April 15, 1865: Second Extra

Macomb Journal

Assassination of President Lincoln.

            Washington, April 15, 1865.

            Abraham Lincoln died this a. m. at 22 minutes past 7 o’clock.

E. M. Stanton.

 

Chicago, April 15, 1865.

            President Lincoln was shot through the head last night at Ford’s theatre, and died this A. M. The assassin is supposed to be J. Wilkes Booth, the actor. About the same time a desperado called at Secretary Seward’s, pretending to be a messenger from his physician. Being refused admittance he attacked Fred. Seward, son of the Secretary, knocking him down, then passing passing on to the Secretary’s room, when after cutting down two male attendants, he cut Mr. Seward’s throat. The wound was not at last accounts considered fatal.

Letters found in Booth’s trunk show that this assassination was contemplated before the 4th of March, but fell through from some cause. The wildest excitement prevails at Washington about the President’s house. The residences of the different Secretaries are closely guarded.

Chicago Office.

            Later. – Sec’y Seward remains without change. Fred Seward’s skull is fractured in two places besides severe cuts on the head. The attendants are still alive but hopeless. Maj. Seward’s wounds are not dangerous. It is ascertained certainly that two assassins were engaged in the horrible crime.

Wilkes Boothe being the one that shot the President. The names of his companions are not known, but their descriptives are given.

Papers found in Boothe’s trunk show that the murder was planned before the 4th of March, but fell through then because the accomplice backed out until Richmond could be heard from – Boothe and his accomplices leaving.

Boothe and his accomplices were at the livery stable at 6 o’clock last evening and left there, with three horses, about 10 o’clock, or shortly before that hour. It would seem that they had been running their chances. But the reason it was not carried into effect before last night, is not known. One of them has evidently made his way to Baltimore; the other has not been traced.

E. M. Stanton.

April 15, 1865: Extra!

Macomb Journal

Assassination of President Lincoln.

            Washington, April 15, 1865.

            Abraham Lincoln died this a. m. at 22 minutes past 7 o’clock.

E. M. Stanton.

Chicago, April 15, 1865.

            President Lincoln was shot through the head last night at Ford’s theatre, and died this A. M. The assassin is supposed to be J. Wilkes Booth, the actor. About the same time a desperado called at Secretary Seward’s, pretending to be a messenger from his physician. Being refused admittance he attacked Fred. Seward, son of the Secretary, knocking him down, then passing passing on to the Secretary’s room, when after cutting down two male attendants, he cut Mr. Seward’s throat. The wound was not at last accounts considered fatal.

Letters found in Booth’s trunk show that this assassination was contemplated before the 4th of March, but fell through from some cause. The wildest excitement prevails at Washington about the President’s house. The residences of the different Secretaries are closely guarded.

Chicago Office.

Macomb Eagle

 PRES. LINCOLN
ASSASSINATED.

SECRETARY SEWARD’S
THROAT CUT.

HIS SON, HIS NEPHEW AND TWO
NURSES KILLED.

THE NATION IN MOURNING.

          The following dispatch was received here this morning. This news was so unexpected, that at first few credited the news, but it being confirmed, sorrow was depicted on every countenance, all business was immediately suspended, flags dressed in mourning and hung at half mast, and the Church bells tolled forth the sad intelligence. Thus, at the hands of an assassin and murderer, has fallen the nation’s most honored son.

Telegraph Office,
Chicago, April 15, 1865.

To all Offices:

President Lincoln was assassinated last night while at Ford’s Theatre. He was shot through the head and died this morning. Secretary Seward was assassinated and his throat cut by a desperado, who cut down his son Fred. and his nephew and two nurses before reaching the Secretary. At last accounts he was still alive.

Signed,        Chicago Office.

April 15, 1865

Macomb Eagle

Oil in McDonough County.

            Blessed be St. Peter-Oleum! The oil region is not confined to the mountains of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. – The coal regions of Illinois, there is reason to believe, are rich with oil. Our own county, which is known to possess extensive beds of the best coal in the West, offers peculiar inducements to prospectors for petroleum. – Surface indications of the existence of this oil have been observed in several localities in this county. The strongest of these indications have for some time been noticed on the land of Mr. Wilson and Mr. Saffell, some three miles southwest of Macomb. These indications are pronounced by persons who have examined the oil regions of Pennsylvania, to be precisely similar to the surface evidences in that region. So well satisfied are the gentlemen owning the land that oil can be had for the boring, that they are making the necessary arrangements for testing the extent of the oil reservoirs which underlie their land. A steam engine is already on the spot ready for work, and the other apparatus for boring will shortly be procured.

These indications of oil have also been observed in the vicinity of Colchester, and as soon as the spring rains hold up a little, they will no doubt attract attention. In addition to this, the same indications of petroleum are strongly manifest at certain points within the corporate limits of Macomb. Truly, unless the sequel shall falsify the appearances, there is a mine of wealth slumbering in the bowels of McDonough county, compared to which the treasures of California are but as dross.

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            A Novelty. – It is not so much a novelty either (when we know about it) because when two persons pleases every one they come in contact with, it is not so strange that they should succeed in what they undertake to do. This is being proven by Hawkins & Philpot, photographers, they being of that kind, it is no wonder that they have so many calls for pictures.

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            First National Bank of Macomb. – This institution, organized under the laws of the United States, will be opened for business next Monday. The advertisement in another column will show that some of the ablest and soundest financial men of our city are directors of the Bank, and whose names are a sufficient guarantee for success in its operations and safety to its patrons. The books of the Bank will be kept open for further subscription to its capital stock, and we recommend those who may have surplus funds or Government bonds, to invest them in this Bank. The facilities which it will afford to our business men will be duly appreciated by the public.

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            Save Your Money. – If you want to save money when buying your clothing, go to the store of Dernham & Jehlinger, on the west side of the square, two doors south of Brown’s Hotel. They have a mammoth stock of new clothing, which they are selling at less than wholesale prices. They also have a large stock of Gents’ Furnishing Goods which they are selling very cheap. Give them a call.

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            New Firm. – Mr. D. G. Tunnicliff has associated with himself in the practice of law, Mr. Asa Matteson, of Galesburg. These gentlemen are able lawyers, and we are assured that all business entrusted to their care will receive prompt attention.

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            → Dr. S. Ritchey of the City Drug Store has lately been improving his store. It now presents as neat an appearance as any business house in Macomb. The Dr. has procured the services of Mr. J. W. Miller, as accomplished prescriptionist and drug clerk. All orders will receive prompt attention. – Give him a call.

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            To the Public. – As there will, in all probability, be a large turn out of the people of the county, on Saturday next, we would most respectfully say to them that George Bailey, on the east side, will sell PRINTS AT TWELVE AND A HALF CENTS PER YARD. This is no HUMBUG, got up in order to deceive, but if you don’t believe it, go and see for yourselves.

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            Small Pox. – Dr. Blaisdell, has some fresh vaccine virus and is ready to vaccinate all who may call at his office on the south side of the square.

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            → Small Pox in Macomb. – This disease made is appearance in our city one day last week, and there is already three cases of it. We think it the duty of the city authorities to take steps to prevent the further spread of this loathsome disease. Let them either build a pest house and remove those afflicted to it, or else fence up the streets where the disease is located.

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            → We notice that Knapper & Cyrus have been putting in a new front to their store room, and otherwise improving the appearance of the Old corner. They are enterprising and gentlemanly men, and those in need of groceries will do well to give them a call.

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            → At the annual township election the republicans elected 5 supervisors, and the Unionists 11. We have not yet learned whether the bounty tax was carried or not in this county, but probably will by next Christmas.

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History of the Plow.

            The first plow is supposed to have been the rude branch of a tree, cut so as to have a cleft end, the point of which, dragged along the surface of the ground, scraped a furrow in which seeds were thrown. It soon occurred to the husbandmen that he might receive his own labor by yoking an animal to the long arm of this primitive instrument; then arose the necessity for a handle, affixed to the back, so that the plough might be guided. – The strength of the animal soon wore away or broke the cleft of the branch, and this necessity gave rise to the invention of means for attaching moveable shares, first of wood, and next of stone, copper, or iron, worked to a shape adapted to the cutting of furrows, so as to avoid the excessive labor arising from the plowman’s having to lean upon his plow with all his weight to press it into the ground. – Just such an implement as these conjectures indicate was used by the Saxons. Some of the facts connected with the history of the plow are almost incredible. In Ireland there once prevailed a custom of “ploughing by the horse’s tail.” The draught pole was lashed to the tail of the horse, and as no harness was employed, two men were necessary, one to guide and press upon the plow, the other to direct the horse, which he did by walking backwards before the miserable animal, and beating it heavily on the head on either side, according to the direction required. This custom prevailed for a considerable time in spite of a law which was passed in the early part of the seventh century, imposing severe penalties upon persons found guilty of “ploughing by the horse’s tail,” as in the act mentioned and described. – From the Rev. C. Otway’s “Sketches in Erris and Tyrawly,” it appears that the barbarous practice lingered in the remote west of Ireland late as the year 1840! And from a paper, “On the breed of horses in Scotland in the Ancient Times,” printed in the first volume of the ‘Transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland,’ we find that the same custom was practiced in that country as late as the year 1792. – Progress of Agriculture.

April 14, 1865

Macomb Journal

From Savannah to Goldsboro.

            We copy the following letter from the Quincy Whig and Republican, hoping it will prove of interest to a majority of our readers, as the most of them have relations and friends with Sherman. It gives a very good history of the grand march through the heart of the rebellion. The letter is dated at Goldsboro, N. C., March 29th, 1865:

“I must give you a brief account of our recent march from Savannah to this place, though in a short letter I can give but few of the thousand incidents that made our march interesting. We started from Savannah on the 19th of January, but owing to heavy rains, swollen streams and bad roads, on the 5th of February we had only crossed the Savannah river, 40 miles above Savannah, at a point known as Sister’s Ferry, celebrated in history as being the place where mad Anthony Wayne crossed his little army of patriots when sent to assist in expelling the British from Georgia during the days that ‘tried men’s souls.’ But how different the scene, how great the contrast between those days and these. No well appointed army, well supplied with all the appliances of war, followed in his train; but we behold a little band of hardy patriots crossing the river in canoes and dugouts, swimming their horses by their side, and leaving their artillery on the South Carolina shore for the want of means to cross it over. The river was very high, and the bottom on the South Carolina side being very low and wide, we had to bridge and corduroy for a distance of nearly three miles before we struck the high lands beyond.

After crossing, we lay a couple of days receiving supplies that had been brought p the river in boats to this point, and on the 8th we broke camp, severed our communications once more, and struck out into the heart of rebeldom. We passed up the river 35 or 40 miles in the direction of Augusta, the country abounding in large plantations, where was once the abode of wealth, luxury and refinement, but now scenes of devastation and ruin, smoking and smouldering habitations, fences destroyed and farms laid waste. What could not be taken along or converted to the use of the army was committed to the flames or destroyed.

