; and although the negroes now seem worthless both as freedmen and slave, still they are not going to gratify the “infernal Abolitionists” by legally abolishing it. No; much would they prefer to be harassed for their natural life.

What shape the negro question will now take, it is impossible to say. Heretofore hundreds have been freed every month, under the act of Congress which frees the wives and children of all who enlist in the army. But now that recruiting is stopped, of course this ceases.

According to our official report made by Brig. Gen. Brisbin, who has had charge of the matter for over a year past, the total number of negroes who have enlisted from Kentucky, is 28,818. The whole number of women and children made free by these enlistments is 72,055.

It seems that the stupendous war through which we have passed has made the people estimate human life very lightly. Why, murders are of almost daily occurrence here, and such ones, too, for atrocity, as would have shocked every member of the community a few years ago, and led to the offer of large rewards, and the hunting down of the [?] without delay. – Now, [obscured] beyond the publication of the facts in the newspapers. On last Saturday night the train which eft Jeffersonville at 10 o’clock, going north had proceeded but a mile or two before it saw the body of a man lying on the track. Investigation showed that he had been murdered and thrown there, and he was recognized as an employee of the Railroad Company. A little farther on the body of another man was found, in the same position. Is this not horrible, for a civilized community? Many of the citizens of this place, living up-town, would not return down after nightfall for a large sum of money.

Allow me to congratulate you, Mr. Editor, on the improvement in your paper. Now that the war is ended, the telegraphic news of the daily journals amount to just nothing at all. So the people in the interior have no use for them. Now it behooves them to give a generous support to their local newspapers, and encourage their publishers to make them what they should be – an index of the business and current events of their own county. You have my best wishes for your success.

A friend of mine, an eminent M. D. of this city, had a very rich joke played on him, a few days since. A widow woman who had been boarding at a hotel, sent for him to prescribe for her child. He did so, and it recovered. He thought nothing more of the affair. But a few weeks afterward the woman presented herself at his house, saying she had very little money, and was desirious of discharging the debt by sewing for his family. He saw nothing wrong about the woman, and accepted the offer. In about a week, one bright morning, while in the parlor, the aforesaid woman, without warning anybody, added one to the population of the City! N. B. – My friend is a swearing man. My modesty forbids me saying anything further about the woman.

We are having plenty of fruit and melons here, but they command very exhorbitant prices. The peaches and pears are very fine.

Uncle Sam is fast selling off his surplus property in and about Louisville. If he could persuade the do-nothing officers to resign a little faster, he would be better off. But some people go on the principle of – “If you get a good thing save it.” I haven’t heard of any Quartermaster’s letting go their holds on the public teat in these parts.

Gen. Logan is now without a command. He reported to Gen. Palmer, commanding Department of Kentucky, the other day, and said the Army of the Tennessee was no more.

Yours,                                                                          T.

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To Correspondents.

            W. W. S., Big Neck, Ill. – On making out a new subscription book your name was accidentally omitted. It is now all right.

A. E. T., Dixon, Ill. – Your letter was received. The name of S. T. M. was found to be all right. Accept our thanks for your kindness.

W. H. T., Big Neck, Ill. – Thank you for the remembrance of the old score. We have quite a long list who seemed to have forgotten us in that respect. We comply with your request and refer you to our published terms.

H. R. H., Mendon, Ill. – The lines on the death of the President are too faulty for publication. The sentiment is very good but the expression is not.

U. B., Mendon, Ill. – This correspondent writes us respecting his dog which was discovered on Sunday morning last to be suffering from hydrophobia, and was thereupon killed. He neglects to sign his name in full as required by our rules.

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            → We give place this week to a letter from Serg’t Thos. M. Scott in reply to the letter from Col. Vernon, published a few weeks since. We are sorry to see the bitterness of feeling which has been developed in this controversy, but we could not in justice deny the use of our columns to Mr. Scott.

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            → Dr. D. M. Creel, of Industry, sends us word that he forwarded to us by mail two dollars as subscription money for the Journal. We have never received it. We should be sorry to believe that any one has been tampering with the mail between here and Industry, and we hope to hear that the missing letter has been found.

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            → We notice the name of Sergt John Gibbs, formerly of Co. H, 78th regiment, announced in the Carthage Gazette, as a candidate for county treasurer of Hancock county. John was severely wounded at the battle of Jonesboro, Ga., and was discharged in consequence of his wounds. He is worthy of the position.

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            For County Judge. – The name of W. S. Hendricks, formerly of the 78th regiment, is being mentioned by his numerous friends as a suitable candidate for County Judge. We could heartily endorse the nomination of Squire Hendricks, as he is a worthy and competent man.

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            → We have been informed that a travelling agent for the Eagle has represented that the history of the 84th regiment now being published in the Eagle was first offered to this paper and was refused. We wish to say that there is no truth in this representation.

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The New School House.

            This building is progressing favorably. The walls are now carried up as far as the first story, and we can now form some idea of the beauty and the proportions designed for this structure. It will really be an ornament to the city and an institution which all appreciate the benefit of. There is, of course, some carping opposition to the building. With some it is not located in the right place; with others it will cost too much. We understand that some reports are circulating that the building will cost as high as fifty thousand dollars. We are assured by Mr. W. O. Thomas that he has made a careful estimate of the probable expense of its construction and that it will not exceed twenty thousand dollars. Some of the bonds issued by the city for the construction of this building still remain unsold. Our citizens should interest themselves in this matter and see that the bonds are disposed of at their full value, and that speedily. The work on the building should not cease for lack of means. If it is pushed forward properly it will be ready for occupation during the coming winter.

Since the above was put in type we have been furnished by the building committee with an estimate in detail of the cost of the brick, lumber, &c., which will be required to finish the building. These estimates are based mainly upon present contracts, and the figures foot up $18,034, as the total cost of the building.

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A Slander Refuted.

            Under the above caption the Eagle of last week publishes a terrible effusion from one J. M. Finch, of Dallas City, Hancock county, which is copied from the Oquawka Spectator. We published a few weeks since a statement that the said Finch was called upon by some soldiers, and made to take the oath of fidelity to the Union. We received our information from a neighbor of Finch, and since our publication the same particulars appeared in the Carthage Gazette from a Dallas City correspondent. Finch denies the whole statement, and then eases himself of the following:

It will be a sufficient refutation of the allegations contained in the above, with the great mass of the citizens of Henderson and Hancock , when I state the simple fact that the author is one James K. Magie, who, I believe, figured in a newspaper at Oquawka, some six years ago; – the same Magie whom the Wide Awake Club at Terre Haut, in 1860, refused to let speak before them in consequence of his meanness; – the same Magie who soon after he started a paper in Carthage and played out in six months, and in that time outlived all his friends, – the same Magie who assumed the control and management of the Republican cause in Hancock county, who made speeches and statements so manifestly false that they were so proved upon him or every occasion, and after the election the Republicans attributed their defeat principally to his course, and were so indignant that they would not furnish him sufficient wood for his dying issue; – the same Magie who afterwards by some hook or crook got control of the a Republican sheet at Macomb, and when the war broke out in 1861, tried to raise a company with himself as captain, but failed. The company was raised, however, by others, and when it came to elect officers, Magie got nothing; having volunteered, he had to go to war, but he went as a private, and a very low one at that; and although he made constant efforts to get some kind of an office, to the credit of his company he never succeeded in rising above his grade.

There is not one line of truth in the above chapter of denunciation. We will dissect it a little.

Finch says:

“The same Magie whom the Wide Awake Club at Terre Haut, in 1860, refused to let speak before them.”

The Wide Awake Club at Terre Haute in 1860 passed a resolution unanimously inviting us to address them.

Finch says:

“The same Magie who soon after he started a paper in Carthage and played out in six months, and in that time outlived all his friends,”

We published a paper in Carthage eight months, and at the end of that time our party friends hed a meeting and unanimously selected us as their candidate for postmaster, which position we respectfully declined.

Finch says –

“The same Magie who assumed the control and management of the Republican cause in Hancock county, who made speeches and statements so manifestly false that they were so proved upon him or every occasion, and after the election the Republicans attributed their defeat principally to his course.”

Our statements were proved false on no occasion, and we will give Finch ten dollars for every Republican he will name who ever attributed their defeat to our course. A that election the Republicans were beaten in the county by between three and four hundred votes. At the next election when no “Magie” was there the Republicans were beaten by nearly twelve hundred votes.

Finch says –

“The same Magie who tried to raise a company with himself as Captain.”

We never tried to raise a company. We were solicited to raise a certain number of men for a company and we did it.

Finch says –

“Magie got nothing; having volunteered, he had to go to war, but went as a private, * * and although he made constant efforts to get some kind of an office to the credit of his company he never succeeded in rising about his grade.”

During our three years service we never asked a man for an office of any kind, but the office of first sergeant of our company was conferred upon us unsolicited and unexpected.

If Finch should make another effort to make something tell against us he might possibly hit upon one line of truth, as we do not pretend that there may not have been some short-comings in our rather exciting and eventful career. But when a man makes such a tremendous effort to traduce our character and can only hatch up a batch of such weak and manifest lies as Finch has, we begin to feel proud, and think we are better than our neighbors, for we know of but few but what might be touched up on some sore spot. Finch is about the last individual that we should suppose would rush in print to slander his betters, for he is notorious in his neighborhood as a liar, a rascal, a rake, and a traitor, who initiated some twenty or thirty of his copperhead brethren in an organization known as the “Sons of Liberty.” We have the documents to prove all that we say.

We beg pardon of our readers for devoting so much space to the barking curs at our heels. They need a kick now and then, and we feel strong enough to give it to them.

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            → The Eagle says we are publishing what we call a “History of the 78th regiment.” Why can’t that concern speak the truth. We never called it a history of the 78th. It bears a title that suits us very well.

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Reply to Col. Vernon.

Dallas City, Illinois,
August 5th, 1865.

Editor of Journal:

Sir – I received a few days ago a copy of your paper in which I saw a communication from Colonel Vernon, in which he presents me to be the “craven spirit” who wrote the statement published from the paroled prisoners of the 78th a few weeks ago. As I am not in the habit of denying anything I do, I will acknowledge that at the request of several of the paroled prisoners, I wrote the statement referred to. I did not believe in Vernon’s idea, that “soldiers have no right to think for themselves, that their officers are paid to think for them,” and so in that statement, I expressed their thoughts, only they thought there was not half enough of it.

