February 25, 1865

Macomb Eagle

The Fall of Charleston.

            Charleston at last had to yield. – Thus is chronicled another brilliant achievement of General Sherman. – For the last twelve months every important effort of this distinguished general has been marked with success.

Charleston was the first city to inaugurate rebellion. – She boasted in defraut tone of her impregnable forts, strong walls and indomitable courage of her citizens, little dreaming that she could be made to yield to the “infernal yankee.” But she too has to succumb, and her proud and self-arrogant citizens have to bow in humble submission to the power of the federal arms.

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            New York has a brilliant Governor – leastwise he has made a brilliant remark: In his message to the senate transmitting a notice that Congress had abrogated the present Federal constitution, he said: “The day is not far distant when the Constitution of the United States will harmonize with the Declaration of Independence.” – How unfortunate that Mr. Fenton did not live at the time the Constitution was framed so as to have informed those noodles, George Washington and James Madison how to make their acts “harmonize!”

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Two Volumes.

            The recent republican general assembly of Illinois resolved, just before final adjournment, that the private laws it had passed should be published in two volumes. The legislature of 1857, in which the same party was dominant, ground out so many charters for individual aggrandizement that the volume, containing them has ever since been referred to as a monstrous monument of bad legislation. It was reserved for the twenty-fourth general assembly to eclipse its predecessor in the magnitude of its labors in behalf of chartered monopolies, and to such an extent that it requires two volumes to contain its handiwork! And this is the body that voted to pay its members in gold for their labors in the manufacture of private corporations! We suppose the general laws will be issued in pamphlet, and a small one at that.

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            The Dayton Journal says a bill to be introduced into the Legislature to prohibit school boys from playing “tag” at recess. The Legislature is full of business, and determined to make laws enough to force everybody to be virtuous. The Ohio Legislature is not unlike the Missouri State convention.

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Gross Inequality of Taxation.

            We are rapidly tending to a monied aristocracy. Even in England, where the nobility and other men of wealth control legislation, the holders of securities of the government have to bear their just proportion of the taxes. But by the recent legislation of congress, our wealthy men and banks, and other monied corporations, who vest their capital or moneys in United States stocks, payable in gold, giving them an income equal to from twelve to fifteen cent premium, are exempt from all local taxation upon such investments.

Our farmers, mechanics, and other industrial classes, therefore, have to sustain nearly the whole burthen of State, county, town, city and village taxation, including highway taxes, and taxes for the support of our common schools. – And the United States government, by ordering drafts from the citizens to increase the army, instead of offering such bounties as will insure volunteers, compels the states, counties and other localities, to offer such bounties and to provide for their payment by local taxation. The result of this is to throw nearly the whole expense of recruiting for the army as well as the expenses of the State, county and other localities upon the industrial classes, for the special benefit of the monied aristocracy who have invested their property in United States stocks, payable in gold. The contractors, those special favorites of the United States government, who have made their millions by speculations upon the misfortunes of their country, and have invested their enormous profits in United States stocks, are also exempted from all local taxation. No one should hereafter be elected to congress, or to the state legislature, who will not pledge himself to oppose and prevent such unequal taxation, whenever he has an opportunity to do so. And members of congress, who have already been elected, should be instructed by their constituents, and senators should be instructed by the state legislature, to repeal all laws which have a tendency to exempt the property of the men of wealth from local taxation, so as to relieve the industrial classes and the citizens of small means from the enormous weight of local taxation which is now so unjustly thrown upon them.

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Carrying the Doctrine to its Legitimate Results.

            The abolition press is making a terrific howl over the fact that Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, of Gen. Sherman’s army, while marching through the State of Georgia in its recent campaign, refused to burden the march and efficacy of the army by allowing all the wenches, old negroes and black children in the country to come into his camps, eat up their subsistence, and in every way prove injurious to his army while rendering it, nor the negroes any possible good. Because he cast them off, or rather refused to encourage them to hang on, they charge him with brutality, inhumanity, and pro slaveryism. And from this fact arose the opposition in the United States Senate to the confirmation of his well earned and highly deserved promotion to the rank of Major General.