South Carolina has many sins to answer for. The piteous wailings of the millions of hearts made desolate by this unjust and unnecessary war demand that justice shall be meted out to this rebellious State. The cold, mute forms of our beloved comrades resting beneath the sod of Shiloh, Gettysburg, Chickamauga, and the thousand battles of this cruel war, rise up in their graves, and pointing their stiff bony fingers at South Carolina, mutely call upon us for revenge. Resting, did I say? Nay! they cannot rest till God’s vengeance is satisfied.

Leaving the river, we turned toward the east, passing through Barnwell, an old, wealthy and aristocratic town – a very hot-bed for secession sentiments – but it was left a hot-bed of coals. – Still passing on north, we crossed the Augusta & Charleston Railroad at Williston Station. The 1st and 3d divisions of the 14th Corps crossed the road farther to the west, and the other corps crossed it farther to the east, so that it was effectually destroyed from Branchville nearly to Augusta. This was the case with all the roads in the State that we came in contact with. We struck them at different points and destroyed them effectually as we went along.

Crossing the railroad at Williston, we pushed on across the North and South Edisto to Lexington, a town about 12 miles west of Columbia. Now we turned east, and passing within sight of Columbia, we crossed the Saluda river about eight miles above the city, and passing up between the Saluda and Broad rivers, we crossed the latter stream about 20 miles above Columbia, (the 15th and 17th corps crossed the river below the city, and occupied Columbia, our wing of the army did not enter the town.) After crossing the Broad, we continued up in the direction of Monticello, and crossed the Columbia and Danville railroad, about 10 miles above Winnsboro, at what is called White Oak Station. Now again the 1st division of our corps were sent up in the direction of Chesterville, and destroyed the road well up into Chester county.

From White Oak Station we tured east and crossed the Catawba river in the southern part of Lancaster county. From thence we took a pretty direct course, passing west and north of Chesterfield and crossed the Great Pedee near the line between North and South Carolina. The 15th and 17th corps crossed the river at Cheraw, about 8 miles below our crossing, when they had a fight with a part of Hardee’s command that had evacuated Charleston and presumed to dispute our progress. We captured here large quantities of ammunition and 17 pieces of artillery.

Crossing the river, we marched a direct course to Fayetteville, which place we entered without opposition on the 11th March, the enemy having retired across the river the night previous, and destroyed the bridge in the rear. We lay at Fayetteville till the 15th, sending in the meantime our sick and wounded down the river to Wilmington on small steamers that had come up the river to meet us. We also had an opportunity of sending away a mail to the north, telling those anxious, waiting hearts at home of our safety and progress.

On the 15th we resumed our march again for this place, the right wing (15th and 17th corps) moving directly towards Goldsboro, while the left wing (14th and 20th corps) took the road up the river towards Raleigh.

On the 16th our advance encountered the rebels, about 4 miles south of Aveysport, drawn up in heavy force behind works, ready to dispute our further advance in that direction. We fought them all the afternoon, driving them from one position after another, and capturing 3 pieces of artillery. In the night they fell back and left the road open to us.

From here we turned our direction east towards Goldsboro, and on the 19th inst., when 20 miles from here, we found ourselves confronted by the whole combined forces of rebels outside of Richmond, commanded by Gen. Johnston in person. They had concocted a nice little scheme to whip Gen. Sherman’s army by detail before a concentration could take place, and during nearly all day of the 19th, when the principal fighting occurred, and the 1st and 2d divisions of the 14th corps sustained the entire shock of the rebel army. The 1st division was forced back, and for a time our division (the 2d) was compelled, unaided and alone, to do battle against the overwhelming hosts that were precipitated against us. Bullets came whistling into our ranks from every direction, but the old division of veterans maintained its ground, beat off its assailants, and covered itself with glory. In the evening the 20th corps came up, and the next day the 15th and 19th corps arrived and took possession, and the rebels were very glad to get out of a bad scrape, for it has been a sore undertaking for them.

But we are here at Goldsboro, having accomplished all that we started to do. We are satisfied, and we think the country ought to be. The army is in good spirits, and ready to march on again if need be to still greater and more brilliant achievements.

But the mail is just leaving, and I cannot write more. With much respect very truly your friend,

STEDMAN HATCH.

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THE END!

The Old Flag All Right!

GRANT HAS CAPTURED
LEE AND HIS WHOLE
Army.

Nickodemus is
Awake!

Peace on the Wing,
Coming to the U. S.

THE DAY OF JUBILEE
HAS COME!

Jeff. Still A Fugitive.

          We again have the pleasure of announcing another great victory – one that we can exult over long and loud – Lee, the Commander-in-Chief of the rebel army has surrendered to Grant. The Army of Virginia (rebel) is no more – a thing of the past. Grant has paroled them all on condition of not again taking up arms against the Government of the United States until exchanged, and as they have none of our men in their possession, is tantamount to an agreement never to take up arms again.

The Old Flag is again all right. Jeff. Davis is still a fugitive. Glory! Hallelujah. – Nickodemus is awake, and sees it all.

The Legislature of Virginia will, in all probability, soon meet in Richmond and adopt the Constitutional amendment abolishing slavery, and once more return to her place in the Union.

Thus, one by one, will the States return and be gladly welcomed.

The following is the correspondence between Gens. Grant and Lee, in relation to the terms of surrender:

April 9, 1865.

            General – I just received your note this morning, on the picket line, whither I came to meet you and ascertain definitely what terms were embraced in your proposition of yesterday with reference to the surrender of this army. I now request an interview in accordance with the offer contained in yours of yesterday for that purpose. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R E Lee, General.

            To Lieutenant General Grant, commanding United States forces.

April 9, 1865.

            General R. E. Lee, Commanding Confederate States Armies:

Your note of this date is but this moment (11:50 A. M.) received, in consequence of my having passed from the Richmond and Lynchburg Road to the Farmville and Lynchburg Road. I am at this writing about four miles west of Walters’ Church, and will push forward to the front for the purpose of meeting you. Notice sent to me on this road, where you wish the interview to take place, will meet me.

Very respectfully your ob’t serv’t.

U. S. GRANT, Lieut. Gen.

Appomattox Court House,
April 9, 1865.

Gen. R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A.,

In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th inst., I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to-wit: Rolls of all officers and men to be made in duplicate, one copy to be given to the officer designated by me, the other to be retained by such officers as you may designate; the officers to give their individual paroles not to take arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged, and each company or regimental commander to sign a like parole for the men of their commands. The arms, artillery, and public property to be packed and stacked and turned over to the officer appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side arms of officers nor their private horses or baggage. This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by the United States authority so long as they observe their parole and the laws in force where they may reside.                  Very Respectfully,

U. S. Grant, Lieut. Gen.

Hdqrs., Army Northern Va.
9th April, 1865.

Lieut. Gen. Grant, Commanding U. S. A.:

General – I have received your letter of this date, containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, as proposed by you. As they are substantially the same as those expressed in your letter of the 8th inst., they are accepted. I will proceed to designate the proper officers to carry the stipulations into effect.

Very resp’y, your ob’t servant,

R. E. Lee, General.

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THE END APPROACHES.

            Now that Richmond has fallen, and Lee has surrendered his whole army, light begins once more to dawn upon our beloved country. We can now look into the future and see peace and prosperity reign once more in our land. – We can see the North and South hand-in-hand, working together for one common end. Slavery is dead and no more will it tend to divide us. We can now give our attention exclusively to commerce, and the arts and sciences, and make our Government what it was designed to be by the Almighty – the great center of civilization, the land to which the oppressed of all countries can flee and dwell in safety.

Before our paper goes to press, we no doubt will hear of the surrender of Johnston and his army, and then the rebels will have no army left; then the proclamation will go forth from our worthy President, announcing the glad tidings of PEACE, the supremacy of the laws maintained, and the Union restored, and then we will have one grand jubilee, then will the shout be raised from millions of people, “Glory to God in the highest, and peace on earth, and good will to all men.”

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Hypocritical Rejoicing.

            The proprietors of the secesh concern actually went through the motions yesterday of rejoicing over the downfall of their master Jeff’s kingdom, by hanging out an American flag, and letting off some fire-works from the roof of their building. This is the sort of homage that vice pays to virtue. There were outward semblances of joy to conceal the gnawings of inward grief. – Grant’s great achievements strike as much consternation into Copperheads as Confederates. He has shivered both wings of latter day “Democracy.” The bolt that shattered the one knocked over the other. In life they were united. In death, let them not be divided. – Chicago Tribune.

We cannot make any such charge as the above against the secesh concern in this city. Not a cheer went up from the throat of the editor, nor was his office illuminated by a “loan tallow candle,” but “like his mind, was all darkness within.”

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POETRY.

Written for the Journal.

RICHMOND IS FALLEN!

O, why this glad shouting all over the land
The cannons quick boom and the bright beacon-brand?
Whence has arisen this sun on our sky?
Scatt’ring the clouds from its brightness away?
Speak, ye fair hills – can you tell me
Why the air is filled with wild ecstacy?

The hills answer not, and I turn to the wire,
That quivers with all a warm heart’s desire.
I watch its quick beatings, and read, while I gaze,
“Proud Richmond is fallen!” and then, in amaze,
The wild floods of feeling rush to and fro,
Telling what thoughts are swelling below.

Oh why, in wild echoes joining the shout
Should my deepest tones not in gladness ring out?
Why – why the low cry of anguish and pain,
As I read the sentence again and again?
Ah! the breast loves can never quite bow at the shrine
Of patriot feeling – at least cannot mine.

Through fancy keen eye-glass, I see yonder field,
Where love ‘gainst the murderous shot was no shield;
Low lie there the hopes of thousands of homes,
Struck down in the sight of Richmond’s proud domes.
My brothers! O God; are they with the slain?
Hush! cannon and shouting, you jar on my brain.

O, Father! who dwellest in yonder pure sky,
Look down on thy creatures with pitying eye;
And soon, by thine own kingly power and love,
Bid this demon of war from our country remove,
Heal heart-throbs now gaping so terribly wide,
And staunch in thy mercy this swift gushing tide.

Mrs. Hattie K. Crissman.

            Macomb, April 10, 1865.

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Shall We Have a Foreign War?

            Now the rebellion is near an end; the question of a foreign war begins to agitate the country. It is well known that France has violated the Monroe doctrine, in the case of Mexico, and England the neutrality laws, by fitting out privateers to make war upon our commerce, and it is the duty of our government to call upon them to make full restitution for all injury that we may have sustained by such violation. Will they do it? We think they will, for the reason it would be worse than folly for them to engage in a war with us at the present time when our armies have the prestige of victory upon them, when they are not only willing, but anxious, to engage in a war with them, and when we have the largest and best navy in the world. The word would only have to be said and the whole combined navy of France and England would be wiped from the seas. Such being the case, we think there will be no fear of such a war, and that all demands will be satisfied on presentation.

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            ‒ The war for the preservation of the Union has lasted four years. During the first half of it, the Democrats dictated the war policy of the Government, and “run” the army according to their ideas of how to deal with a slaveholders’ rebellion. Remember the result. Failure was written on every page and marked every step. During the last two years, the policies of the Republicans have been applied to the conduct of the war, and behold the result! The rebellion lies prostrate and defunct at the feet of the Union. The Democratic party is shown itself to be a miserable sham, and its Union saving professions to be humbug and secession in disguise, and thinly disguised at that.