Colonel Vernon denies refusing to send our descriptive rolls, and says that the whereabouts of the men were not known. This cannot be true. All our numbers were in almost daily correspondence with the regiment at that time, and in my case I give Lieutenant Woodruff as my authority that Colonel Vernon did refuse to have my descriptive roll sent me. I also append the certificates of two sergeants in my company H, which clinches the matter.

“We certify we heard M. R. Vernon, tell Lieutenant Woodruff, not to send T. M. Scott his descriptive roll.”
C. C. RICHART,
A. H. ROSE.

We, late members of Company H, 78th Illinois Infantry, certify that the statement of M. R. Vernon, in regard to T. M. Scott, keeping a continued discord between the company and company Commander, is a base lie.
C. C. RICHART, Ser’g Co. H,
JOHN H. MILLS,
D. J. HIGGINS.

While the regiment lay at Chicago, there were about thirty of us, paroled prisoners at Springfield. Other regiments at Chicago sent an officer down to see about mustering out the men, but we never heard a word from our regiment, and the result was we were mustered out without a settlement with the Government, putting us to a great deal of trouble and long delay in getting our pay, when a little attention on the part of Colonel Vernon, would have saved all trouble.

I expected Colonel Vernon to reply to my communication, but did not expect him to assail my character.

He says, “some how or other I got into the hands of the enemy.” He pretends not to know how I got into the hand of the enemy. He knows I was out under order from him, and doing exactly what I was ordered to do. He further says that my company was well rid of me when I was captured. Col. Vernon is at liberty to think as he pleases on that point, but my company, notwithstanding Vernon’s opinion that “soldiers had no right to think for themselves,” did think otherwise, for they all with but one exception, signed a petition for me to be commissioned captain of the company. I will here state that I was never absent a day from my company until I was captured. I was in every skirmish or fight they were in. During all that time I never rode in an ambulance but once and that was when I was wounded. He states that for the last six months I was in the regiment I kept up a continual discord between the company and company commander, and so great was this that his attention was on several occasions called to it by other officers. I don’t think he can give the name of an officer who will say he knows that I caused any discord between the company and company commander. The company commander and I had a little trouble but the company thought I was right and said so.

He further states that my malignity was aroused against him because he did not procure for me a commission in another company. That is a bare-faced lie. He offered it to me half a dozen times before I accepted it. I refused it on the ground that I did not wish to leave my company, and that probably the captain or company did not wish me to hold an office in the company. – He sent for the captain and enquired of him and he appeared to be willing. The truth is, I hold a commission as captain of my company over our first lieutenant, a particular friend of his. The idea was to get me to throw up my commission that his friend might get it. I also state, and dare him to deny it, that I several times offered to throw up my commission as captain if he would give the company choice between our two lieutenants but he [obscured] I suppose that [obscured] think for themselves. [Obscured]so anxious for an office as he pretends I would have accepted the office of adjutant or sergeant-major, which he offered to me several times. I wonder if he will deny that.

I might ask him to explain by what modus operandi he obtained his commission as Lieut-colonel. I might also ask him what became of the nice hams, flour, &c., that was foraged in Georgia. I might ask many questions which I think would embarrass the valiant colonel to answer, but I forbear.

Respectfully,
THOS. M. SCOTT.

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The Sneaks Returning.

            We notice by our exchanges that in many localities large numbers of the skedaddlers who sought to escape from their duty to the Government by a refuge in Canada, are returning to their homes, believing, now that the war is over, they are relieved from all responsibility for their crimes. In this they are sadly mistaken. The law of Congress explicitly declares that all such deserters, who failed to return to their companies, or report to a Provost Marshal within sixty days after the issue of the proclamation dated March 3d, 1865, should forfeit their rights and franchises as citizens. This law is now in full force and operation. All deserters who have failed to report before the 1st of May, 1865, have consequently forfeited their citizenship. It is well enough for the people in the localities where these skedaddlers now seek to resume their citizenship, to remember these legal facts, and see that they are properly enforced.

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Religious Notices.

            The pastor of the M. E. Church will preach next Sabbath morning on the subject of “Prayer as connected with Divine Providence.”

The Rev. D. Harris, of the U. P. Church, will preach in the Congregational Church next Sabbath afternoon at 5 o’clock.

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The Teachers’ Institute.

This association met at Bardolph on Wednesday. We heard that the attendance was fully as large as usual, and the exercises unusually interesting. We have been promised a report of proceedings for next week’s issue.

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            → Our old soldier friend Benj. Gill, is erecting a neat residence for himself on Washington street, near the corner of south Lafayette street. He has established himself in his old business of blacksmithing at his old stand, and is driving business after his usual energetic style.

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Change of Firm.

We learn that Frank R. Kyle, formerly proprietor of the City Drug Store, has purchased of McMillan & Co. their entire Drug Store on the south side. Frank is a good druggist.

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Taken Away.

The old blacksmith shop which has often of late been used as a stable at the north-east corner of the square has been taken down and removed, to the great relief of the citizens in that quarter. – We suppose a new building will go up on the site, but of that we are not advised.

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Chemical Soap.

Mr. G. A. Fuller, the patentee of a new and valuable soap, is in this city at Brown’s Hotel for the purpose of selling the right to manufacture and use his soap. Those wishing to examine and test the superior qualities of this soap can do so by calling on Mr. Fuller. We have seen certificates from those who have used the soap and they testify that it will remove tar, grease, ink and other obnoxious substances from clothing or even silks, without injury to the same, and that it saves one half of the labor of washing-day, to say nothing of the saving in the wear and tear of clothes.

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Furniture.

The furniture warerooms of B. F. Martin & Son in this city contain all varieties of good elegant and substantial furniture, which they are now selling at rates which defy competition. We would advise the people to give them a call, before purchasing elsewhere, and they will find that we speak but the truth. Remember the place, north side, Public Square, two doors west of Johnson’s.

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            → Mr. A. V. Brooking requests us to inform those who wish to hire horses or buggies, or both, to give him a call at the Randolph stables, and he will fit them out to their satisfaction. He also runs the “bus” to the depot, and will carry passengers to any part of the city. Orders for the ‘bus may be left at either hotel.

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The 84th.

The Eagle is publishing a history of the organization, marches &c., of the 84th regiment from the pen of Lieut. L. A. Simmons. It is written in good style and will no doubt make an interesting feature in that paper.

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            → Messrs. Hagerty & McIntosh, at the old and well-known livery stable on the south side of the square, have on hand at all times, good horses and nice carriages and buggies which they hire at reasonable rates. Their horses are fast, gentle and kind.

August 12, 1865

Macomb Eagle

HISTORY OF THE 84TH REGI-
MENT ILL. VOLS.

BY L. A. SIMMONS.

INTRODUCTION.

            In commencing to lay before the reading public in a newspaper, a full and accurate History of the 84th Regt Ill Vol, Inft, we wish at the very outset to have it understood that the task is undertaken at the urgent request of many who were members of this regiment, and their friends; who seem inclined to believe, that because we were so fortunate as to keep a journal or diary of passing events, during the whole term of enlistment we have all the necessary facts at hand for such a History. Many have urged the publication of our diary, but this we have ever considered, for various reasons utterly impracticable. Having consented to write for the gratification of our former comrades and their friends, we wish all to distinctly understand, that we shall only attempt to bring before them a plain unvarnished statement of facts; a distinct, concise, and reliable narration of events as they transpired, during the term of almost three years, that we were in the service.

It would be a display of arrogance and vanity, to claim for our regiment, superiority over others in material drill, discipline or courage; or to show that it, more frequently than most others bore the shock and brunt of battle; that it endured greater hardships, or suffered more severely in action than other regiments who have contributed to make a proud and glorious record, for our noble State. Such claims we have no intention of setting forth, – invidious comparisons we shall most carefully avoid; and shall endeavor to abstain even from the luxury of indulging in terms of eulogy upon the conduct and career of our regiment. We are proud, and we think justly, of the record which our regiment made, and to our latest hour expect to esteem it an honor, that our name was for the whole term upon its rolls. We are content to lay before the public the plain truth; facts stated with the utmost seriousness and candor; being fully satisfied that the thinking patriotic citizens who read this history, will award to the Regiment no improper position, on the glorious Roll of Honor of the State of Illinois.

CHAPTER I.

The Organization.