As a General and Warrior who seeks success by the power of his arms and the efficacy of his soldiers Gen. Davis is completely justified in the eyes of sane men. In an enemy’s country, on a perilous exhibition, without fully knowing the obstacles to be encountered, he would have laid himself liable to severe censure should he have hampered his movements by adding to his train numberless useless and helpless persons. As a civilian he is justly excused by the order of Gen. Sherman, himself, who instructed his officers to permit such negroes only to follow the camp as could be made serviceable. It is reasonable to suppose that he, as all other subordinate officers obeyed these instructions, and hence he stands precisely upon the footing of the others.

The secret of this attack lies in the fact that Gen. Davis is one of the very few Democrats in the army who have not, for the sake of office sold himself, body and soul to the abolitionists, and they seize upon this flimsy pretext to begin a war upon him which will ultimately result in his being relieved of his command and the country robbed of his much needed and very valuable services in the field. From this same spirit our best Generals have been compelled to leave the service, and hence we are to day with but two or three general officers in the service whose names are illustrious in the pages of history, while there are several such at home who would gladly, were it not for this intolerance, assume active duty and lead our brave soldiers to certain victory. So it goes. In the language of Gen. Sherman, “The North has gone mad about the negro,” and in that madness everything is sacrificed to the altar of their Etheopian God. One more good victory by Sherman by which our people are more assured of success and feel less the want of a General, and he, too, will become the object of their attacks, and he victim at which their venom will all be thrown.

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The Constitutional Amendment.

            The following is the resolution and proposed amendment to the Federal Constitution, passed by the present Congress and submitted to the Legislatures of the several States for their ratification or rejection:

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, (two-thirds of both Houses concurring,) That the following article be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which, when ratified by three-fourths of said Legislatures, shall be valid, to all intents and purposes, as a part of the said Constitution, namely:

Article XIII.

            Sec. 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

Sec. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Approved February 1, 1865.

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            ‒ Our Representative, Wm. H. Neece returned home on Friday last, and has been quite sick ever since.

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            ‒ Mr. Charles Chandler has been confined to his room for a week or so past by sickness, but we are glad to learn that he is now improving rapidly.

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            ‒ We regret to learn that Dr. John Montgomery is confined to his room by sickness. We hope to see him around again soon.

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            ‒ Mr. Benjamin Vail who is considerably deranged, was sent to Jacksonville on Monday last, but on account of some informality, was sent back on Tuesday last.

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            ‒ There was quite a rejoicing here last night over the fall of Charleston. Several houses were illuminated, and bonfires, skyrockets, etc., were the order of the night.

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            ‒ We learn that a number of our business men contemplate building country residences in Bushnell this summer.

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            ‒ Mr. Dewey, wishing to make room for a large stock of clothing, is now selling his old stock at greatly reduced prices.

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            ‒ Dr. Nesbit has sold his dwelling house in the Western addition, to Mr. George H. Payne.

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            ‒ Mr. Wyne, postmaster, informs us that he has received no orders to take defaced postage currency at their face. So you that have defaced currency, will have to dispose of them as best you can.

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            ‒ R. J. Adcock has purchased of his former, partner Mr. Moab Lovely, his interest in the property known as the ‘American House.’ Mr. Adcock informs us that he again contemplates going into the grocery business this spring.

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            ‒ A. J. Davis started this week for the east to lay in his stock of spring and summer goods. We notice that Mr. Davis has lately been refitting his store room, and it now looks as ‘neat as a new pin.’

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            ‒ Andrew and John Allison sold to Sacket & Co., 100 head of hogs which averaged 325 lbs. Considering the number it is decidedly the best lot of hogs that has been sold in this county this season.