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            ‒ Those who enlist now will, in all probability, never smell powder, but will draw as much pay as if they had fought and died for their country. A word to the wise is sufficient.

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            ‒ By order of the President, the 14th and 20th Army Corps are to constitute the Army of Georgia, to be commanded by Major General Howard.

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            ‒ Wm. Lloyd Garrison, upon invitation from the Secretary of War, is going to take part in the flag-raising upon Fort Sumter. Senator Wilson and George Thompson, the English philanthropist, will also be present during the ceremony.

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            ‒ It is a noteworthy fact that just one year from the day when General Grant took command in person of the Army of the Potomac, at Culpepper Court House, our troops occupied Richmond.

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            ‒ Old Zach. Taylor passed judgement upon Jeff. Davis twenty years ago. – He called him “an unprincipled scoundrel and hypocritical adventurer.”

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The Election.

Owing to the excitement in regard to the fall of Richmond, we last week neglected to notice the result of the township elections. The regular Union ticket in Macomb township was elected and so far as we have learned, the Board will stand as last year. We gained the Supervisor in Walnut Grove township, but lost for Mound township. – A very light vote was polled.

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First National Bank.

Messrs. Charles Chandler & Co., will have in operation on next Monday, the 17th, their new national bank. See advertisement in another column.

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            → Butter is getting scarce again in town. Fetch it in.

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            → Dr. E. B. Hamill, a practical dentist, has permanently located in our city. He has opened an office in the room formerly occupied by Hawkins & Philpot, photographists.

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            → “Jimmy” Haley, the gentleman who is very intimate with our police magistrates, was elected Overseer of the Poor, in Emmet township, by our Democratic brethren. As Jimmy’s business is to male poor people, by selling, giving, or letting them steal poor whisky at his chebang, the selection, no doubt, is very suitable, and eminently fitting.

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            → H. Ervin, Esq., has something interesting to tax-payers in this week’s paper.

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            → We looked in vain over the columns of the last Eagle to find something in regard to the fall of Richmond, but “nary” word save a short article in regard to the illumination, and a poor effort at wit about the speeches made on the occasion. The editor says our office was “brilliantly illuminated with a loan tallow candle.” Either he had no friends from whom to borrow, or was not patriotic enough to light up, we know not which; suffice it to say they usually work at night in that office, and for fear it would be thought he was rejoicing over the victory, “his office, like his mind, was all darkness within.”

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            → Remember the sale of the County Lot next Monday. A very desirable piece of property.

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Good Templars.

The Good Templar lodges in this city seem to be in a flourishing condition as we hear of new members being initiated every night. Olive Branch Lodge, we are told, has initiated about twenty-five within the last quarter.

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Improvements.

We see quite a number of new houses being erected in different parts of the city, some of which will be quite a credit to the place, and others, we suppose are erected merely for the purpose renting, and – making money. There is no better investment at the present high wave of rent, and we hope many more will go up this season.

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At Johnson’s.

Luther Johnson, proprietor of the extensive dry goods store on the north side of the square, has returned from the East, where he was during the late panic, and is now opening by far the largest and most varied assortment of dry goods that was ever brought here. Having just purchased his goods, and at very low prices, Mr. Johnson will be enabled to sell goods at prices to suit customers. Everybody knows that Johnson sells cheap, and that he sells a vast quantity during the year. If you want to see a busy set of clerks, just take a peep into Johnson’s at almost any hour on a fair day, and you will be gratified. See his new full column advertisement.

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            → The old corner building, known as Campbell’s corner, is having a new front put on. When finished it will look “gay and festive.”

The store room two doors south of the Brown House has also been ornamented in the same way.

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            → “Knowledge is power,” is an old maxim and true, and such being the case, in order to derive knowledge, god books are necessary, and the place to buy them is at the establishment of S. J. Clarke & Co., on the north side of the square. All the latest publications of the day received as soon as issued, and all standard works always on hand. New styles of wall paper and window shades just received for the spring trade.

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Small Pox.

Dr. Blaisdell has some fresh vaccine virus, and is ready to accommodate all who may call at his office on the south side of the square.

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HOME KNIT SOCKS.

            A good stock to be found – and for sale at less than yarn prices – at the store of John Venable.

April 8, 1865

Macomb Eagle

‒ The representative pugilist of the United States, John C. Heenan, always struck from the left shoulder. – The representative of the military genius of the same country has also constantly employed a movement by the left hand instead of one by the right. England “went to the grass” 27 consecutive times before Heenan’s left, and was not whipped after all; the confederacy, under Grant’s left, has “kissed the rod” almost as many times and is not yet completely conquered. These facts speak volumes, not only of the value of these, left movements, but also of the astonishing endurance of England and the confederacy.

The contemplation of Grant’s long continued and innumerable movements by the left is of great interest. It shows how a thing may be always left, and yet just as unceasingly right. It further shows the astonishing fact that the more Grant was left the further he was in advance; and the equally puzzling circumstance that there is just as much a left ahead as a left behind.

Grant’s left has become famous. It is a new term in strategy and a new equivalent in war, whose symbol is success. It is a great thing, this left. In the beginning the rebels wanted nothing but to be left alone, and Grant has left them alone “severely.” He has left them without a confederacy or capital, they have no money left, no credit left, no niggers left, nothing left, in fact, save the privilege of inscribing upon their strongholds “left for parts unknown.” – Chicago Times.

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            ‒ It is to conservative men, an extremely gratifying as well as a significant fact, that, at the present moment, when the country has success within its grasp and glory written all over its standards, not one of the names of those who have produced these results is linked either in feeling or organization with the fanatical portion of the dominant political party. Grant, Sherman, Sheridan and Thomas are the men, not one of whom is a fanatic; not one of whom fought or ever struck a blow in this war simply for the purpose of giving freedom to the negro. Butler, Hooker, Banks, Burnside, and others of the kind, had no hand in the crowning triumph of our arms. The men who fought and won the battle are soldiers, and men who fought solely against armed rebellion, and never in the interests of God and humani- [fold]

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            There seems to be a general outbreak amongst the bust haters just now. The hyena Sumner, and others of his sect, assailed the memory of Chief Justice Taney on the recent occasion of a motion in the senate to make the usual appropriation to place the bust of that eminent gentleman and jurist in the supreme court room. About the same moment a member of the Tribune press of New York, having cowardly stolen in after our brave boys had taken possession of Charleston and cleaned out the rebels, incited an ignorant negro woman to throw down and break the bust of Calhoun. – Heaven had hitherto spared this memento of a distinguished citizen. – Bombs and shot and every invention of horrid war had failed to shake it from its pedestal. The lightening had passed it unscathed; our brave soldiers had respected its memories, not a ruthless hand removed it from its niche. It was reserved for one of the attachees of that same Tribune, which desired to tear down the stars and stripes, designating our national flag “a flaunting lie,” to cause that to be done which the cowardly wretch dared not do himself. This fellow said to a negro wench he met in the building:

‘That man was your great enemy – he did all he could to keep you slaves – you ought to break his bust.’

Thus incited the negress threw down the bust of John C. Calhoun and broke it in pieces.

We shall not be surprised if some fellow of the same kidney should prompt some other negress, for similar reasons, to demolish the statue of Washington because he was a slaveholder. Hunter did like desecration to the invaluable memories of Jefferson, because he penned the Declaration of Independence, and was a southerner.

Speaking of this monstrous barbarism to the bust of Calhoun, the New York News says: “John C. Calhoun was a statesman, a philosopher and a moralist. He was emphatically all these. He was a man of thought, all learning, of genius; and the sublime purity of his life would put to shame any of his traducers. As the reptile born of a cess-pool would perish if removed to a higher and purer atmosphere, so would the Tribune correspondent pine away if forced to breathe the moral atmosphere of Calhoun!

The detested rat might gnaw the corpse of a saint; the hyena might invade the tomb of a vestal virgin; but viler than a rat, and baser than hyena, this follower of John Brown incited the poor ignorant negress to break the bust of Calhoun.” – Springfield Register.

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Migration to Illinois.

            The Paris Mercury, Missouri, states that for the last few weeks many movers from the westward have passed through that place, with a great deal of valuable stock, and complains that the wealth of Missouri is leaving daily by hundreds and thousands of dollars. The same papers says: “A perfect host of horses, cattle, jacks, mules, sheep, hogs, etc., have passed through this place within the last few days, on their way to Illinois, accompanied by many well to do families and taxpayers.”

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            Female Rebel Soldiers. – Two female rebel soldiers were recently captured in Tennessee with a squad of 14 bridge burners, and are now in the Nashville military prison. Their names are Mary A. Wright, of Crosby’s scouts, and Margaret Henry, of Jenkin’s scouts. They are said to be dashing young creatures, and one of them rejoices in the rank of captain.

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A Curious Story – Lee Reported
to have been in Gen. Grant’s
Camp Talking with President
Lincoln.

            A communication which seems to confirm the rumors of a renewal of peace negotiations on the James was received to day by Mr. William H. Maichre of this city. His son, who is connected with one of the Maine regiments located in the immediate vicinity of Lieut. Gen. Grant’s headquarters, writing on the 25th, says: ‘The president is here to-night, and Gen. Lee is here too. They are trying to settle this thing up if they can, and I rather think they will succeed. I saw Lee myself. They brought him here blindfolded. He came to our headquarters accompanied by Lieut. Gen. Grant.’ If there be no mistake about this statement, it is, of course, a most important one. What greatly discredits it, however, is the fact that on the very day mentioned – last Saturday – the severe engagements on the two wings of the Grant’s army took place. – Syracuse Journal.

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            → We direct the attention of our readers to the card of Dr. E. B. Hamill. The doctor has lately located in this place for the purpose of practicing in the various branches of Dental surgeonory and Mechanical Dentistry. The Dr. is a No. 1 operator and all those who need work done in his line, can rest around that he can do it in the most perfect manner. He warrants all work. Give him a call.

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            Accident. – We learn that while some boys were jumping on Saturday or Sunday last, in Tennessee, that a boy went to take a pistol from a playmate when it went off and shot the boy in the hand and arm. The wound is not dangerous. We did not learn the names.

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            → Mr. Johnson, whose advertisement may be seen in another column, has just received a splendid stock of new spring and summer goods, at his popular house, near the northwest corner of the public square. – We have been through all the departments of his mammoth establishment; but we have not time to enumerate the hundredth past of what we saw. It is enough to say that his stock is complete – embracing every article usually sold in this market. He is a gentlemanly and obliging dealer, and will spare no pains to please.

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            → Mr. James H. Campbell, living south of this place, in Scotland township, has lost six head of cattle within the last few weeks, said to be from mad itch. The principal part of the were milch cows.

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            → Watkins & Co., have just received the largest and best stock of groceries, queensware, etc., ever brought to this place. They have lately moved into their new store, and are now prepared to furnish the community with everything usually kept in a grocery store. They are so gentlemanly and accommodating men to deal with and you may depend upon getting the best and the cheapest.

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            To the Public. – As there will, in all probability, be a large turn out of the people of the county, on Saturday next, we would most respectfully say to them that George Bailey, on the east side, will sell PRINTS AT TWELVE AND A HALF CENTS PER YARD. This is no HUMBUG, got up in order to deceive, but if you don’t believe it, go and see for yourselves.