            The Spring and Summer of 1862 were fraught with stirring events. The war had been in progress a year; vast armies had been sent into the field, but as yet only a small portion of the Confederate States had been passed over by our forces. The army of the Mississippi had hardly advanced to the northern boundary of the Mississippi and Alabama; the army of the Potomac was toiling upon the Peninsula, and at every point our troops were met by equal and at many points by superior numbers. It was evident to all thinking minds, that more troops must be speedily sent to the scenes of action, or the suppression of the great rebellion would indeed prove a failure. The President seemed fully to comprehend the situation, and about the 1st of June, 1862, issued his proclamation calling for fifty thousand more volunteers to serve for the term of three years, or during the war. The quota for Illinois under this call was speedily determined and it was soon known that four new regiments were immediately required. On the 6th day of June, Governor Yates telegraphed to Louis H. Waters Esq, of Macomb, Ill, offering him the Colonelcy of one of these regiments. Col. W. had early in the war gone into the field, and as Lt. Col. commanded the 28th Regt. Ill. Vols. for several months; but for substantial reasons had resigned his position in that regiment and returned to the practice of his profession. On receiving this telegram, he immediately replied to Gov. Yates that he would gladly accept the proposed honor, if he should find it possible to enlist a regiment. Within the succeeding ten days he wrote to many influential friends in adjoining counties soliciting their co-operation, and made a strong effort, in his own town and county, to secure the efforts, in this direction, of men competent to become officers; besides this, he was actively engaged in soliciting every man to enlist, who could possibly leave his family and business. During the month of June, at least twenty men declared their intention of raising a company for his regiment and though they labored diligently the work of recruiting progressed but slowly. Partisan feeling was still rife in every community, and in many truly patriotic breasts there still rankled deep-rooted prejudices against the President, and dominant party; but Col. Waters was not the man to despair of ultimate success. From the middle of June, until the 1st of August he was incessantly on the move; addressing public meetings in Mercer, Henderson, Hancock, McDonough, Fulton, Schuyler, Brown and Adams counties, and every where rendering all the assistance he possibly could to those who were recruiting. To Capt. William Ervin of Macomb, Ill, belongs the credit of having organized the first company for the 84th Regt. Ill. Vols. He started to Camp Butler, the camp of rendezvous, with about fifty men on the 1st day of July, 1862, but immediately returned to McDonough Co. for recruits to fill up his company. About the 25th of July the camp of rendezvous for this regiment was changed to Quincy Ills., for during this month the army of the Potomac had met with terrible reverses; the army in Southern Tennessee was being forced back into Kentucky; the President in this emergency had called for three hundred thousand volunteers; and the quota of Illinois, now being about forty regiments instead of four, it became necessary to establish camps of rendezvous in the several congressional districts of the State. Now it was, that the peril of our government became apparent to every one; farmers left their crops standing in the field, mechanics threw aside their tools, merchants hastened to turn the measuring of calicoes and ribbons into other hands, and all rushed into camp, earnest, anxious, zealous, to do their part in sustaining the best government the world ever saw in upholding the Constitution and the laws. During the month of July and the early part of August, ten companies were filled up and organized for the 84th Regt. Ills Vols, and before 15th of August, all were in camp near Quincy Ills. Our abstract of the records of the regiment shows the original organization to have been as follows: Company C was organized at Macomb about July 1; William Ervin, Capt., Epaphroditus C. Coulson 1st Lieut., William P. Pearson, 2d Lieut. Company A organized July 21st, at Macomb, Ills., John P. Higgins, Capt., Thomas G. Wisdom, 1st Lieut., William F. Starnes, 2d Lieut. Company G organized July 25th at Oquawka, Ill., Fred. Garternicht, Capt., William H. Fuller 1st Lieut., Russell W. Caswell 2d lieut. Company D organized at Mt. Sterling Ills, about July 27th. M. W. Davis, Capt., Thomas D. Adams, 1st Lieutenant, Walter Scoggan, 2d Lieut. Company I organized at Clayton, Ills, Aug. 6th, Albert J. Griffith Capt. William Scott, 1st Lieut. Thomas F. Kendrick 2d Lieut. Co K organized at Biggsville, Ills, Aug 8th, John B. McGaw, Capt., Alexander P. Nelson 1st Lieut., Myron H. Mills, 2d Lieut. Co. B organized at Vermont, about Aug. 10th, V. M. Grewell, Capt., Lemuel L. Scott, 1st Lieut. James A. Russell 2d Lieut., Co F, organized at Vermont Ills, Aug. 11th, Caleb B. Cox, Capt., Joseph Nelson, 1st Lieut., Samuel Frost, 2d Lieut. Co H, organized at Keithsburg, Ills., Aug. 14th, John C. Pepper, Capt, Luther T, Bell, 1st Lieut, Henry F. Abercrombie 2d Lieut. Co E organized at Quincy, Ill, Aug. 15th, Myron G. Tousley, Capt., Hiram P. Roberts, 1st Lieut., Henry V. Lewis, 2d Lieut. The organization of the regiment was completed about the 15th of August. Thomas Hamer having been appointed Lt. Col., Charles H. Morton, Maj., James B. Kyle, Surgeon, David McDill and Elijah C. Marshall Assistant Surgeons Charles E. Waters, Adjutant, Samuel L. Roe, Quartermaster and Rev. Ralph Harris, Chaplain. The following men were selected for the noncommissioned staff, – John W. Frierson of Co F, for Sergeant Major, Andrew S. McDowell of Co. I, Quartermaster Sergeant, Monroe P. Edwards, Commissary Sergeant, and Thomas B. Maury, Hospital Steward. The position of the several companies in the regiment was determined by drawing lots for letters – when Capt. Higgins drew A which placed his company on the right, Capt. Grewell B, which placed his company on the left, Capt. Ervin C. which made his the right center or Color company of the regiment. For the benefit of those who have not been in the service, we will here state, that the companies of a regiment are arranged by letter, and commencing on the right, stand in the following order, A, F, D, I, C, H, E, K, G, B. As soon as the several companies went into camp, Col Waters had them well supplied with clothing and camp equipage, and made drill the order of the day from 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. Saturdays excepted.

After the organization of the Regiment was completed, the drill was vigorously continued and too much credit can scarcely be given Col. Waters for his indefatigable efforts at this time, to render his Regiment fit for immediate duty in the field. His recent experience in the 28th Il., Vols, rendered him thoroughly competent as a drill-master and tactician. In Capt. Garternicht he found an able and thorough assistant, for Capt. G, had not only drilled with Col. Waters in the 28th Ill. Vols., but had seen several years actual service in the German army. The month of August was devoted to drill and the study of the Regulations and Tactics.

The sudden change from citizen to camp life, could not of course be made without inducing considerable disease, and as most were for the first time compelled to cook for themselves most of the food during the first month was badly prepared. To become a thorough soldier, a man has many things to learn, and during this month we must contend that the Regiment as a whole, made good progress. Before the end of the month we were said to be ready for muster into the U. S. service, and awaited somewhat anxiously the arrival of the mustering officer, to make us a part of the grand army of the Union. The rolls were prepared about the 20th and on the last day of the month Capt. Ewing arrived. But of muster and the incidents of the ensuing three months in another Chapter.

CHAPTER II,

Muster – In to Service and Kentucky Campaign.

            All the necessary preparations having been made, on the 1st day of September, 1862, Capt. Ewing of the U. S. Army mustered in the regiment for the term of three years or during the war. In his inspection of men as he proceeded to muster, he rejected some from each company as unfit for service. These we noticed were generally boys from seventeen to twenty years old, most, if not all, of whom would have made excellent soldiers, and who would, as a general thing, have endured the hardships incident to a soldiers life better than men of more mature age. The fact has been remarked by many that boys of this age proved more capable of enduring the toils, privations and fatigue of actual service than those of any other age. Those who were rejected by the mustering officer regretted very much that they could not be received, but many of them subsequently were taken by other regiments, and we met them from time to time in Dixie. – The original muster-in-rolls show that company A had three enlisted officers and eighty-two enlisted men; company B three officers and eighty-nine enlisted men; company C three officers and ninety-two enlisted men; company D three officers and ninety-three enlisted men; company E three officers and ninety-four enlisted men; company F three officers and eighty-eight enlisted men; company G three officers and eighty-seven enlisted men; company H three officers and ninety-five enlisted men; company I three officers and ninety-four enlisted men; company K three officers and eighty-nine enlisted men; field and staff, nine officers and four enlisted men; making the aggregate strength of the regiment nine hundred and forty-six, officers and men.

Two days after muster the regiment was ordered to be in readiness for a move at any moment – and this order continued in force for the succeeding twenty days. The drill was continued every day, and every effort put forth to render the regiment thoroughly acquainted with all the evolutions required in actual service. On the 4th day of September a large pic nic party came from Macomb, Vermont, and intermediate neighborhoods, to our camp, and enjoyed a brief visit and a good dinner with the boys before they went into the field. They brought an abundance of delicacies for the palate, but their presents was enjoyed far more than all. The day passed very happily, but toward evening, when the hour for separation and parting came, pearly tears were welling from more eyes than belonged to fond mothers, wives, daughters, and sweethearts. – On the 14th the Regiment was armed with the long Enfield rifle musket, and fully equipped for duty in the field. About the 19th of September twenty-five dollars of bounty was paid to each enlisted man; a months advance pay had been received a few days previous. For several days it was currently reported that we were about to go into Missouri, but on the 23d the Regiment took the cars for Louisville, where it arrived on the 26th, and after a few hours delay went into camp in the southeastern portion of the city. – When we arrived in Louisville we were surprised to see a broad pontoon bridge nearly completed across the Ohio, and that a large number of the business houses were closed. It was indeed a season of agitation and alarm among the citizens. Gen. Bragg had encamped only about five or six miles from the city, and an attack was hourly expected. We had scarcely laid off camp when the regiment was ordered to move. Lines of battle were hastily formed in the street, and an attack was, during the whole night, momentarily expected. Yes, our first night on the south side of the Ohio river was passed in line of battle, resting on arms, reposing upon a newly paved street – rather a rough bed the boys counted it, but it was only a fair beginning of the hardships they were to find in the “sunny south.” In the course of three or four days the regiment was supplied with the necessary transportation, and on the evening of the 28th was sent out on picket, where it remained until the army moved. – On the evening of the 30th of September, the order was circulated allowing but one wagon to each regiment for the transportation of baggage, one tent for the headquarters of each regiment, and all other teams were detailed for duty in ammunition and supply trains. Our Regiment, meantime, was assigned to the tenth (10th) Brigade of the fourth (4th) Division, in which it continued during the campaign.

(TO BE CONTINUED.)

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A Slander Refuted.

To the Editor of the Oquaka Spectator.

Gentlemen: – A friend has called my attention o the following article which appeared in the columns of the Macomb Journal of July 14, 1865:

A Copperhead Coerced. – We learn that some returned soldiers residing about Dallas City, in the neighboring county of Hancock, recently called up on a notorious Copperhead living in Dallas named Finch, and began to question him concerning the manner in which he had upheld the war for the Union during their absence. Finch trembled in his boots and turned pale, and made diverse protestations of sound Union principles. The boys knew he lied, for this Finch was a prominent member of that treasonable organization, the Sons of Liberty, and his name was unearthed and published in connection with the Chicago conspirators. The boys thought if he was a good Union man he could have no objection to hurrahing for the Union, and swearing never to vote hereafter anything but a first-class Union ticket. Finch hurrahed for the Union in fine style, and swore solemnly that he would never vote another copperhead ticket.

As I am the only man named Finch residing here, I presume I am the individual alluded to as a Copperhead living in Dallas named Finch.