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            ‒ S. H. Hogan Esq., of Scotland township, returned home from Ohio on Saturday last. While in Ohio, Mr. Hogan purchased a fine lot of brood mares. This is an improvement which has been much needed, and we are glad to see that our farmers are waking up to the importance of having the best of brood mares.

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            ‒ If you want the latest daily papers magazines, novels etc., go to the post office. Willie always keeps the latest news. He also has a large stock of albums, letter, and note paper, envelopes, school books, etc., which he offers cheap.

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            ‒ There is quite a demand for dwelling houses at this time, and almost any kind of a house demands a good price. Cannot some of our moneyed men be induced to put up a lot of houses to rent. We are sure that they can get more interest on their money invested in this manner than in any other way.

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            ‒ Joseph Anderson and James W. Matthews, created quite a stir in our city on Friday last, by bringing a couple of wenches to town. Mr. Anderson informs us that large numbers of our citizens have already called to pay their respects to his house keeper.

We understand that our friend Thad, wishes, on account of the loss of his teeth, to procure a wench as a wet nurse.

Now that the black laws are repealed, we expect in a short time to see our city filled with “American citizens of African descent.”

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            ‒ The members of the Christian church of this city have been holding for the past two or three weeks, a series of prayer meetings from house to house, the result of which has been to allay all feelings of envy and jealousy, that have existed on the part of the members, and re-kindled the spirit of brotherly love.

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            ‒ We call attention to the card of Dr. Blaisdell in this weeks paper. The Dr. has resided in our city for some three or four years, and in the practice of his profession has given entire satisfaction.

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            ‒ The attention of our readers is directed to the card of Drs. Pittman & Akin. Dr. Pittman has been practicing medicine for a number of years past in Tennessee and vicinity, and has given universal satisfaction. We commend the Dr. to all in need of ‘physic.’

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            ‒ Our streets and sidewalks are in a filthy condition. The late squall in the weather has left them in such a state that it is with the greatest difficulty that ladies can perambulate. While there is a spirit of improvement shown in the way of building, not surpassed any town of its size in the State, we think it no more than just that our side walks and streets should undergo a thorough repairing. We hope the Sun will soon bid the mud ‘dry up.’

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            ‒ Josh Billings says ‘If you don’t kno how to chu terbacker, luze no time to larn. The best wa iz to go behind a hog pen and practis before you chaw in publik; but persevear, it’s the only way your pa learnt.’

February 24, 1865

Macomb Journal

CHARLESTON IS OURS!

            After three years of incessant trial, from the front, Charleston the proud, fire-eating city of the chivalrous South – Charleston, the “cradle of the rebellion,” is at last in our possession. The indomitable Sherman has succeeded in compelling its evacuation.

Only three more strong holds to take, viz: Wilmington, Petersburg and Richmond, and the war will be virtually ended.

Three cheers for Sherman!

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That “Mistake.”

            The Bushnell Union Press calls on the printers of Macomb to inform it who made a certain alleged mistake a few weeks since, in publishing the proceedings of the Board of Supervisors. – We are not aware that there has been a “mistake” made. The copy that was furnished us was set up as furnished, without adding to or taking from one word, as can be proved by the County Clerk’s record. The book is open for inspection by any one who wishes to satisfy himself of the truth or falsity of our assertion. We did not know the resolution was made or published, until we were called on to rectify the “mistake.”

As for our being afraid of losing the county seat, we will just state that we are willing to have the thing tested by a vote of the people, We have too much faith in the good sense of the people of McDonough county to fear the result. The citizens of Macomb will abide by the result, let it go which way it will.

Furthermore, it is charged that our citizens are not willing to help build the new court house. We defy any one to point out half a dozen of our tax payers who are not willing to be taxed for that purpose [fold] or three who oppose the tax on the ground that we already pay tax that should be equally borne by the rest of the county – that our pauper tax exceeds that of the balance of the whole county, and, therefore, until things are restored to the former state, they are unwilling to be taxed for what is a necessity of the county.