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            → Mr. John Purdy and family left this county last Tuesday for Washington Territory. Mr. P. has been one of our most successful farmers, and will be missed in the community.

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            → James Cash has opened a dry goods store in Colchester. Jim is a clever fellow and we would advise all in need of anything in his line to give him a call as he will sell just as cheap as any body else.

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            → Mr. George Upp sold on Wednesday last, 35 head of as fat cattle as we have seen for sometime.

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            → The Journal says that we are trying to draw him into a “nonsensical controversy.” Judging from your “phiz” we would never expect to get anything but “nonsense” out of you.

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            → W. H. Monroe imbued with that peculiar American characteristic for improvement has just refitted his Barber shop in the Brown House in a net and tasty manner. A good Barber shop is an addition to any city. After the Hotel, it is almost the first resort for gentlemen entering a strange place, to have the dust and effects of a long journey removed. If the shop is conducted by a skillful hand and with cleanliness, it assists to give him a favorable impression of the place. That Monroe is skilled in all the ways of the tonsorial art, is an admitted fact; and that he can do a job to suit the most fastidious is well proven by the frequent remarks let fall by visitors to our city. All who wish to be “shaven and shorn” after the most approved manner will do well to give him a call.

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            → The Bushnell Press has something to say about us. We would answer it, but it is so “sharp” that we can’t. We advise friend Dave not to get so sharp again for if he does he will be cut into peg wood.

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The Illumination.

            The enthusiasm displayed in this city over the fall of Richmond, has never been surpassed. Nearly every house on the square was illuminated. Among the more conspicuous of them we may mention the Randolph and Browns Hotels. Our neighbor’s office was beautifully illuminated with a loan tallow candle, which soon gave out, and like his mind, all was darkness within. Not only was his office illuminated, but his face shown as though he had been looking “on the wine when it was red.”

In the square was a large transparency representing Lincoln’s entrance into Washington in 1861, and Jeff. Davis’ exit from Richmond in 1865. The one looked so much like the “tother” that we could not tell “tother” from which.

THE SPEECHES.

            The Rev. Mr. Rhea was the first speaker introduced. He said that he could now finish reading the passage of Scripture which he commenced when he left Missouri, to wit: “The wicked flee; when no man pursueth the righteous are as bold as a lion.” He felt happy to think that in this country a man could be a secessionist in the south, and a republican in the north. He blowed away for a while until the “touch-hole” gave out, and then subsided into obscurity. The next speaker was the Rev. Mr. Westfall. He was happy to be able to state to his friends, that, although Sue Mundy was hanged for treason, yet he had beat his loyal neighbors and got to heaven first. He rejoiced to know that on this occasion there was no distinction between Orthodox and Hetrodox.

April 7, 1865

Macomb Journal

GLORIOUS NEWS!

RICHMOND HAS FALLEN ! !

The Rebellion Played out!

How are You, Four Years’ Failure?

          We this week announce to our readers the most glorious news that has ever been our lot to record. Richmond has fallen! The rebel Capitol is ours, and the rebellion is about played out! Four years ago this month the news was sent over the wires that Fort Sumter was fired upon and captured, and the whole nation took upon themselves a solemn vow that the disgrace should be wiped out; that they would never lay [fold] –tors should acknowledge the supremacy of the laws, and that vow has been well kept, and we now begin to see the “beginning of the end.” Richmond is ours! The rebel army that has so well defended it for the last four years, has been utterly routed by the “greatest general in the world,” and loyal men rejoice.

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Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant.

            Four years ago Gen. Grant was unknown to the American people; to-day his name is upon the lips of every person in our beloved country; his praises and his virtues are spoken of by all, and he, to-day, stands a man among men, and the “greatest general in the world.

The course pursued by Gen. Grant since entering the military service, particularly since assuming the exclusive control of military affairs, can but meet the approval of the whole American people. He has gone on in the even tenor of his way, unmindful of the criticisms of the would-be military critics, doing that which he considered to be his duty, and leaving the results to the future.

Twelve months ago he assumed command of all our armies and the personal control of the Army of the Potomac. In a few short days he had re-organized the army and hurled his orders upon enemy, defeated them in one of the most desperate engagements of the war, and drove them in an almost utter rout to the defenses. Then his praises were sung, the fall of Richmond was daily predicted, and the overthrow of the rebellion was supposed to be at hand. But, when Gen. Grant quietly set down before the defenses of Richmond; when his army appeared to be lying idle long months; when Sherman, Sheridan, Thomas and others of his brave lieutenants were gaining victory upon victory over the enemy, then confidence began to be lost in Gen. Grant – he was not the man he was supposed to be after all, and some other General was to be sought after to command our armies, and already the eyes of the nation were looking towards Gen. Sherman as the coming man. – An annecdote is related in this connection which is worthy to be recorded upon every occasion. One of Gen. Sherman’s personal friends informed him that the country was losing confidence in Grant, and he would soon be called upon to take command of its armies. “Never,” cried Sherman, “Grant stood by me when I was crazy, I stood by him while he was drunk, and now we will both stand by each other.”

Grant paid no attention to what was said, and after Sherman, Sheridan and Thomas had almost destroyed the rebel armies in other places, he then “moved upon the enemies works” in force, and behold! Richmond is ours, and the rebel army under Lee is running in great haste to discover the last ditch. Grant triumphs and the country rejoices.

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            ‒ We have but few particulars as yet of the capture of the rebel capital, except the fighting of the day or two preceding the evacuation. Lee’s line of retreat is filled with stragglers and abandoned arms, artillery, etc. General Weitzel captured a large number of locomotives and cars in Richmond. – General Grant’s prisoners are estimated at from 15,000 to 18,000. It is believed that an engagement has taken place between our fleet in the James river and the Richmond ironclads, and that they burned and abandoned Fort Darling and all their other strong works on the James. Petersburg was occupied by our troops at about the same time that Richmond was taken possession of.

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ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.

From the 17th U. S. C. I.

Camp 17th U. S. C. I.,
Nashville, Tenn.,
March 21st, 1865.

            Editor Macomb Journal:

Thinking you would find room in your columns for a few lines from a reader of the Journal, I submit the following, hoping it may assist in doing away with that prejudice which gives rise to so much discord in our country.

On yesterday, the 20th, the colored citizens of this city had a celebration in honor of the ratification of the amended Constitution of this State, the programme of which was previously announced, and it was illustrated in bold relief yesterday in the streets, and I am free to say, without flattery, it was one of the few programmes which fall far short of the actual performance. – Indeed, the celebration for numbers, life, enthusiasm, good order, and good taste generally, was creditable in the highest degree to its managers and participants. Two excellent military brass bands led the different sections of the immense procession, and stirred the air with most excellent music.

The committee of arrangements had invited all colored people to suspend business for the day, and, judging from appearances, I think the invitation was promptly complied with, for they swarmed in from all quarters in squads, companies, troops, regiments and brigades, till the very earth seemed to shake with their tread.

The various societies marched in the following order:

Music. The colored troops, mostly from the 17th U. S. C. I. The barber’s association. The Sons of Liberty. – State Equal rights League, together with a large number of children, of all sexes and sizes, attending at the different colored schools, and also a procession of men and women on foot, and in very handsome carriages, and hacks – many of the latter were brilliantly decorated with flags, which also festooned the heads of the horses. The Marshals were gaily decked out with sashes, and deserve great praise for the excellent order and decorum of the procession, which I have never seen surpassed. – The number present in the procession must have exceeded five thousand, very many of whom were dressed in very costly and fashionable apparel.

I did not hear the oration, but judg- [fold] er, it must have been a good one.

I could but ask myself the question while gazing upon the procession, what right have we to deprive them of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness?

After being connected with the colored organization, in the army, for over fifteen months, forced to study their disposition, and curious to know their intellectual abilities, I feel that I ought to be prepared to judge something of their nature and abilities when proper- trained and cultivated.

The question as to their humanity has long since been given up, as well as their right to liberty, and now the question naturally arises, are they fit subjects to become citizens in every sense of the word? Most assuredly they are. “What,” one is ready to exclaim, “allow them to vote, to hold office?” Yes, allow them all the privileges of a citizen if you make citizens of them, which is already done. They are just as capable now while in ignorance, as thousands of whites, who vote for party whisky and not for the man or principles. If we deprive them on account of ignorance, why not deprive others for the same cause?

We have received, and are now receiving, a severe scourge, as a nation, for past grievances inflicted upon the blacks. Now, in the name of Heaven, let us finish the war so we may never be visited with Heaven’s rebuke again for inhumanity towards the colored portion of our citizens.

J. C. M.

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From the 16th Regiment.

            The following is a list of the casualties in the 16th Ill. Inft., in the late battles in North Carolina:

Killed.

            Co. A. – Serg’t George Hainline, Private John Cook, Private Charles Merrick.

Co. C. – Private Samuel Shaw, Jas. McClintock.

Co. H. – Private Samuel G. Metcalf, L. J. Hammond.

Co. K. – Private Fred. Arnold, Thos. Duffield, Philo C. White.

Wounded.

            Co. A. – Sergt. S. L. Hainline. Corporal K. H. Speak, Privates Wm. Overstreet, Cyrus Lane, (wounded and captured,) Chas. Waters, (wounded and captured,) J. F. Hendrick, George Wheeler.

Co. B. – Sergt. Chas. McKinnley, Private Chas. H. Bingham, Alfred Henry, James Parr, Benjamin Plynate, A. L. Weid, Jas. I. Dillon, (wounded and captured,) S. Ritchey.

Co. C. – Privates Daniel Brundage, E D Glasscock, Patrick Cooney, Patrick Miles.

Co. D. – Sergt. James Welch, Serg’t John Welch, Corporal Gordon Kimball, Private Leo Brooks.

Co. E. – Serg’t Gibbson, Private R Daniel, Private John L Beck, Private W. F. Brown.

Co. F. – Lieut. Henry Watson, Serg’t A. Lacroft, Private John Murphy.

Co. H. – Privates P. Hintz, Lewellen Stephens.

Co. I. – Serg’t Henry Hovey, Serg’t W. Huggins, Privates E. D. Hubbard, W K Persey.

Co. K. – Lieut. Daniel Glassner, Private Alex Drew.

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Rainy.

Last Monday, the 3d inst., was another rainy day. It made, if we are not mistaken the fifth Monday that we have had rain. – Have we a prophet among us? If so, will he please inform us when we will have a dry Monday? Our merchants say there is no profit, so we guess we will have to wait the pleasure of the clerk of the weather.

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Calico has Fallen!

Richmond is “took.” Petersburg is ours. Jeff. Davis is a fugitive upon the face the earth, and George W. Bailey, on the east side of the square, is selling good prints at 12 1-2 cents per yard, sheetings at 25 cents, and other goods in proportion.

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RICHMOND HAS FALLEN!

How the News was Received in Macomb.