It will be a sufficient refutation of the allegations contained in the above, with the great mass of the citizens of Henderson and Hancock, when I state the simple fact that the author is one James K. Magie, who, I believe, figured in a newspaper at Oquawka, some six years ago; – the same Magie whom the Wide Awake Club at Terre Haut, in 1860, refused to let speak before them in consequence of his meanness; – the same Magie who soon after he started a paper in Carthage and played out in six months, and in that time outlived all his friends, – the same Magie who assumed the control and management of the Republican cause in Hancock county, who made speeches and statements so manifestly false that they were so proved upon him or every occasion, and after the election the Republicans attributed their defeat principally to his course, and were so indignant that they would not furnish him sufficient wood for his dying issue; – the same Magie who afterwards by some hook or crook got control of the a Republican sheet at Macomb, and when the war broke out in 1861, tried to raise a company with himself as captain, but failed. The company was raised, however, by others, and when it came to elect officers, Magie got nothing; having volunteered, he had to go to war, but he went as a private, and a very low one at that; and although he made constant efforts to get some kind of an office, to the credit of his company he never succeeded in rising above his grade.

Unerring nature has stamped the villain on Magie’s countenance, so that every honest man, upon looking him in the face, may prepare a lash

“To whip the Rascal naked through the world.”

Of course there is not the shadow or semblance of truth in the allegations, and they could only originate with such an unprincipled liar as this Magie.

As to my course forwards the soldiers and their families, let the soldiers speak for themselves.

Yours truly.                                                     John M. Finch.

Dallas City, July 25, 1865.

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            → The Journal published an account of an outrage on a negro girl by some poor specimen of humanity and wants to know why we don’t howl about it. We did not hear of it, and if we had we are not in the habit of “playing dog.” The Journal insinuates that the person that did it was a democrat. As the person is not known we presume he started the report to keep suspicion off himself. We have just as much ground for believing that he was the man as he has that it was a democrat.

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            WANTED. – A first class salesman wanted immediately at Johnson’s.

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History of the 84th Regiment.

            We commence this week the publication of the History of the 84th Regiment, and trust it will prove interesting. We have a few extra copies of the Eagle containing the first chapter.

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Georgia Muslins.

            We have often heard about the cotton factories in the South, and there has been much speculation as to whether their fabrics will compare with the products of northern mills. Our readers can now have an opportunity to judge of this matter for themselves, by calling at Nelson Abbott’s dry goods house, where a lot of sheetings manufactured at the Augusta factory, Georgia, can be examined. – And while there you might as well purchase some of those cheap and desirable prints, new style delaines, etc., etc., the like of which can be found nowhere else in town. Remember Abbott’s new cash dry goods house, southwest corner of the square.

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            → The lovers of amusement in this vicinity will have an opportunity offered them of witnessing the best performance of the season. The Great Union Combination Show performs in our city Tuesday, August 22nd. This troupe is spoken highly of by the press, generally, and we anticipate a rich treat.

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            → One Friday last conductor Abbe, on the down freight, at Colchester, while uncoupling the cars got his hand caught between two bumpers, taking off two fingers.

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            →Talk as you please about the rain injuring the wheat crop, there can be no doubt about Watkins & Co. selling more groceries than any other house in town. They sell more because they sell cheaper.

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            Home Again. – Our fellow townsman, H. R. Bartleson, returned from the Idaho gold mines last Friday. We have had no time to talk with him about matters in the mountains, but we know that operations in his lumber yard are lively for the season. Go there when you want to buy “plank” at lowest figures.

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            → J. H. Wilson’s jewelry store is the place to get your broken trinkets mended, or time keepers regulated. A fine assortment of good jewelry always for sale.

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            → A good boot is a desirable thing, and the place to get them made right and of the best material is at C. M. Ray’s manufactory. All work warranted.

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            Good in Sickness. – A. J. Browl has a fine lot of Catawba and California Wine, which he will sell for medicinal purposes. These Wines are pure and good. If you ain’t sick get sick and try them. We have no doubt it would gladden the heart of any temperance man.

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            The Equescurriculum. – The wonderful combination of intrinsic merit, and rare attractiveness, the Equescurriculum, is advertised to pay Macomb its second annual tour, on Saturday the 19th ult. This establishment [?] it was here last season gave universal satisfaction, and convinced the people, that the integrity of showmen is sometimes as good as any other person of character, engaged in active, business pursuits.

Mr. Lent the manager and the proprietor of the institution has materially strengthened his forces this season, and now has the largest show that has ever traveled. One hundred men, and one hundred and twenty horses, being daily brought into requisition there are some forty artistes all of them first class, who appears in the combined performances.

The great equestrian, the only bare back rider in the world, the high light of the Circle, James Robinson, styled the champion horseman, has been engaged, and will rider twice at each entertainment, introducing in a daring scene of horsemanship his infant son. Master D[?], Madame Tourniaire and her wonderful troup of French dancing horses are among the recent acquisitions of the Monster Equescurriculum.

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            Progressing. – The work on the new High School building is progressing, as fast as can be expected. The building committee have purchased some splendid brick for the out side wall, and this will add greatly to the appearance of the building. The Messrs Johnsons are doing a fine job of work on this building, and when it has finished we venture it will compare favorably with any building of the kind in the State.

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            PITTS!! PITTS!! PITTS!! – Farmers in want of a Threshing Machine will find it to their interest to look at the Pitts machine at Wadham & Stowells, N. W. corner square. They are also receiving a large lot of the Princeton Sorgo Mill that gave such universal satisfaction last Fall. Give them a call before you buy.

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            Thanks. – We tender to Lieut. S. L. Roe of Clayton, and others, our thanks for the interest they have taken in regard to the history of the 84th Regiment.

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            → The appointment of Magie to the post office in Macomb reminds us of the boy who wrote to his father: “Come out here, dad, right away – the meanest men in town can office under this administration.”

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            → Bob Acres has become historical, in consequence of his courage oozing out at his fingers’ ends. Magie, if we are to believe the reports, will become notorious in consequence of his courage “running off at his bowels.” We hope he won’t “run” the post office in the same way.

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            → Magie is writing what he calls a “history of the 78th regiment.” So far it is a narrative of his great expectations, his disappointment, his loves, his hates and his revenges. He fancies himself the biggest toad in the puddle. Because others estimate him at his true worth, instead of acknowledging his own opinion of his value, he now doles out his lamentations by the chapter, and blurs a good deal of white paper, with his lachrymal effusions. He can go on with impunity, for we do not believe that any one whom he attempts to bespatter will pay him the least notice until skunk skins bear a better price than they do now.

August 11, 1865

Macomb Journal

LIFE IN THE ARMY.

Being the Observations and Experiences
of a Private Soldier.

By J. K. MAGIE.

CHAPTER IV.

(Continued.)

            My last chapter closed with the arrival of our regiment at Jeffersonville. When daylight appeared the men began to look about for means to prepare breakfast. Our mess pans, kettles, &c., were designed for large messes of twenty or more, and these were stored away in the cars and difficult to get at. The men that morning were cross and impatient – the different messes could not find their own proper utensils, some persisted in sleeping, while their comrades were punching them up to go for wood or water. After much toil and perseverance, and the upsetting of numerous coffee-pots, the men made out a sort of muddy breakfast. I have often thought of the troubles, perplexities and difficulties attending the preparation of breakfast that morning in contrast with the later experience of the soldiers in reference to their culinary affairs. It soon became apparent that each man must depend upon himself if he wanted his proper share of rations and wanted it cooked properly. On our tramps through Tennessee, Georgia, &c., each man was generally independent of his neighbor. He carried his own rations, coffee pot, frying pan, &c., and cooked for himself. It was common, however for two, and sometimes three or four to form one mess and take their turns in toteing the frying pan or coffee pot. In Sherman’s army there was more coffee boiled in small quart cans, which had been used for preserving fruits, than in all other vessels combined. But some of the men made very poor cooks. I was never disposed to boast of own proficiency in preparing a meal, and if I should set up any such claims my old comrades I know would dispute them, for to tell the truth I could eat a meal much better than I could cook it.

In the course of the day a camping ground was selected in the eastern suburbs of the city, on land owned by that eminent sympathizer with treason, Jesse D. Bright. It was night before our tents were erected, and I think we all enjoyed as good a sleep that night as we ever did at home, although our beds were made upon the cold damp ground.

The next morning we breakfasted on coffee and crackers – and such crackers – they were about as hard to bite as an old dry shingle, and about as tasteless. There was a screw loose somewhere, and no meat, sugar or rice to be obtained. Coffee and crackers were the only commodities. The Quartermaster was vigilant, but for several days we saw no other food but coffee and crackers.

In the course of the day we received our arms and were considerably disappointed to find that they were the same old guns which had been rejected at Quincy. But it was these guns or none. Bragg was then threatening Louisville, and the excitement ran high. All business was suspended both in Louisville and Jeffersonville, and men took to drilling and throwing up breastworks. It was expected every day that an awful conflict would ensue, for the Union leaders were determined that Louisville should not be given up without a desperate struggle. We now began to see something of the paraphernalia of war – troops were hourly arriving, and army wagons without number. The constant moving of wagons and the tramp of soldiers filled the roads, and indeed all the country around there, with a fine dust several inches in depth. The air was dry and excessively hot, and the dust so thick as to render an object invisible two or three rods distant. Towards night we received marching orders. It was ten o’clock before the regiment began to move, but movements at that time were not executed as rapidly as in after times. In the Georgia campaign I have seen the regiment on the march in ten minutes after receiving the order, having in that time struck tents, packed knapsacks, &c. We moved toward the river which we crossed that night about twelve o’clock. We marched in a southwesterly course through the city of Louisville. Occasionally the men would be halted for a rest, when the most of them would drop in their tracks, dust over shoe, and leaning back upon their knapsacks, would catch a little sleep. It was just before daylight that we were halted on some vacant lots in the extreme south-western part of the city. Here we were ordered to rest, and each man rolled himself in his blanket and made up his bed upon the ground. We laid there until about noon, when the regiment was called into line, ready for another march. We proceeded the distance of just one block when a halt was ordered with instructions to prepare dinner. Hard crackers and coffee for dinner. A board sidewalk was appropriated for fuel with which to cook our coffee. Our tents had not yet arrived, and no prospect of their arriving for at least a day or two, and as we then thought we could not do without a shelter, the board fences in the vicinity were tore down and the boards so placed against other fences as to form for us a very good shelter.

The next morning at 3 o’clock the regiment was called into line, each man with his knapsack, gun &c. Vague rumors were whispered from one company to another, and from man to man, that at daylight a terrible battle would commence. – There surely must be something in the wind or the regiment would not be called up at that unseasonable hour and required to stand still for hours in the same position, unless it was that the enemy was supposed to be creeping up stealthily and it was determined that he should be greeted with a warm reception. Soon after daylight the day passed off with a few hours drill and coffee and crackers.

The next morning the regiment was ordered into line at precisely three o’clock. – Now there was something up surely. – There the regiment stood for two long hours, men with their knapsacks on, and guns and accoutrements. Men listened eager to catch any sound in the distance that might give a solution to the wonderful vigilance that seemed to be exercised by the commanding general. The men were dismissed for breakfast, and then immediately ordered into line again. All that day, in a broiling hot sun, the men were obliged to be on their feet, with knapsacks and accoutrements on, and were not dismissed until ten o’clock at night, except the few minutes they were allowed for meals. By this time it was reported that Gen. Buell was on the outskirts of the city with his army, and that Gen. Bragg was retreating. These “knapsack parades,” as the men learned to call them, were understood to be ordered by on Captain Gilbert, who was exercising authority as a Major-General, and were justified on the ground that they were necessary to inure the men to hardship and fatigue. This system was persevered in by that same individual months afterward in Tennessee, and I have heard the officers of our regiment express it as their opinion that scores of men were killed outright by that cruel and inexcusable practice. At this time our regiment with the 80th and 86th Indiana, formed a Brigade. At the end of three days, under the “knapsack parade” system, there were over three hundred men in the Brigade on the sick list. – An old grist mill in the vicinity was generously tendered by the owner, and was used for a short time as a hospital.

It was about this time, the 29th of September, that the difficulty arose between Gen. Nelson and Gen. J. C. Davis in which the former was killed by the latter. According to the reports current at that time, and which have been since confirmed, it appears that Gen. Davis called upon Gen. Nelson at the Galt House to receive some information respecting arms and ammunition, for his Brigade. Nelson was his superior officer, and had command of the post at Louisville. He was notorious for his gruff and insulting manner to all who approached him. He asked Davis how many men he had. Davis replied, “About three thousand.” Nelson retorted, “About three thousand,” and repeated the expression in a most contemptuous manner, and then fell to abusing Davis and disparaging his military qualifications for not knowing the precise number. Davis felt himself insulted and remonstrated against such language, upon which Nelson slapped him in the face. Davis then sought a pistol and a friend, and in fifteen minutes afterward approached Nelson and told him to defend himself. He then fired, the ball taking effect in Nelson’s breast, from which he died in fifteen minutes afterwards. I never heard that Davis was ever arrested for his connection with this affair. I saw a newspaper paragraph a few months afterward that Davis had been indicted in that county for manslaughter. The general feeling in the army was that Nelson was served about right.

It was about the last of September that General Buel marched with his army into Louisville. They had made a rapid march of over two hundred miles. The weather at that time was hot, dry and dusty, and this brave and gallant army looked rather the worse for wear. The men were much incensed against Buell, as the opinion seemed to prevailed that Bragg could have been worsted at any time.

On the 28th of September, our regiment was marched to the eastern part of the city, and a camp laid out of on some vacant lots, near the Bardstown pike. The fear and alarm which had prevailed in consequence of the threatened attack now began to subside, and business in the city slowly resumed its usual activity. Company drill was resumed in all the regiments. Exciting rumors were still current respecting heavy battles between our pursuing army and the retreating rebels.

It was while located at this point that a serious accident occurred to a member of our regiment, which ultimately, resulted in his death. James Tipton, of Blandinville, while out shooting at a mark accidently caused a premature discharge of his gun. The ball passed through his wrist, causing such wound that amputation became necessary a few days thereafter. He was subsequently discharged, and started for home before his wound was sufficiently healed to travel. He was taken with fever on his way home, and died at the Randolph House in this city.

[TO BE CONTINUED.]

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            → Mr. A. J. Veal, who advertises a farm for sale in this paper, will please call or send for a letter at this office calling for information respecting said farm.

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            Thanks. – Tatham; at Louisville, will please accept our thanks for numerous favors received.

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The Fall Election.

            The election this Fall is for County Officers. A County Clerk, County Judge, Treasurer, School Commissioner and Surveyor are to be elected. The State Officers, with a Legislature, are not elected until next year.

It may be argued by some that no national questions are involved in a county election. In one sense this is true; but it cannot be denied that these local elections have a bearing and an influence upon our national concerns. The Copperhead party, although the advocates of no special policy, and striving for power. Let them attain sufficient supremacy in the councils of our nation to form a working majority by an alliance with rebels and rebel sympathizers, and the mischief they will work will be incalculable. Success in our county elections only gives them more power, and better chances for success in future elections where important national questions are involved.

We trust that the importance of our county election will not be overlooked. We should select good, competent and faithful men – men who have stood firmly by the Union from the first to the last. We are not among those who think that soldiers only should be selected to fill our offices, but we think they should be fairly represented upon the ticket. Heretofore we have been called an ungrateful people, but let it be said no more. Let us show a willingness to promptly recognize the claims of those who have made sacrifices in behalf of our common country.

We publish this week announcements from two candidates for public favor. Col. Samuel Wilson and Captain Wm. Ervin. Both these gentlemen are eminently qualified for the respective positions for which they are announced, and they have both manifested their devotion to the Union cause on their battle-field. But while these two gentlemen are in every way unobjectionable, there may be others equally entitled to consideration. We hope to see wise and judicious nominations made, so as to do justice to the soldier, to the people and all concerned, and we need have no fear of the result.

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            We do not claim to be the only friend soldiers have, but we do claim that we think as much of them as the man who would induce a soldier to take his paper, and after the soldier was killed, urge his comrades to make up the pitiful sum. – Eagle.

If the Eagle has reference to us in the above paragraph, we wish to say that during our entire service in the army, we never asked a single individual to subscribe for our paper, although it would have been perfectly legitimate for us to do so, and we never asked or even hinted to the comrades of deceased soldiers to make up to us the “pitiful sum.” If we ever did the Eagle has abundant opportunities to prove it. – Such fabrications evince a low, mean, and base disposition. We did, however, after the order was issued for our muster out, issue some printed circulars which brought several hundred subscribers. If the writer of the above extract was any “friend to the soldiers,” he would not be inventing base and mean fabrications to disparage the honorable record of one of the number.

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            → The copperhead print at Carthage dolefully exclaims – “The People no longer govern, but are governed.” When the people govern whom do they govern? Answer that is you please.

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The City Printing.

            It is an axiom that public opinion has come to approve that “To the victors belong the spoils.” The history of all political parties in this country for the last thirty years, is in accordance with this sentiment. With a change of party in the Administration there has been a change of the bestowal of patronage. The party in power all over the country usually show in the distribution of their patronage, in the matter of advertising and printing, a partiality for those newspapers advocating and supporting their own political faith. We don’t know of a single instance in the whole country where a Democratic Board, whether it be in State, county, or city, are in the habit of bestowing their patronage upon Republican newspapers to the exclusion of Democratic journals. But since our return from the army, the City Council of this city, which has a Republican Union majority, has been pleased to withdraw from us their patronage and to bestow it upon that pro-slavery and notoriously disloyal sheet, the Macomb Eagle. The justification of the Council is that the Eagle establishment does the printing cheaper. We have not the least doubt that that establishment would do the printing for nothing, and that its party would make up the amount, rather than to see us get it at any price. It is a stroke of policy with them, and adds something to their political capital. We have seen the figures at which they do the work, and there is not a printer or any other individual with any knowledge upon the subject, but who will say that they do the work at a positive loss. We submitted a proposition to do the printing at three-fourths our regular rates, which would merely cover the cost of hire and material, and the city ought to have been satisfied with the proposition. If they see fit to take the city printing to the Eagle office let them do so, but in the name of reason and justice and humanity let them pay at least a reasonable price for the work they require. They pay the mechanics employed upon the school house, and the laborers upon the streets, and others in their employ, a reasonable price for their labor, but some how or other they seem to think that a printer should work for nothing, and receive the kicks and curses of community in the bargain.

It is a very common practice in both parties, in cities, counties and States, to bestow lucrative patronage upon some party organ, in order to put it on a firm and substantial basis. We hold this to be wrong. The people should not be taxed in order merely to throw money into the coffers of some newspaper establishment. But we hold that all corporations should be willing to pay fair remunerative prices to all they find necessary to employ, whether they be mechanic, laborer or printer. The sentiment has become too common that a newspaper publisher can afford to do a great amount of work gratis. In the course of a year we are called upon by political parties or benevolent societies to do at least five hundred dollars worth of work for nothing. For instance, we this week publish the call for a County Convention. Nobody thinks to pay us a cent for this, and we do not expect to receive any pay for it, but such a call as this could not gain insertion in the Chicago Tribune or the New York Tribune, or any other of the party papers in the large cities, at one cent less than the regular advertising rates. There is not a notice of a political meeting or a religious meeting that goes into the columns of the large city papers, but what is paid for. But we do all such work gratis, and a great deal more that we might enumerate. But when we do such work as a favor to the party, we have a right to expect that the party will reciprocate the favor when it is in their power to do so.

In this connection we will say that we are the only publisher that this paper ever had who did not come on the party for contribution to sustain it. We have never asked nor never received one dime as a bonus or contribution to sustain this paper. During our connection with it, it has lived by its own legitimate patronage. We came to Macomb and took editorial charge of the paper at the urgent solicitation of a number of leading Republicans in the county. When we first came here, we found that the office had not credit for a loaf of bread or a pound of flour, and our family went hungry in consequence. The situation is vastly different now. If the city council thinks that we have grown rich enough to live without their patronage, all we can say is, that they are not far from right.

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            One thing seems to be settled, viz: that Johnson is to be President. The postmaster at Macomb, has been removed and one Jas. K. Magie appointed his successor. So far, so good for President Johnson.

The above paragraph is taken from the Macomb Eagle. That bird is inclined to be profuse in its quotations from our columns, and to be fair, we reciprocate.

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            The soldiers in the late war. * * * They are as despicable as they are degraded. Their hate is better than their friendship.