            At train time on Monday evening our city was as quiet as usual, if not quieter, the rain during the day having the effect to dampen the spirits of the most exuberant, and no one having an idea that the whole North was in an uproar of furious delight. There were but few people on the square at dark, but on the arrival of the Quincy Daily Whig, containing the announcement of the fall of Richmond, cheers, long and loud, were sent up by the few who were there. Soon the people from all parts of the city flocked to the square. “Richmond has fallen!” “Richmond is ours!” were the words that greeted them on all sides. A bonfire was soon kindled on the north side of the square, several buildings were illuminated, and Young America with tin horns, cow bells, empty oyster cans, drums, &c., made such a din, as only Young America can make. Joy sat on every countenance. – “Fair women and brave men” thronged the sidewalks. Shouts, cheers, shaking of hands and hugging were the order of the night till a late hour.

By a general agreement, a grand “blow-out” was set for the next evening. Accordingly, on Tuesday evening, at dusk, the business houses and hotels fronting on the square were brilliantly illuminated, the fife and drum were brought into requisition, our citizens came out in their strength, every one seemed to be pervaded with the spirit of the hour, bonfires were kindled, sky rockets, Roman candles and other fireworks were burnt in the square, and the boys – those ubiquitous specimens of Young America – were out in full force, and “went in” for a good time generally. Speeches were made by Revs. Rhea and Westfall, and several patriotic songs were sung by the Glee Club.

We have not the time nor the space to give in detail all the noticable features of the occasion – suffice is to say, it was the best demonstration ever gotten up in Macomb, and can only be exceeded by one thing – that is, peace.

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            → A lot of new novels just received at Clarke’s Bookstore.

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Liberality.

It is an established axiom that those dealers who patronize printers liberally are the ones who are liberal to their customers. According to this, (and we know it to be true,) Chambers & Randolph, at the Chicago Store, on the east side of the square, are among the most liberal. Their stock of dry goods is complete, and they sell as cheap as the cheapest. See double column ad.

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Power.

Mine is the power to wake the gaze, yielding the spirit’s speechless praise; mine is the spell that flings control over the eye, breast, brain and soul; and Hawkins & Philpot are the equals of any photographers in the West. Their new gallery is fitted up magnificently, and it is a treat to go through their rooms. Gallery southeast corner of the square, over Watkins & Co’s grocery store.

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            → All the new publications of the day received as soon as issued at Clarke’s bookstore.

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Returned.

Messrs. Johnsons and J. M. Browne have returned home from the east, where they have been making extensive purchases of goods in their respective lines. They’ll “wake snakes” in a few days, due notice of which will be given through the columns of the Journal.

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            → See Johnson’s new advertisement, and then go see his new goods.

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That’s it.

The extensive grocery establishment of Watkins & Co., on the southeast corner of the square, is undoubtedly the place to go to for cheap and pure articles in the grocery line. Try them.

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            → John Venable is out with a new advertisement, announcing that he is in “for the wool trade of 1865.”

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            → Knappers & Cyrus, at the “old corner,” inform the people through our columns, that they are selling groceries at panic prices.

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“The world’s for sale hang out the sign,
Call every traveler to me,”

And let him go to Geo. W. Bailey’s, on the east side of the square, where the cheapest assortment of dry goods can be found. – George deals on the “square” in more than one sense, and gives good bargains.

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            → An exchange indulges in the following sagacious reflections: “No man can afford to give up advertising unless he gives up business; and he who wishes to sell to the intelligent, reading, permanent people of a city, must notify them through their favorite newspaper where their needs can be supplied. – The harder and duller the times the greater the needs of stimulus through advertising.”

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            → Photographs of Gens. Grant, Sherman, Sheridan and Lincoln for sale at Clarke’s Bookstore. Price 15 cents.

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            → Now that Richmond has fallen, all acknowledge, with Gen. Scott, that Gen. Grant is the greatest general now living, and all acknowledge that Clark’s Bookstore is the place to buy books, stationery, wall paper, window shades, photographic albums, or anything usually kept in a well regulated bookstore. Messrs. Clarke & Co. are never undersold by any one, whether their goods were brought at panic prices or not. – Give them a call.

April 1, 1865

Macomb Eagle

A Word to the Democracy of McDonough County.

            We are now approaching an election which, though local, is of great importance to the people of this county. We therefore cannot too strongly urge Democrats to attend promptly at the polls on next Tuesday, and vote for the Democratic nominees for township officers. We now have a majority in the board of Supervisors, and by all that is sacred and fair, let us keep them there to guard the interests of McDonough county against republican misrule. Let the Democrats turn out en masse, remembering that their duty to their country is no less sacred than their duty to their families, and only subordinate to their duty to God. We are not of the number who despair of ultimate success. “Truth crushed to earth will rise again.” So it shall be with Democratic principles which are embodied in the constitution and shadowed forth in the lives of Washington, Jefferson, and Jackson. A return to reason and sound policy will, in time, enable us to hurl from power the usurpers of law. We must breast the storm of revolution which is fast substituting the diction of one man for our chartered liberties, and the caprice of an autocrat, for the most sacred and long cherished principles of law. This can only be done by attending promptly to every election, and exercising the elective franchise, at all hazards and at any cost. The interests of our country, as well as the interest of the State and nation and must be guarded with vigilant eyes. We hope none will forget the recent action of the republican members of the board of supervisors, in regard to bounty tax. They fought that measure with a desperate energy, worthy of a better cause, and heaped words of obloquy on the Irish and Scotch, who were denominated foreign jail-birds – a disgrace to our army, by at least some of their coadjutors. We now ask the Irishman and Scotchman, who is saved from draft by his bounty order, if he can vote, without compunctions of conscience, for such men. – Men who would gladly see them torn from their families, and behold their fields grow up in weeds, rather than be taxed a few dollars for the common weal. These are the class of abandoned bipeds who would gladly prosecute the war on booty obtained by vandalism, but who draw back in holy horror from contributing one dollar of their own money. “Oh, consistency, what a jewel thou art!”

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       → Democrats, don’t forget the election.

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Bounty or No Bounty.

            Next Tuesday the people of this county are to determine whether or not, the law authorizing a tax for bounties to drafted or enlisted men shall continue a law. On this question we think the corporation of Macomb should be silent, as it is exempt from the tax and has assumed to take care of herself, she has no just right to dictate to the rest of the county in this matter, and we hope she will leave this question to be settled by those who are personally and pecuniarily interested. All appropriations made by the board prior to next Tuesday are valid and binding and not to be affected in any manner by the vote. – The real question for the people to decided is, shall the provisions of the law be continued so as to provide for future contagencies. If, in the future, appropriations should be deemed inexpedient, the board would doubtless refrain from making them; but it might become necessary in the future as it has in the past. We are therefore in favor of continuing the law, leaving the matter with the board of supervisors to be acted upon as contagencies and the interest of the people require. In case of another call it will be an easy matter for the people to inform their representatives, whether they would rather be drafted or taxed.

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            → We are glad to notice that a healthy competition is springing up in our town, among our business men; it speaks well for our place, and obviates the necessity of going elsewhere to purchase goods. Good groceries, dry goods, hardware, and in fact every article of merchandise, can now be purchased in Macomb as advantageously as at any place in this or adjoining counties.

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Vote early.

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NEW GOODS

Just received at the

CHICAGO STORE.

Consisting of

        Dress Goods,
Shawls and Mantellas,
Bleached Shirtings,
Brown Sheetings,
Woolen Goods,
Yankee Notions,
White Goods,
Embroideries,
Hosiery,
Gents Furnishing Goods,
Millinery Goods,
Hats and Caps,
Ladies and Misses Shoes,

        All of which has just been purchased at greatly reduced prices, and will be sold at the

Lowest Market Price.

CHAMBERS & RANDOLPH.

East side of the Square.

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NEW YORK

CLOTHING STORE!

Where will be found a complete stock of Spring
and Summer

CLOTHING

of all grades, from the Finest down to the Medium and Low Price Goods.

FINE CASSIMERE SUITS,

Walking and Sack Coats.

A Fine Stock of Black Clothing.

GENTS FURNISHING GOODS

of all kinds.

HATS AND CAPS

of good quality.

Carpet Bags, Umbrellas, etc., etc.

            Having bought all my goods in New York, under the recent great decline in gold, and having made my purchases at

VERY LOW PRICES.

            I am in a position to supply customers upon the most favorable terms. I buy for cash, sell for cash, and at a very small profit, and can and will please you in quality, Making, Trimming, Fit, and prices. My goods are all new and bought to sell. And if there is a further decline in Gold, down goes the prices of my goods.

DON’T FORGET THE PLACE.

No. 4. NORTH SIDE OF THE PUBLIC SQUARE.

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            → Robert Ransom and others indicted for riot at Colchester, were found guilty and fined each in the sum of $25 and costs. – Dodds obtained a new trials, and the States attorney entered a nolle prosequi.

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            Still They Go. – We have noticed for the last two weeks a general rush of people to the southeast corner of the square, and on inquiring the cause, we were informed that they were going to the splendid photograph gallery of Hawkins & Philpot. These gentlemen are prepared to take all kinds of pictures in the very best style.

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            → The largest stock of Pocket Books in the city is at Clarke’s Bookstore.

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            → Mary Long, indicted for concealing the death of a bastard child, found a few weeks ago at Middletown, was acquitted by the jury.

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            → Indictments have been preferred by the grand jury against Miles, John and Jas. Bond and Attilla Ray, for the murder of W. H. Randolph.

 ——————–

            The Great Flood. – There has been a tremendous flood in the east, and property to the amount of $6,000,000 was destroyed. – Towns, cities, and villages, were completely submerged, yet, notwithstanding the flood, I. August, of the popular clothing house, has just received the largest stock of clothing ever brought to this place, which he proposes to sell as cheap as the cheapest.

 ——————–

            Beyond a Doubt. – It is now known beyond a doubt, that S. J. Hopper, on the north side of the square, is selling better clothing, and for less money, than any other house in the city. He also has a large stock of hats and caps, valises, &c., which he sells at greatly reduced prices.

 ——————

            Boots and Shoes. – Mr. Ray has just returned from the East with a new stock of boots, shoes, gaiters, &c., for the spring trade, Mr. R. brags on the superiority of his stock, and while he makes now swell over selling at “panic prices,” and all that sort of stuff, he defies anybody to undersell him, taking into consideration the quality of the article.

 ——————-

            → Now is the time to commence the work of ornamenting our cout house yard. Let there be quite a number of young, thrifty maple trees set out. There will be much better than the old locusts; and we hope after the trees and shrubbery shall have been set out, that care will be taken of them by not allowing the yard to be used as a pasture for the stock of a few of the favored ones. Will the city council make an appropriation for this purpose?

 ——————

            Small Pox. – We are informed that there has been several cases of small pox at and near Blandinsville, of which disease Mrs. Lieut. J. Oneal has lately died, and the rest of her father’s family (Wm. Metcalf) are still afflicted.

 ——————–

            The Enrollment. – Since we published some strictures on those engaged in enrolling this county, we are assured by Mr. Davis that he acted strictly in compliance with his written instructions, having received the same on the 28th of December and being required to furnish corrected lists of enrollment on the 31st of December, which certainly was too short a time to accomplish any thing satisfactorily. But, if the disease is not in the lower parts it must be in the head.