The above language we gather from the columns of the Macomb Eagle. It is arranged equal to anything that may be found in the clippings from “Magie’s lamentations.”

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            The Eagle says he has been told that “the music of rebel bullets wasn’t a bit soothing’.” Of course he was told. Who ever suspected otherwise of him.

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The Eagle Screams.

            The editor of this paper has been appointed Postmaster and the numerous editors of the Eagle wax very wroth threat. They shriek, and scream, and gnash their teeth, and foam at the mouth, and howl, and rave, and cavort, and take on terribly. At first they could not believe it – no, it couldn’t be so – the intelligence was too appalling – it was too grievious even to think of. But at last “it was soon settled beyond a doubt that it was so.” It is awful to contemplate what must have been their feelings when the terrible conviction was forced upon their minds that it was even so. That Magie should have an office, and above all things, the Post Office – oh, is there a remedy – who will help us in this dire affliction. They turn their imploring eyes even to us, and they tell us that if we will call a meeting of the friends of the Administration, and if we can get twelve men who would favor our appointment they would “cheerfully acquiesce” – yes they would cheerfully acquiesce. It appears then that the great burden which afflicts their soul is that the “friends of the Administration” may not be suited. If the friends of the Administration are suited, “we cheerfully acquiesce.” Was there ever such an instance manifested of Copperhead sympathy with the friends of the Administration. We don’t believe there ever was. The numerous editors beseech and implore still further. In the agony of their spirit they cry out – “yea, we will even go further.” How dreadful must be their feelings. Without waiting to hear a response from their first proposition they rush on to make a second proposition. This they think cannot fail to move us – it is so very liberal in its terms. In pathetic strains they tell us that if we will find six men who would favor our appointment, they “will surrender all objection.” What a high appreciation they do have of themselves, surely. If we will do so and so they “will surrender all objection.” They want to be “consillyated” it seems. We do wonder what will be the dreadful consequences if those Eagle folks should not be prevailed upon to “surrender all objection.” We shudder at the thought. But the Eagle is moved to still another proposition. They did a job of printing from the Post Office, amounting to two dollars, and if we will be moved by their appeals they will make us a present of this enormous sum. We could not think of it – they must bid higher.

The Eagle closes its “lamentation” by calling us a “meanly, corrupt negro-shrieking demagogue.” That’s what’s the matter. And it quotes an epigram, closing with

“A stable-man in the Post Office chair
Offends the gods and pollutes the air.”

What presumption! These Copperheads styling themselves “gods.” And then that a “stable-man” should be a Post Master. It was hard enough on them to see a “rail-splitter” and a “tailor” made President, and now when a “stable-man” is made Post Master, it offends the gods, or in other words, the Copperheads.

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Was the War a Failure?

            There is not a soldier in the land, but would give this question an indignant NO! But the man who writes for the Eagle, and who claims to be the friend and champion of soldiers, insists that it was, for he objected to the sentence which was printed on our Fourth of July bills which declared that, the war was NO FAILURE. He in connection with one or two others, kicked up a big fuss because our Fourth of July bills, which were issued as an invitation to soldiers to come and partake of the hospitalities of the citizens, contained that truthful declaration that the war had been no failure. One distinguished Copperhead, the first letters of whose name is James Campbell, came upon our premises and tore down one of those bills because of the offensive declaration in said bills, thus violating a city ordinance against the destruction of handbills, posters, &c. These Copperheads have the faculty of blowing hot and blowing cold in the same breath. They boldly proclaim that the war was a miserable failure – then they take a soldier by the hand and say, “Noble defender of our country,” “sun-browned hero,” “I greet your manly, vigorous form,” “we honor those to whom honor is due,” and then they settle back upon their old platform – “after four years of failure, &c. Of course, they are friends of soldiers. Who can doubt it.

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            → The man who writes for the Eagle claims to be a friend to the soldiers. How long is it since the editor of that sheet, with a sympathizing friend or two sat up all night in the office, armed with guns, pistols, bowie knives and bludgeons with the avowed purpose of massacreing the first soldier who should set foot in the office?

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Out Again.

We notice that our old companion in the war, James Welsh, has sufficiently recovered to be upon the streets again. He has been confined to his house for three or four weeks by a severe attack of fever.

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Accident.

As a daughter of Captain Lipe, of this city, was riding upon horse back Monday evening, the animal ran away with furious speed, and when opposite the residence of Mr. Burton, she was thrown to the ground, but fortunately escaped without serious injury.

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A Call.

We had a call this week from Harry Hampton, who has been for several months past publishing the New Era at Savannah, Missouri. He has sold out and is now “foot loose.” Harry served a full term of three years in the 16th Illinois, and made a bully good soldier.

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Watches Found.

On Tuesday morning of last week one of the section hands on the railroad, found near the Randolph street crossing, a parcel containing three gold watches and three silver watches. A day or two after a dispatch came along the lines making inquiry after them, as it was claimed they had been dropped from the cars. We suppose they have been restored to their owner by this time.

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Beauty and Utility.

We stepped into Ray’s Boot and Shoe store one day this week to make a purchase and we made note of the beauty and neatness of his store, and of his goods. We never saw a better quality of boots and shoes offered for sale. Mr. Ray manufactures largely himself and prides himself on selling a good article at as low rates as can be obtained elsewhere. He has the largest assortment of Hats and Caps to be found in the city.

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Removed.

Dr. J. H. Williams, of this city has recently located at Bardolph for the practice of his profession. He has been appointed agent for the Pioneer Stock Ins. Co., and will give his services in that line when called upon.

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Billy the Barber.

Has got into his new room on the east side. Billy has razors sharp enough to shave a mouse asleep without waking it. Billy’s shaving saloon is now the popular resort.

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Accident.

A conductor on a freight train at Colchester had two of his fingers of the right hand badly mangled this last week. One of the fingers was amputated. He was a returned soldier.

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The Equescurriculum.

This establishment that has met with special works of favorable consideration from the community wherever it has been, will be in Macomb on Saturday the 19th inst. As the institution was here last season, and made a decided impression upon our people, the announcement of its second annual visit, through the columns of the Journal, we should insure for it crowded houses, inasmuch as liberal attendees in[?] a reward those exhibitions that the people now are not of the humbug order. The Equescurriculum is all that its management claims for it, the best ever formed in the world. Mr. James Robinson, the famous and gifted bare back rider and madame Tourniaire and her troupe of French dancing horses are now included among the beauties of the Equescurriculum.

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The Issue to be Met.

Since the war has come to such a glorious conclusion, and 4,000,000 of human beings have been freed from slavery it has become evident that further guarantees are necessary to make that freedom and independence more complete.

John Venable, on the North side considers he will not be committing himself either for or against these measures for their further protection, we say that he has some of those unparalleled COVERLETS – warranted all wool – which he is willing to dispose of to any person or persons, Black or White – having the requisite amount of greenbacks.

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Fire.

The roof of the house lately occupied by [?] D. Steele, in the east part of town, but now occupied by Mr. Milligan, caught fire in the roof on Wednesday about noon, and would probably have been burned to the ground but for the timely discovery and prompt interference of Mr. William Gould, who happened to be passing at the time.

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“The Union Combination Show.”

This monster show will be in town on Tuesday, August 22d. We refer our readers to the advertisement for the catalogue of great attractions.

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Mr. Editor:

Please announce the name of Captain WILLIAM ERVIN, of the 84th Illinois, as a candidate for County Clerk, at the ensuing election, subject to the decision of a Union Convention.

MANY VOTERS.

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To Editor of Journal:

Please announce the name of COL. SAMUEL WILSON, late of the 16th Ill., as a candidate for the office of County Judge, subject to the decision of the Union County Convention, and oblige

MANY VOTERS.

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Watermelons.

This delicious fruit has made its appearance in town; they sell from forty to sixty cents apiece.

August 5, 1865

Macomb Eagle

“Wait Till the Solders Return Home.”

            At a meeting of the soldiers returning to their homes in Iowa, composed of detachments of the 2d, 3d, and 7, infantry regiments, held on board the steamer Keithsburg, they unanimously passed resolutions expressive of their views on regard to the political affairs of the state. The resolutions together with the names of the soldiers (two hundred and fifty in number,) were sent to a former captain in the volunteer service, who now resides in this city, and by him kindly shown to us.

The boys are very emphatic and decided in their opposition to conferring on the negroes the elective franchise, and declare they will vote for no candidates, for state or country officers, who stand on a platform in favor of striking out the word “white” from the article in our state constitution, on suffrage. This appears to be the almost universal opinion of the Iowa soldiers, as well as an overwhelming majority of the state, notwithstanding the republican party, by a vote of two to one, declared in their platform, lately adopted in their state convention, that it is a cardinal element of the republican party of Iowa, to give the negro the right to vote and hold office in this state that white men enjoy.

We regret that the want of space deprive us of the pleasure of publishing the proceedings of the soldiers meeting on board the Keithsburg, as well as the names of the soldier who participated in the same. – Keokuk Constitution.

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Hurricane at Davenport.

            The winds were let loose this morning at about 4 o’clock, and for a short time raged in a manner truly depreciating to real estate. A store house attached to Warren’s cooper shop, on Fifth and Warren streets, was blown over, and the empty flour barrels which it contained, scattered liberally about the city. Some were blown to the distance of half a mile.

Also, the wing of Charles Eckart’s residence, adjoining French and Davies’s mill, was blown off, considerable damage resulting.

The rood of Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4, of the Bazaar block, a bortion of which struck the Charley Cheever, and damaged it somewhat, while sheets of tin roofing were carried as far as Camp McClellan. The damage to the building will be about $1,500, and will fall upon R. B. Hill and Putman & Rodgers. A Skeel will also lose about $100 in consequence of falling timbers. A number of limbs from locust trees were found lodged in the roof this morning, which could not have come from any nearer point that the Scott house.

The Charley Cheever, lying at the wharf when the tempest came, broke loose, and having no steam up, was rapidly driven toward the bridge, till an anchor was dropped.

The New Boston, now awaiting repairs at Rock Island, was blown from her moorings, up toward the Rock island slough.

At Moline, trees nearly a foot in diameter were twisted asunder, and along Duck creek, fences were torn up, and haystacks scattered in the most devastating manner.

At our levee, a reaper weighing nearly a thousand pounds, was moved over twenty feet, while Shepherd’s gallery was moved into the middle of the street in the mildest possible manner. The damage to the farmers in our vicinity must have been considerable, but we have not yet learned to what extent.

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Post Office Changes.

            On last Friday morning the citizens of this place was considerably surprised by the report that Mr. J. E. Wyne, the postmaster at Macomb, had been removed and one Jas. K. Magie appointed his successor. This change was so unlooked for that at first the report was not credited, but it was soon settled beyond a doubt that it was so. A short time ago a petition was put in circulation to have Mr. Wyne reappointed, and there was not a citizen of any consequence that did not sign it, and this petition was forward to the postmaster general, and the people of this place settled down in the belief that that official would not disregard the wishes of the people, but would reappoint Mr. Wyne. – While we recognize the right to change postmasters, yet, we think before a change is made that, at least, the political friends of the party in power should first be consulted, and their wishes regarded. We know whereof we speak when we say that James K. Magie could not get twelve men of his own political faith in Macomb to sign a petition to recommend him to that position or any other. We will here say that if Mr. Magie will call a meeting of the friends of the administration for the purpose of ascertaining the wishes of the people in this matter, and if he receives the votes of twelve men for that position, we will cheerfully acquiesce in his appointment. Yea, we will even go further and say that if he can fid six men who would favor his appointment we will surrender his objection on our part to his appointment, and we will venture that the citizens of Macomb will do the same. We have heard of but one charge made against Mr. Wyne by Mr. Magie or his stool pigeons, and that is that Mr. Wyne gave us a job of work which amounted to the enormous sum of TWO DOLLARS. A heinous crime, surely. But if it was to any comfort to the gentlemen we will make him a present of that tremendous amount. As things considering this is about the nearest action, in a small way, that the postmaster general has been guilty of. A more unfit appointment, or one more generally dissatisfied to the people of this city and vicinity, could not possibly have been made. Mr. Wyne made a good officer, and we venture to say that during his four years in the post office, no well-grounded complaint has been made of his official conduct. He is removed to make room for a man whose only recommendation is that he is an [?] and meanly corrupt negro shielding demagogue. The latter is well described in the epigram:

“A dog into a horse pond thrown,
Goes to the bottom like a stone;
But buoyant grown as putrefies;
He begins together to rot and rise;
And when at last to the surface he goes,
Each passer by must hold his nose.
So the low land vile in their proper sphere,
Infect the general atmosphere;
But raised above their natural place,
Become a nuisance and disgrace,
A stable man in the post office chair,
Offends the gods and pollutes the air.”

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            → We again remind our readers that the eleventh exhibition of the McDonough County Agricultural Society will be held on the 27th, 28th, and 29th days of September next. In addition to the many other attractions, we notice that the society “hang out” a premium purse of $50 for the fastest pacer, and a purse of $25 sweepstakes, free for both pacers and trotters, the contest to be decided by each marvel speeding one mile. These are liberal premiums and will no doubt call out all the fast stock in this part of the country – including fast young men and pretty girls.

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            “Take my musket and perform my duty as a true and faithful soldier of my country.” – Magie’s Lamentations.

But you had not then thought of the [?] whenever the battle should begin in front.

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            “My heart and soul was in the work of subduing this rebellion,”   “knowing that an office in the army was a very good thing.” – Magie’s Lamentations.

The man’s eyes doubtless “bugged out” almost as large as they did when he took refuge in the rear rank as the sound of villainous rebel salt petre in the advance.

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            Assassination. – W. C. Coup arrived in town yesterday with his collection of Wax Statuary, among which may be seen the President lying in state on the beautifully decorated catafalce; the President and wife and Booth in the act of shooting him, life size pictures of Jeff Davis, Booth and Payne. The tent is erected on the lots west of Brown’s Hotel, on Jackson street. Will be on exhibition this Friday only.

 ——————–

            Dreadful Accident. – On Saturday last while Mr. William King, chief miller at the City Mills, was cleaning the elevator his clothing caught on the shaft of the wheat screen and not being able to extricate himself was thrown around in such a manner as to break both legs and arms. Medical assistance was called, but nothing could be done, and the poor man died about 1 o’clock p. m., after suffering intensely. The deceased leaves a wife and large family of children, who were entirely dependent upon him for support.

 ——————-

            Returned. – Pur young friends Dr. W. H. Anderson and Jas. S. Gash have returned from their visit to Minnesota. They were delighted with the country and represent the climate to be just the thing. They say the wheat prospects were never better. They returned sooner than they anticipated, owing to the fact that they could procure no accommodations at the lakes.

 ———————

“Playing Dog.”

            The editor of the Journal is “oxfully” exercised because we seen proper to speak in praise of the soldiers in the late war, and because we proposed to have a monument built in honor of their services. The Journal man calls this “playing dog.” The Journal man was doubtless thinking about the way he got to the post office when he penned that article. We do not claim to be the only friend the soldiers have, but we do claim that we think as much of them as the man who would induce a soldier to take his paper and after the soldier was killed urge his comrades to make up the pitiful sum. Now who “plays dog?”

 ——————–

            “I had a nice little arrangement prepared,” “the election of Hardin Hover was a surprise to me.” – Magie’s Lamentations.

It was certainly very [?] and stupid in the boys test to “disarm the prince,” and their [?] in the matter was certainly heightened by their electing a brickmaker over the polished and expectant Magie.

 ——————–

            “I was waiting to receive their votes,” but “I felt disappointed.” – Magie’s Lamentations.

How mildly he states the great sorrow that encumbered his soul and which finally brought on that distressing “looseness of he bowels” which unnerved his belly on the battle field.

 ——————–

            “I felt hurt.” – Magie’s Lamentations.

Yes, the diarrhea does gripe a fellow sometimes, and we are told that the music of rebel bullets “wasn’t a bit soothein’.”

 ——————-

            → Magie thinks he has sufficient capacity to take the post office. We should think he has after evacuating so many battlefields in the south.

“The Blandinville company lacked the number of men required to muster in, and so I joined this company.” – Magie’s Lamentations.

This is the first “flank movement” on record. It is too much to suppose that Grant and Sherman learned this brilliant manuevre from our unknown hero? And have they too, like Capt. Reynolds, ignored his distinguished services through “spite” and “political prejudice”?

 ——————–

            “There were some who were lifted up above their natural and proper level.” “I was appointed sergeant.” – Magie’s Lamentations.

Magie is ot the first man who has been lifted by straps above his natural and proper level. They would have graced him better had they been placed across his back and bottom.

August 4, 1865

Macomb Journal

LIFE IN THE ARMY.

Being the Observations and Experiences
of a Private Soldier.

By J. K Magie.

CHAPTER III.

(Continued.)

            On Friday, the 19th of September, an order was received for the men to prepare two days’ cooked rations, and be ready to strike tents and depart the next day Southward. All was bustle and excitement. We had been nearly a month in camp, and the daily routine had become somewhat irksome and tedious, and the prospect of a change was greeted with cheers of delight. Our pork was boiled up in large kettles, and a proper share meted out to each man. We had been using soft bread of a tolerably good quality, and the little delicacies we had procured from home, together with the luxury of butter, &c., which could be purchased in Quincy, we had made out a pretty good living. But when we came to fill our haversacks with a huge chunk of fat, greasy pork, and a lot of the hardest and toughest crackers that we had ever seen or heard tell of, the prospect of good living utterly vanished, and we began to have some ideas of what it was to soldier.

A day or two previous to the receipt of marching orders, the arms and accroutremensts of the regiment had been received. Upon examination they were found to be the old revolutionary flint locks, altered to percussion. The officers condemned them forthwith, and the Colonel refused to distribute them to the men. They were not taken out of the boxes in which they were packed, but they were nailed up again until the proper authorities could be consulted in reference to better arms.

The morning of the 20th of September, 1862, broke clear and unclouded. In the early part of the day our tents were struck and packed. It was about noon time when we were marched to the depot. There we found a train of open platform cars awaiting us. The horses of the Colonel and field officers were duly loaded upon the train, and the tents and other baggage belonging to the regiment were nicely loaded in box cars. The arms and accoutrements which we were expected to use, but upon which the scale of condemnation had been place, were also put upon the train. The citizens turned out in pretty large numbers to see us off. One enthusiastic and patriotic old man brought out a small cannon and boomed away most vigorously. The hour hand had pointed to nearly four o’clock in the afternoon before the train moved off. But it moved at last, carrying away a thousand beating hearts, anxious, but hopeful of the future. We left in camp the 84th and 119th regiments. The organization of the 84th was completed before that of the 78th, and they were better prepared for marching orders than the latter. The order to march was undoubtedly meant for the 84th, as the original number of the 84th was the 78th, but was afterward changed for the following reason. When Colonel Waters was commissioned, he was assigned to the 78th regiment, but learning afterward that A. V. Humphrey, of Quincy, had been commissioned as Quarter Master for the 78th, he wished to have another person for that position, and as he would not interfere with Mr. Humphrey’s commission, Colonel Waters had the number of his regiment changed to that of the 84th, and thus avoided all difficulty, and took in as his Quarter Master, the man of his choice.

Our train headed for Springfield, at which place we arrived about 12 o’clock at night. Here we stopped about one hour waiting for orders, which being received, the train continued eastward. We passed Decatur a little after day light. The country all along gave evidence of industry, prosperity and plenty. About ten o’clock we reached the station known as State Line, where the train made a halt of an hour or more. This was a little village of about a hundred houses, and as its name indicates that it was located on the dividing between the States of Ills. and Ind. It was a quiet Sabbath morning, and the citizens of this little village were quietly wending their way to church. The boys of the regiment had began to feel –

“The keen demands of appetite,”

and had failed to derived that same satisfaction from the contents of their haversacks, as when seated around the well spread table at home. They looked with longing, wishful eyes at the back kitchens of the several houses contiguous to the depot, where the train was standing, and soon there was a general scattering out of a hundred or more on tours of observation and exploration. In a short time there might have been seen the same number returning with smiling countenance, almost every one bringing with him a bone, a loaf of bread, or a pie, which was duly distributed to the less venturesome, but not less hungry comrades.