 ——————–

            → We learn that Mr. Cowgill’s boy was blown from the top of a freight car, standing on the switch at Bushnell, on Friday last, and badly hurt.

 ——————–

            → On Wednesday night last, the eating saloon of John Jacobs was entered by some unknown persons, who destroyed and injured nearly everything in the house. Where is our police?

 ——————–

            ‒ Be at the polls early.

 ——————-

            Cheaper than Eyes. – The place to buy prints, delains, denims, brown and bleached muslins, tickings, striped and checked shirting, cotton flannels, ginghams, cloths, cassimeres, boots and shoes, groceries, and everything else cheap, is at N. P. Tinsley’s. He has a large and well selected stock on hand, and is bound not to be undersold by any other store in the city. He defies competition, and will give more for a few greenbacks than can be hauled off in a “four-hoss” cart. If you don’t believe us, go and see for yourself.

 ——————–

            Clothes Stealing. – On Monday night last the clothes thief visited the premises of Mr. Abbott and abstracted two calico dresses that had been hung out to dry. A lot of children’s clothing on the same line was not taken. The dresses were dark colored and pretty well worn. The clothes thief is a very mean individual, but to steal from an ex-editor is the climax of meanness.

March 31, 1865

Macomb Journal
March 31, 1865

As the weeks go by, the aspect in the military sky grows brighter and brighter for the Union cause. The plans of Gen. Grant, as they develop themselves, show stupendous and grand, and will, ere long, prove that he is the right man in the right place. He has got a death gripe on the foul throat of the rebellion, nor will he let go his hold until the monster is effectually throttled. Let us be of good cheer – “all is well.”

——————–

 

Retribution. – A correspondent with Sherman’s army says – “Some of our men, escorted by niggers and prisoners, paid a visit to a noted ruffian, a second Legree, who kept a pack of bloodhounds for the purpose of hunting down niggers and escaped Union prisoners. The boys disposed of the dogs as they have done with all the bloodhounds they came across, burned down his house and place, and tied himself to a tree and got some strapping niggers to flog him, which they did with a will, repaying in the les talionis style.”

——————–

 

ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.

From the 11th Ill. Cavalry.

Camp Co. “I,” 11th Ill. V. V. Cav.,
Memphis, Tenn.,
March 13, 1865.

            Editor Macomb Journal:

I wish to say through the columns of your paper to the ladies of Blandinville and vicinity that to-day, (13th,) Co. I, 11th Ill. Cav, (myself a member of the same) were made the happy recipients of two barrels of dried apples, for which we feel ever grateful. This is the second time that you have favored us with your benevolent contributions. We know not whom you are, but this matters not. Suffice to say, you have our most sincere and grateful thanks for your noble efforts to relieve the hungry veterans of Uncle Sam’s indefatigable army; and when the war-worn veterans of five years’ service shall have returned to their peaceful homes, and white-robed peace shall have again visited our once happy land, we hope to find you the same kind-hearted, loving young ladies you were before war’s clamorous soundings were heard to resound through the land. It is said that it is more blessed to give than to receive. If this be true, you have been doubly blest in this generous act, for I am certain that never before were men more blest in receiving. To use a common term among soldiers, we have been fed so long on hard-tack and “sowbelly” (excuse me) that we are truly glad to receive something we can relish more.

And now, ladies, as the last vestige of hope of success for the rebel cause is being obliterated, and the cause of freedom and the right assumes a brighter aspect, and the noble hearts of the sons of liberty begin to swell with glowing emotions of success and the speedy terminus of the war, cannot you find room in your hearts to welcome the war-worn veterans of many a hard fought battle to your peaceful and tranquil homes.

Fleming H. Freeland.

——————–

 

Sherman’s Operations.

            The N. Y. Tribune’s Goldsboro special of the 22d gives the following account of Sherman’s and Schofields’s movements: “Gen. Cox advanced from Kinston towards Goldsboro on Sunday morning. The remainder of the corps followed on Monday morning. The enemy had already fallen back, leaving the road clear, but destroying bridges and culverts. A body of the enemy’s cavalry attacked our advance on Sunday. Communication was opened with Gen. Sherman, and Gen. Schofield sent Capt. Twining with an escort, who succeeded in reaching his headquarters. Meantime Gen. Sherman’s scouts arrived at Gen. Schofield’s headquarters, bringing word that his advance was within fifteen miles of Smithfield. Sherman had encountered but slight opposition, Hampton’s and Wheeler’s cavalry occasionally coming to try and attempt to check his advance. Sunday afternoon the enemy made a stand about fifteen miles southeast of Smithfield, where a line of strongly intrenched field works had been thrown up, and with batteries in position opened upon Gen. Sherman’s center. The 20th corps, forming the center, were first engaged. The 14th corps, constituting the right, and the 17th the left, were advanced, and a brisk engagement followed in which our own and the rebel army was heavily engaged. Our loss was not heavy. In the meantime General Schofield pushed forward rapidly. The advance of General Sherman on the enemy’s right in the direction of Smithfield and Raleigh, made it necessary for the enemy to fall rapidly back to cover those points. – Schofield continued to press them thro’ out Monday, and on Tuesday the enemy entered Goldsboro.

Tuesday, Sherman advanced again, and skirmished with the rebel rear guard, until reaching Bentonville, where the enemy had intrenched on the opposite side of Mill Creek. The 20th Corps was first engaged, and at noon, a sharp battle was progressing along the whole line, the cavalry of Kilpatrick being actively occupied upon the left flank, the 20th Corps suffered a temporary check, but the 14th Corps coming up in good time, held the ground. The 17th Corps was advanced to the support of the 14th and 20th, and succeeding in turning the enemy’s right, completely compelled him to give way. The enemy then fell back, abandoning his works, and passing through Smithfield, retired towards Raleigh. Sherman followed up the retreating rebel army, and entered Smithfield without further opposition.

——————–

 

Celebration at Fort Sumter.

            The President has ordered Brevet Major General Anderson to raise over Fort Sumter, at noon on the 14th of April, the same United States flag that floated over it at the time of the rebel assault, and that it be saluted with one hundred guns from Sumter, and from every fort and rebel battery that fired upon Sumter: also that suitable military ceremonies be performed under the direction of Major General W. T. Sherman whose operations compelled the evacuation of Charleston or, in his absence, by General Gilmore, and also, that the navel forces at Charleston be directed to participate in the ceremonies. Rev. Henry Ward Beecher will be invited to deliver an address on the occasion.

——————–

 

Circuit Court.

The March term of the Circuit Court adjourned on last Saturday evening, after a session of just one week. A good amount of business was done during the time, but no trials of importance took place, with the exception of the trial of the young woman , spoken of last week, indicted for infanticide, and some coal miners from Colchester, indicted for riot. The woman was acquitted, and the coal miners were adjudged guilty by the jury, but the Judge set aside the verdict as regarded one of them, and the others, five in number, were fined twenty-five dollars each.

——————–

 

Tickets.

We are prepared to print election Tickets for the different townships as cheap as ever. Bring them along.

——————-

 

Cotton in McDonough.

Mr. George Meadows, of Industry township, in this county, has left with us a sample of cotton, raised by his father, Jesse Meadows, Esq., in that township. This cotton is as fine as any upland cotton that is raised in Dixie. Mr. Meadows says his father raised nearly an acre, and that the yield was very heavy. The labor to produce this was not more than is required by the common cereals of our country. The curious can see the sample left with us by calling at this office.

——————–

Real Estate Sales.

B. R. Hampton, Esq., has sold his farm, situated 3 ½ miles northeast from this city, for $11,500. Mr. Wm. Runkle was the purchaser. Mr. Hampton is going to remove to Abingdon, Knox county.

J. W. Nichols, G. W. C. T. of the order of Good Templars, of this State, has sold his residence in this city to Mr. David Scott, for $1000. Mr. Nichols goes to Aurora, in this State, to reside.

 ——————–

Attention! Voters.

There will be a mass meeting of the Union voters of Macomb township held in the City Council room, over Jordan’s bank, on to-morrow, Saturday, at 2 o’clock, P. M., for the purpose of putting in nomination candidates for the various offices to be filled at the ensuing town meeting next Tuesday. Let there be a full turn out.

 ——————–

Firm Change.

Mr. James Wood, of the firm of Ragan & Wood, photographers on the northwest corner of the square, has sold his interest in the picture business to Mr. W. B. Thompson, of this city. The new firm are having a heavy run of custom, and are doing nice work.

 —————–

Job Work.

We are prepared to execute horse and jack bills on short notice at this office.

 ——————–

Nix cumarous.

A certain “publisher” of a paper not a thousand miles from here, with more impudence than brains, wishes to draw us into a nonsensical controversy with him. We will not gratify him – we have better use for our columns.

 ——————–

            → Coal has been selling in this city, for the last few weeks, at prices ranging from 25cts to 40cts per bushel. Pretty steep for this country, when we have such an inexhaustible quantity all around us.

 ——————–

Down Go the Prices.

As gold goes down, so do the prices of goods of all kinds, and Watkins & Co., acting on the principle that if it is fair to mark up goods when gold goes up, it is equally right and just to mark them down when gold falls. Go and inquire their new tariff of prices. Store in their new brick, opposite Randolph house.

 ———————

            → As Spring advances, and the roads become passable, so that hauling can be done to advantage, it would be well for those who contemplate building this season to give H. R. Bartleson a call at his lumber yard, southeast corner of the square. Plenty of lumber of the best quality to be found there at all times.

 ——————–

Gone East.

J. M. Browne, the very popular boot and shoe man on the south side of the square, has gone east to replenish his stock of boots, shoes, hats and caps, and as soon as they arrive, he will open – not only his goods – but the eyes of old fogies in regard to high prices.

 ———————

            → The Sheriff of Fulton county bro’t to our city, on Tuesday of last week, a man to be tried here for the larceny of a sett of harness, &c. The man was placed in charge of one of the bailiffs in attendance at court, who, by some means, let the thief escape – verdict by the post office jury, “Nobody to blame.”

 ——————–

            → A busy “community” – the physicians of this city.

 ——————–

In Their New Rooms.

            Messrs. Hawkins & Philpot, the popular photographers of this city, have moved into their new and spacious rooms over Watkins & Co’s grocery store, and are prepared to take pictures of any desired style or size known to the art. Their rooms are perfect models of neatness, order and beauty. A visit to their rooms will repay any one for his trouble.

 ——————–

            → From private letters to his wife, we learn that Mr. Magie is at Charleston, S. C. He was suffering from a severe attack of the rheumatism. – George Hall and Frank Smith, of this city, were with him, and were well.

 ——————–

            → All the new publications of the day received as soon as issued at Clarke’s bookstore.

 ——————–

            → All kinds of window shades and fixtures at Clarke’s bookstore.

 ——————–

            → The Board of Supervisors have commissioned John Knappenberger, Esq., to sell the lot on the northwest corner of the square, generally known as the county lot. See advertisement in another column.

 ——————-

Attention,

Ye Hungry!