After a change of engines the train was soon speeding along. The boys all seemed to be lively and in good spirits, notwithstanding the very uncomfortable accommodations which had been furnished us. We were exposed to the dust, the cinders, and at night to the falling dew. The dampness of the night, rendered us in first rate condition to retain all the dust and cinders which struck our faces and clothing. It was sometimes impossible to recognize our most intimate friends, so begrimed with dust and smoke were their countenances. But every body was lively and cheerful, the sun shown pleasantly, the country through which we were passing was beautiful, and the people everywhere greeted us with cheers, and the waving of hats and handkerchiefs. The “boys,” as we will persist in calling them, although some were grey with age, returned the cheers with vigor, and craked their jokes one with another, as though we were on a holiday excursion instead of a mission that would inevitably prostrate at least, half of us by disease or death. It was very inconvenient for us to procure as much butter as we needed. At Lafayette, Indiana, every man was furnished with a canteen, and at that point we had good opportunity to fill them. After leaving Lafayette I noticed that a “certain few” became thirsty quite often and had recourse to one particular canteen to slacken their thirst. We had a certain individual in our company whom we called “Pate,” although he would answer to the name of “coal-digger.” He was a comical genius, and over-floawed with good nature and genuine wit. Pate saw the suspicious canteen, and at once became very thirsty. He called to one of his companions – “Will you please to pass that water this way.” Pate took the canteen with an air of innocent simplicity, and putting it to his lips took several swallows, when suddenly taking it from his mouth, he handed it back with an offended air as though he had been imposed upon. “Here,” said he, “I thought I was drinking water all the time, and it was nothing but whisky.”

We reached Indianapolis just before sundown. The people lined the railroad by thousands, greeting us with cheers of genuine joy. At this particular juncture it will be remembered that the rebel Bragg was approaching Louisville with an army, said to be a hundred thousand strong. With Louisville in possession of the rebels Indianapolis would be seriously threatened, and of course the citizens hailed with intense satisfaction the arrival of every train load of troops that was sent forward to repel the advance of the [fold].

Indianapolis is certainly a beautiful city. It is a great railroad centre, and its rapid growth from business, wealth and population is almost without a parallel in the great west. I was struck with the beauty and the thrift of the place, and my subsequent visits to that city have only confirmed [?] in my first impressions.

Our train reached Jeffersonville a little before daylight on Monday morning. This is a city of some ten or fifteen thousand inhabitants, located on the banks of the Ohio river, on the Indiana side, immediately opposite the city of Louisville. We had no orders to leave the cars, and so we huddled down and quietly snoozed, as best we could, until daylight.

[TO BE CONTINUED.]

 ——————–

            Erratta. – We were absent a day or two from the city the present week, and our outside form was put to press during our absence. We notice several errors in our sketch of “Life in the Army.” The comical genius that we wrote about was “Pete,” and not “Pate.” And the article that was so inconvenient to procure was “water,” and not “butter,” although the latter article was obsolete with us. There are other errors of minor importance which the sense of the reader will correct.

 ——————–

The Post Office.

Through the kindness and partiality of the “powers that be,” the appointment of Postmaster of the city of Macomb, has been conferred upon our humble self. Of course our own opinion is that this appointment was “eminently fit to be made.” The Administration might have gone farther and faced worse. It has probably disturbed the feelings of some that so worthy an individual as Mr. Wyne should be set aside for so unpretending an individual as our peculiar self. The Copperheads don’t like it overmuch. They are as full of sympathy for the old incumbent as they were for Mr. Seward when Mr. Lincoln was nominated over that distinguished individual for President. But the deed is done, and we shall probably take possession of the Post Office in the course of the coming week.

We expect to devote our personal attention to the duties of the office. Our editorial connection with the Journal will remain the same. Whether we shall fill the position of Postmaster with as much satisfaction to the community as has the old incumbent, only remains to be seen. We can cheerfully bear testimony to the faithful, and industrious manner in which Mr. Wyne has performed the duties of his office. But in this country “rotation” is the order of the day. We have very few life offices to bestow upon individuals. We shouldn’t wonder if some day some enterprising individual would rotate us out and himself in. We should expect then to share the sympathy of those who now think it was upwise to make a change.

There has been considerable speculation as to the future location of the Post Office. It will remain where it is, at least for several weeks to come; and if it should eventually be removed, it will not be to any less convenient location or less commodious room than where it is now.

 ——————–

            What are we Coming to. – A prominent Copperhead of this city was overwhelmed with surprise on learning of the change in the Post Office. After reflecting a moment he broke out – “Westfall turned out of the Express office and now Wyne turned out of the Post Office – G-d d-n such an Adminstration.” Take it easy, man; take it easy, and at the next election vote against the Express company.

 ——————–

            → A few weeks ago the Eagle published quite a sensation article under the title of “The Beginning,” in which it discussed the awful consequences, in a moral point of view, of the presence among us of “colored nuisances.” A little circumstance occurred two or three weeks since in this city, in which a little “colored nuisance” was involved, that would have been an excellent text for the Eagle to have preached a long sermon upon, and we are surprised that the Eagle has been so mum over the affair. One of our most respectable Copperhead citizens employs in his family a little colored girl of some twelve or fourteen years of age.  A lady neighbor the other day heard cries issuing from an outhouse located at the back of the garden, and rushing hither she was just in time to see the sturdy form of a white man rushing with break neck pace from the scene, leaving the little “colored nuisance” in much distress of mind and body. That same man has wore out the seat of his breeches setting on dry goods boxes and declaiming against nigger equality.

 ——————-

            → Our carrier boy is sick this week and we will be obliged to put a new carrier upon the route. We will try and have our city subscribers all served, but there will be no doubt be some overlooked. All irregularities will be promptly remedied if reported at this office.

 ——————–

A Beautiful Exhibition.

There is on exhibition in a spacious pavilion a short distance west of Brown’s Hotel a splendid collection of life size statuaries in wax, representing nearly all the characters connected with the assassination plot at Washington. This is really a splendid exhibition, and our citizens will be amply repaid the little expense attending a visit to it. It will remain but a short time – perhaps close to-day.

 ——————–

The Weather.

It cleared up on Saturday last and no rain fell until Wednesday evening, when we were visited by a heavy shower. The clear weather of the early part of the week has enabled our farmers to make considerable progress in gathering their oat and hay crops. The wheat crop is not damaged as much as feared. Full one-half can be saved in good condition. As we go to press the weather promises favorable.

 ——————–

Another Accident.

On Monday last George Chapman, a son of James Chapman, Esq., had the misfortune to break his right leg below the knee, by rolling down a steep embankment at the creek just north of town. It seems that the boys of this city are in the habit of going to the creek to swim, and fool away their time, and while there, they initiate others by making a “slide” by throwing water on a steep place and then sliding down. This was the cause of young Chapman’s misfortune. We hope other boys may take warning.

 ——————–

Improvements.

            Our city is slowly but steadily improving all the time, and we observe that houses are being put up in every part of the city. This is as it should be, but still the supply of dwelling and business houses do not equal the demand. Rents are enormously high, and will be till more houses are built than are called for.

We notice that W. H. Neece’s house is about completed. This house is situated in the west part of the city, just north of the depot, and is a fine structure.

Mr. A. Hunt is putting up a large dwelling on Jefferson street, between Lafayette and McArthur.

George Kruse has put in a new front to his machine bakery, and has considerably enlarged it by building an addition to the back end.

The side-walks are being rebuilt in all parts of the city – a needed improvement.

 ———————

A Terrible Accident!

On Saturday last Mr. William King, the head miller at the mill of CLisby & Trull, was killed by being caught and wound around the shaft of the wheat screen. It appears that a spout that lead the wheat from the elevator to the screen, got choked by some rags, and Mr. King went up to the place to remove the difficulty, and while so doing, the tail of his coat was caught by the revolving shaft of the screen, when he was instantly doubled up over the shaft. By his body being on the shaft, it was thrown out of gear, or else his body would have been torn into pieces. The hands of the mill immediately saw that something was wrong, when James Binnie ran up stairs and found Mr. King in the situation above described. The machinery was stopped, and Mr. King taken from the shaft, still alive but terribly mangled. This occurred about ten o’clock A M., and he lingered in great agony till one o’clock, when he died. His body was taken to Brookland for burial. Mr. King leaves a wife and several children who were dependent upon for their support.

We would state here, that if readers and others having wheat to grind, would be more careful to thoroughly clean their wheat before bringing to mill, there would be less danger, and less liability to accidents of the nature above described.

 ——————–

Robbery.

On Thursday morning of this week an old gentleman named Jefferds, living three or four miles south-east of this city, hitched up his nag to ride to town. After proceeding on his journey a mile or two, he overtook a stranger and kindly invited him to ride. The weather being warm the old man threw off his coat, a pocket of which contained a roll of bills, amounting to three hundred dollars. The stranger got out of the wagon near the Randolph House, and Mr. Jefferds drove on a short distance, when he proceeded to leave his wagon, and putting on his coat discovered that his money was missing. The stranger was also missing.

 ——————–

Cigars and Tobacco.

Mr. F. M. Schafer, has sold his tobacco and cigar factory to Mr. Ernst G. Schuchard. Mr. Schafer goes to Chicago. We are sorry to part with Frank, and wish him success in his new field. Mr. Schuchard has the reputation of being a good cigar maker, and hope he will enjoy the patronage that was bestowed upon Mr. Schafer.

 ——————–

Personal.

Dr. William H. Anderson and Mr. James T. Gash, who have been on a health-seeking trip to Minnesota, have returned home, greatly benefitted by their excursion. They both look very much improved in health, and report Minnesota as being a fine place to live in, but board is very high and hard to get at any price, owing to the great influx of travelers, and location seekers.

 ——————–

Gone South.

Colonel L. H. Waters, late Colonel of the 84th regiment, contemplates removing South this Fall, and started last Monday to perfect his arrangements there, before removing his family. Huntsville, Alabama, is the place he has selected for his future residence.

 ——————–

            → Mr. W. D. Steele, a well know school teacher of this city, has sold his residence in this city, and designs to remove to Indiana, to commence the practice of medicine. Mr. Steele is a successful teacher, and we believe will make a successful physician. Our best wishes go with him.

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