            The attention of the HUNGRY, who visit this City on business or pleasure, is directed to G. K. HALL & CO’S

RESTAURANT

East Side of the Square. Everything in the eating line, such as Fresh and Cove OYSTERS, Beefsteak, Hot Coffee, Game, &c, &c., served up in the best style and at all business hours. Also, for sale, Confectionery of all kinds, Sweetmeats, Oysters by the Can, Jellies, Pies, Cakes, &c., &c.

Parties supplied with Ice-cream, Cakes, and Pies, on short notice.

 ——————–

H A V E N S

GROCERY

            Wants 5,000 pounds Dried Apples. Highest market price in CASH will be paid.

Haven’s is the place to get Groceries cheap. Give him a call.

1 pound of Good Tea,                                                $1.50

4 pounds of Good Sugar,                                           1.00

And Good Coffee, 45 cents per pound.

All other Goods in proportion. CASH FOR

B U T T E R

AND

EGGS!

            Do not forget the place, SOUTH SIDE OF THE SQUARE, next door to Cottrell & Bros.

March 25, 1865

Macomb Eagle

→ Mr. Lincoln’s great Chicago conspiracy case is turning out worse and worse. Judge Drummond, of the U. S. Circuit Court, and a good republican too, testified before the Commission last week that he was well acquainted with B. S. Morris and Charles Welsh, the chief alleged conspirators, and believed them as loyal as himself. Lincoln should therefore either discharge Morris and Walsh or arrest Judge Drummond. The fact is the whole affair has turned out to be a miserable electioneering scheme. Oh, Abraham!

 ——————–

The Inaugural Humiliation.

            Andrew Johnson, the Vice President elect, presented himself drunk at the great inaugural ceremony, in the presence of the assembled executive and judicial departments of the Government, the Representatives of the people, the Senate over which he is to preside, a large concourse of citizens from all parts of the country, and of the foreign diplomats and visitors. Before that imposing concourse he bellowed for half an hour the idiotic babble of a mind besotted by a fortnight’s debauch. He boasted himself as a specimen of the working of American institutions, which brought such a man as he to the second place in the Government. He dragged its proudest ceremony in the slough of his degradation, and turned it to shame and mortification.

This cannot be covered up as a private infirmity. It was exhibited before the world. We have to discuss it as a public calamity, and as a national insult and disgrace which demands relief. – Cincinnati Gazette, [Republican.]

We join he Gazette in condemning the Vice President for the unseemly state in which he presented himself at the inauguration. We were an eyewitness to the drunken exhibition, and shared the shame and mortification felt by all present, that one so highly hon- [fold in page] threshold of his official duties, prove so unworthy and unfit to discharge them. – Chicago Journal, [Republican.]

That Andrew Johnson, Vice President of the United States, was drunk, when inaugurated, and outraged, in a frightful manner, all the proprieties of the occasion, is a notorious fact. – Cincinnati Commercial [Republican.]

Surely it cannot be doubted that the Vice President was drunk, after this array of testimony of his own political friends against him. What can we expect of a party that elects such notorious apostates to morals and principles to the high offices of the nation as Vice President Johnson, and Senators Yates, Chandler and Lane, saying nothing nothing about Long John Wentworth and the smaller fry who steep themselves in whisky. Verily, this modern party contains all the “christianity,” “decency,” and “morality,” of the country.

 ——————–

THE SPIRITS IN PRISON

Mysterious Jail Manifestations In Princeton, Illinois.

From the Princeton (Ill.) Republican.

Last week we gave an account of some wonderful manifestations in the Bureau county jail, and promised an early expose of the modus operandi by which they were produced. The shaking of the jail, which was a very powerful “manifestation,” was done by means of a very small amount of force applied to one of the plates of boiler iron with which the floors of the cells are lined. The plate to which the force is applied is slightly sprung, and a small amount of force will move it, and by taking advantage of some vibrations it can be moved a little more each time until the noise and jarring becomes very heavy. The cells most distant from the one where the operator performs his “spirit orders” shake and rattle the most. It is [?] wonderful that a man with one foot can move all the cells in the huge building, as well as make all the windows rattle and the grates jump upon the kitchen stove. And he will do this right while he is being watched, and while his hands are being held, without any perceptible effort. The moving of the sticks about the cells was done by means of fine threads which are invisible at a short distance, leading to other cells. The rappings were caused by means of threads attached to a ring.

These manifestations were truly wonderful and for two or three week baffled all attempts on the part of Sheriff Loverin and Deputy Nash to discover how they were produced. – Had they, like the Spiritualists, preferred to attribute the mystery to superhuman agency, instead of determining to look for a rational human cause, they might have been instrumental in helping to get up an excitement that would have startled the “spirit world,” and made the Bureau county jail the Mecca to which the deluded Spiritualists of the whole country would have flocked for obtaining revelations from the Almighty!

Some of the Spiritualists may feel inclined to censure the Sheriff for having allowed them to witness their mysteries and to make fools of themselves about them; but we can see nothing censurable in his conduct. He told them that they were at liberty to investigate them, and if they attributed them to superhuman agency and got “sold out,” it was not his fault. We believe that the course he took will do more towards shaking the faith of the Spiritualists in this delusion of pretended revelations from the spirit world than anything that has ever been done in this community.

The boys who performed the wonders certainly played a sharp game, and have had a splendid opportunity to laugh at the credulity of many deluded victims.

 ——————–

            → Lieutenants, Hovey and Morse have been exchanged and are now at home. Neither of them look as though they had been starved to death.

 ——————–

            Great Oil Excitement. – Some fortunate individual has struck oil a short distance from Aledo, in Mercer county, which has caused great excitement, and almost every man in that county has “oil on the brain.” Colossal fortunes are looming up before the visions of the property owners, and they expect to coin money like dirt.

Notwithstanding the oil excitement, Mr. S. J. Hopper, at the New York clothing store, has filled his shelves with the largest and finest stock of spring and summer clothing, even before offered to the public, suitable for plain old gentlemen, starchy old bachelors, and nice, fashionable young men, and warranted to fit just as neat and trim as though you had been melted and poured into them. He sells just as cheap as any man, and to prove it he invites all to come and see.

 ——————–

            → The editor of the Journal, has come out right square in favor of the right of secession. He urges the board of supervisors to nullify the acts of the Legislature. We direct the attention of the provost marshall to this blatant traitor.

 ——————–

Teachers’ Examination.

            I shall hold examinations as follows:

Macomb, 3d ward school house, March 27th.
Bushnell, March 30th.
Tennessee, April 1st.
Industry, April 6th.
Blandinville, April 8th.

Exercise will commence each day at 10 o’clock A. M. Applicatns for certificates will please take notice.

John Barge,
County Superintendent.

 ——————–

            New Spring Goods. – Wm. Wetherhold on the east side, has returned with the handsomest assortment of fresh spring goods he has yet offered to the public. The ladies, in particular, will be pleased with his selections, for they embrace all the late styles of dress goods, and of the most beautiful and fashionable patterns. As to prices, he is determined not to be undersold in the city, and his stock will always be kept full and complete. His old customers, and all others looking for cheap and fashionable goods, are invited to call and give him a trial.

 ——————–

            → A disease called the spotted fever has been raging here for sometime past. The latest cases, we believe, are those of Mr. Wadham’s daughter, and Mr. John Herron’s two children, all of which have died.

 ——————

            Monster Spring Arrival. – I. August is always up to time in the clothing trade, and never calculates on being undersold. He is now receiving a monster stock of spring and summer clothing, among which will be found all the late styles and fashions. It would be useless to undertake to minutely describe his stock. Suffice it to say, it embraces the most fashionable patterns to be found in the city. He warrants a bargain to every one who favors him with their patronage. In looking for cheap goods, go to the clothing store of I. August.

 ——————–

            → The citizens of Bushnell, we are informed, intend to devote the $50,000 raised to keep their seats out of mud.

 ——————–

            → Chambers & Randolph have just received a large invoice of spring & summer goods, which they are offering at panic prices. They will sell you cheaper and better goods than any other house in this place.

 ——————–

            → Rain and mud has been the order of the day for the last two weeks, but notwithstanding S. J. Clarke & Co., are in receipt of the largest stock of Wall and Window Paper ever brought to this city, which they are determined to sell at the ruling market price, let it be high or low, and they cannot and will not be under sold by any one. Give them a call.

 ——————–

            → Wm. Green, a soldier from this county, is at home on a short furlough.

 ——————-

            → We will endeavor, next week, to state why we oppose the measure [the Bounty Tax]. – Journal.

We think that it will only be an “endeavor.”

 ——————–

            → Lieut. Joe. Waters has “bored” Mr. Rollins with a long letter of slang about the bounty tax, and Mr. R. not wishing to be the only sufferer has had it published in the Journal. Well Joe, you should not be so hard next time for we all feel “awful” bad about it.

 ——————–

            → Capt. Higgins of the 84th Regiment has resigned and is now at home. He contemplates locating in this place again.

 ——————–

            Correction. – In the notice of Mrs. Mathewson’s school last week, we said it would commence on the 1st Monday in May, it should have been the 1st Monday in April. Those interested will govern themselves accordingly.

 ——————–

            → Some of our readers having inquired of us about the genuineness of Old Abe’s inaugural address; we desire to set the matter at rest, by stating that the copy we published two weeks ago, was the inaugural. It is probably a burlesque on such addresses generally, but was not so intended by its author. It is simply Old Abe’s “Last Joke,” at the expense of the American people.

 ——————–

            Circuit Court. – This court commenced on Monday last. Judging from the admirable manner in which Judge Higbee dispatches business, he will get through with the docket this week. There are on the docket 117 chancery cases, 104 common law cases, and 44 criminal cases. A change of Venue was allowed in the case of Joseph Adams, to Hancock county, and the witnesses recognized o appear there at the next term of the court. – Owen Manion has not been rearrested nor any of his companions who broke jail.

 ——————–

            → We are informed that the editor of the Journal intends to take a sober “thought.” If he should there will be a panic in the whisky traffic.

 ——————–

            → A “reliable gentleman,” informs us that the citizens of Bushnell intend to fence off a portion of their town for a duck and goose pond. If that should be so we are afraid that the editor of the Press would be the first goose put in it.

March 18, 1865

Macomb Eagle

Arbitrary Arrests.

            The discussion of the new conscription law has given the opponents of the arbitrary arrests, in the Senate, an opportunity to speak their minds, and they have done so – democrats and republicans, conservatives and radicals have denounced that despotism which deprives a citizen of the great bulwark of constitutional liberty – trial by jury. Said Senator Hale:

“If trial by jury is overthrown in this country, take the rest. I would not lift my hand, nor open my mouth nor council one of my constituents to shed a drop of blood or pay a dollar of treasure if the constitution is to be preserved emasculated of this great safeguard of liberty. In these times when so much is demanded and so much at stake, with a generous confidence I would give the Administration almost everything they want. I would and I have consented, that the habeas corpus may be suspended, and these extraordinary tribunals may be erected and instituted for the trial of everybody that voluntarily comes forward and connects himself with the public service. But, sir, I you are going to throw a drag net over the land, if you are going to bring in this whole people and subject them to the penalties that may be inflicted by military tribunals, then the last step in the humiliation and the degradation of the country is taken, and we shall be lest fit instruments for any despotism that the bold and lawless may see proper to establish over us.”

We believe that there are but few of the “loyal” in this section of the country who will endorse the words of Senator Hale. Military tribunals, military court martials, “military necessity,” military arrests, are just what suits these very “loyal” gentlemen, provided those who are made to suffer are Democrats.

 ——————–

The Law Authorizing the Indexing Circuit Court Records.

            Sec. 1 Be it enacted, By the people of the State of Illinois, represented in the General Assembly, that it shall be the duty of the Clerk of the Circuit Courts, (and County Courts having Common Law Jurisdiction,) of the several Counties in this State, to provide two well bound books, to be denominated, “Plaintiff’s Index to Court Records,” and “Defendant’s Index to Court Records” to be ruled and printed, substantially in the following manner:

[Here follows a tabular form showing the manner in which the books shall be kept, which we omit. – Ed. Eagle.]

In which said book all the cases which shall have been determined in said Court, within seven years next proceeding the passage of said Act, and all cases now pending and which shall hereafter be commenced; shall be entered; said book shall set forth the names of the parties, kind of action, term commenced, record books, and pages on which said cases are recorded the term disposed of, date of judgment, books and pages of the judgment docket, fee book, certificates of levy, sale and redemption, records on which they are entered satisfied or not satisfied and No. of case. The defendant’s Index shall be ruled and printed the same manner as the plaintiff’s, except the parties shall be reversed and the Clerks shall receive a fee of ten cents, (10c.) for each entry, as provided for in this act, to be paid by the parties in the suit, except for the cases now disposed of, which shall be paid by the Board of Supervisor or county Courts of the several counties in this state, and they are hereby authorized and required to make appropriation for that purpose.

Sec. 2. Any failure on the part of the Clerks of the several counties in this state to procure said books, within four months from and after the passage of this act, and keep them up, shall be considered in contempt of court and punished by a fine of fifty dollars, ($50 00.)

Sec 3. The Board of Supervisors and county courts of the several counties in this state, are required to pay for said books in the same manner as for other books, and they shall be public record of the several counties.

Sec. 4. This act shall be deemed a public act, and be in force from and after its passage.

Approved, Feb. 16th, 1865.

The above is a general law but a local bill was passed at the same time applicable to McDonough County which is similar to the general law with the exception that it requires but one book to be kept instead of two and allows the clerk a fee of only ten cents for each case indexed whereas the general law allows a fee of ten cents for each entry made.

The Circuit Clerk of this county, as we understand, proposes to work under the private law, unless it is repealed by the general law. The private law will be published as soon as received.

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The Registry Law.

            In the Herald this morning will be found a certified copy of the Registry law passed at the late session of our State Legislature. It is very important to every citizen of the State that he should at least try to make himself familiar with the provisions of this law. It is long – there is a great deal more of it than there need have been. It takes up more than two columns of our paper – it might have been said in a half column. The whole law is wrong, from beginning to end. No law of the kind ought ever to be passed. It was gotten up by designing men, who will, if permitted to go on and have their own way, entirely and effectually subvert the liberties of the people. Such laws are designed to be obstructions in the way of honest, poor men on their road to the polls. If a law were passed requiring the Mississippi river to be obstructed by sand bars and snags, in order to prevent all the craft that have the right to navigate it from making their way up or down the river, it would not be more unjust or unprincipled. A legislature has the same right precisely to obstruct the navigation of a river that it has to obstruct the road of the honest, poor and patriotic masses to the polls. In the law which we print this morning, there are many, very many objectionable, obnoxious and disgraceful provisions. We would cheerfully point them out to our readers, but it would do no good. It is a law of the land, and will have to be obeyed. It cannot be repealed until the people send a Democratic majority to the legislature. The party that is in favor of maintaining, sustaining and perpetuating the principles as well as the forms of self-government – the good old national Democratic party – must first be restored to power, before the true principles of republican, government can be restored to the people. In justification and support of this odious law, it will be said, we know, that its object is to prevent those from voting who are not entitled to vote under the constitution of the State. This pretense is a pitiful subterfuge and humbug. It is a notorious fact that there has always been more illegal voting, greater frauds upon the ballot box in the States that have had such laws than in those that have not had them. It would be much more appropriate and truthful to say that the object of this law was to encourage illegal voting – for such has always been the operation and effect of such laws. We print this law not because we approve of it, but because it is now a law of the State, and must therefore be respected and obeyed. – No one should fail to read it. Every voter is interested in it. Let its provisions be made as familiar as possible to the people, and then let them respect and obey them, until such time as the Democracy shall have power to wipe out the whole thing. – Quincy Herald.

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Vawter’s Nursery.

            I have a choice variety of

3 and 4 Year old Apple Trees,

for sale this spring. A fine lot of

Cherry and Dwarf Pears,

                             Evergreens,                             Currants, red and white;

Gooseberries,                Raspberries.

A large lost of Grape Vines, such as Delaware, Concord, Hartford, Prolific, Isabell, Clinton, Catawba, Union Village, Diana, and Oporto.

All trees and vines warranted in good order, and from 50 to 100 per cent cheaper than eastern prices. Call and examine my stock and prices before you buy. Nursery first block northeast of Clisby & Trull’s Mill. Residence 4 blocks north of the square.

Terms Cash.                                                                                        A. T. VAWTER.

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Farms for Sale.

       The subscriber offers the following FARMS in McDonough County, for sale:

160 acres, three miles west of Table Grove on the Table Grove and Macomb road. There is on said farm two Houses, two Wells, Barn, Sheds, good Fences, and a small Orchard, with 40 acres of Timber Land 5 miles from the farm. Price $5,000.

625 acres 2 1-2 miles west of the town of Vermont, on the Vermont and Doddsville road. – There is about 130 acres in cultivation; with two Houses, two Stables, Well Yards, &c. There is on said farm one of the best Coal Banks in the country, and a never-failing Spring of Water; also a creek running through the whole length of said land. Said tract of land can be made one of the best stock farms in the country, Price $6,000.

160 acres 2 ½ miles northwest of the town of Bushnell. There is on said farm two good Houses, two Wells, Stables, Sheds, Corncrib, Orchard, &c. There was raised on said farm the last year $4,000 worth of grain. Price $6,500.

The above lands are all in good neighborhoods and convenient to Schools. Titles all perfect.

I also have for sale 200 acres of Timber Land lying along Spoon river, east of the town of Marietta, in Fulton county, held by tax titles, which I will sell at Two Dollars per acre. Time will be given on a part of the payments, if wished.

H. L. ROSS.

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Caution.

            Whereas my wife Rachel Ann Haines, having left my bed and board without just cause or provocation. All persons are hereby warned not to trust her on my account, as I will not be responsible for any debts of her contracting.

ABRAHAM HAINES.

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FOR SALE – CHEAP FOR CASH.

            A house containing four rooms; situated on West Johnson street, in the city of Macomb, with three quarters of an acre of ground, with smoke, coal and wood house – good well of water – stable, hen house and cow shed, &c., Apple trees, Peach trees and small fruits, &c.

W. P. BARRETT.

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            Chalmers. – The Democrats of Chalmers township will hold a convention for the purpose of nominating township officers, at Dunsworth’s school house on Saturday, March 18th, 1865.

The committee appointed to fill the quota of said township, will be at the meeting and make a report of their doings.

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            → Keep it before the people that at the annual town election the voters are called upon to vote for or against the County Bounty to volunteers or drafted men.

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            → Strader & Co. have just received a large invoice of Boots, Shoes, Hats & Caps, which he is selling cheaper than any other house in town.

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            → Our friend John B. Purdy has sold his farm and intends to remove to Washington Territory. We are sorry to part with John, but wish him success in his new home.

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            → The railroad bridge over Crooked Creek gave way on Wednesday night, just after the train going East passed over it. – This will necessarily delay the transportation of passengers and Freight for a while.

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            → If you want the best of lumber go to H. R. Bartleston, south side of the square. – He has on hand and for sale cheap, the largest assortment of lumber, lath, shingles, lime, hair, etc., that has ever been brought to this market.

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            → Thomas Johnson has left this week for the “Old Country.” Tom thinks he has got about as much liberty and freedom “in his” as he wanted.

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            → Dr. Ritchey, at Frank Kyle’s old stand, has just received a fresh lot of drugs, medicines, oils & C., which he offers low for cash. Call and examine his stock.

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            School. – Mrs. Matthewson will commence a school for three months in the 4th ward school house, on the first Monday in May.

Terms, for spelling, reading and writing, $3.00, higher branches $3.50. Mrs. M., as assistant to Mr. Kendrick, gave universal satisfaction.

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            → The quota of McDonough County lacks but 49 of being filled. Lamoine township is farthest behind having put in but two men. We hope she will follow the example of other townships and relieve McDonough entirely of the draft.

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            New Goods. – A. J. Davis, of the Cheap Cash store, has been East among the cotton speculators during the recent panic. He has bought a large stock of spring and summer goods at a large decline on former prices, and of course will sell them low. The well known reputation of Mr. D. continues to increase his enormous business. May he ever prosper.

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            → Just received, and, for sale at a very small margin, a fair assortment of rag and fancy carpet, carpet chain, cotton and stocking yarns. Remember the place, at the old stand north side of the square.

John Venable.

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            → I have for sale those “tiptop” star and check Cassimers. Call and examine our stock whether you are ready to shell out the greenbacks or not.

John Venable.

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            A New Provost Marshal. – We understand that Mr. Richard Lawrence is appointed deputy provost marshal for this county and as we understand will proceed to correct the enrollment list, and see that justice is done to the county, in case of another draft. We hope Mr. L. will appoint enrolling officers endowed to some extent with integrity, energy, and common sense, which cannot be said of a majority of those heretofore appointed as the enrollment of Emmet township amply proves.

A correct enrollment would have saved to this county 150 men under the present call, which had to be furnished at an average of $450 to the man. Making in the aggregate $67,500 which the county has been defrauded out of by a set of blockheads. This sum alone would have built the Court house or if applied on the just quota of the county would have paid the bounty indebtedness.

The men who perpetrated this egregious stupid and criminal blunder are as irresponsible as they are culpible. They understand the rules of poker better than the rules of war or common sense and to indulge their natural propensities would sacrifice the best interests and the material wealth of the county. Sixty-seven thousand five hundred dollars is much easier squandered than made.

Mr. Lawrence has the reputation of being courteous and affible and in the prosecution of business industrious and energetic, and we have no doubt will personally superintend the correction of the enrollment lists, and perfect them in such a way as to relieve McDonough of excessive quotas in the future.

We hope that in future every man will be personally consulted as to his age and in cases of doubt that his Bible will be referred to. Let no man presume to know how old or how young his neighbor is nor send him into the service for an inadvertant joke dropped in the harvest field. Let here say evidence be done away with.

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Sisters of Benevolence.

            The following is a statement of the amount of receips and expenditures:

Whole amount received from contributions and Fair,                          $1,189 85

Which was distributed as follows”

To the relief of 37 families, most of them soldiers’ families                      761 31

Donation to Christian Commission                                                               200 00

“           Soldiers Aid Macomb                                                                    100 00

Expenses of Fair                                                                                                  127 54

Total                                                                                                                 $1,189 85

 

 

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