We will say this much on behalf of our citizens: That whenever the Board of Supervisors of McDonough county show that they are earnest about having a new court house, Macomb will be found doing her part, and paying her full share.

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“Cool.”

            The Bushnell Union Press, of last week, coping our article of week before last, in relation to the “bounty orders” to be paid drafted men and volunteers, insinuates that we are trying to injure the credit of the county. We guess that we have as much interest in keeping up the credit of the county as somebody else, and when we penned the article spoken of we did so after talking to several who have all their property in this county, and who wish to do all they can to keep up the county credit. We may have been precipitate in our remarks, and it may be wrong, – as the thing was done, and no chance to back down – but we “can’t see it.”

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Peace.

            Again we are thrilled with a speedy prospect of peace, but this time it is not through the imbecile efforts of Blair, Stevens and Hunter, but by the manly, energetic efforts of our brave boys in blue, led by Sherman, Grant, Terry, Gilmore, Farragut and others. Now that the rebels have given up all the sea coast, look for them to concentrate their forces for one general, decisive battle – one that will tell the tale. If they are whipped, as we have no doubt they will be, they will give up, and take up with such terms as we may offer them. If, on the other hand, they should succeed in having the victory perch on their banners, it will only prolong the struggle for a short time. – We anticipate an early peace.

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Draft Postponed.

            The order for postponing the draft is only applicable to those districts and townships which show a disposition to fill up their quotas by volunteering. – Townships of our own county, we believe, are out of the draft, having their quotas filled, or nearly so, by volunteering. Good for old McDonough.

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Rebel Barbarity.

            Before the evacuation of Charleston they attempted to destroy the city by fire. The attempt was only partially successful. By an explosion, and the conflagration that followed it, hundreds of the poor women, children and old men lost their lives, and hundreds of others were rendered homeless. The rebel iron-clads were found in the harbor, destroyed. A loaded blockade runner, just arrived, was captured, and two others are expected. The stars and stripes now float over Fort Sumter and all the formidable defenses of Charleston harbor.

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            Robbery in Fulton County. – We learn from the Lewistown Union, of the 21st, that a wealthy farmer by the name of Herr, living about two miles southeast of Canton, was called upon at his house, by a group of guerillas on Sunday just before dark and ordered to deliver over his money. Fortunately he had but about $30 in his safe, which was all the villains obtained except a silver watch of little value.

One or two other men sitting in the room were ordered not to move. One of them had about $30 loose in his pocket, which he managed to throw in the corner without being observed, and the robbers did not get it.

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Refused Their Pay.

            All the Democratic members of the Legislature, with the exception of two, Barret, of the House, and Mason of the Senate, refused to receive their pay in greenbacks, the remainder retaineded Mr. Edwards to apply for a mandamus at the April term of the Supreme Court.

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Short of Food.

            The rebels are getting short of food in consequence of the vast yield of the Valley of Virginia, which had, in former years, been secured, falling into our hands last year. It is stated that thousands of rebel soldiers’ families have been without meat for the last six months.

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War Rumors

            New York, February 21. – The World prints the following rumors in circulation here.

“Telegrams from Washington to private parties in the city state that Lee had sent 30,000 men to reference Beauregard, and enable him to check the advance of General Sherman; that General Grant is already aware of this fact, and that the Army of the Potomac is once more in motion. It is also stated that General Sheridan is advancing in heavy force, with Gordonsville or Lynchburg as the objective point. If it is true that Lee has moved troops South, it is because Lee considers the safety of North and South Carolina of far more importance than even the possession of Richmond and the occupation of Virginia.

It was also positively asserted yesterday that Wilmington was in our possession, having been evacuated by the rebels.”

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            A Probable Bounty Jumper. – A few evenings since, says the Quincy Whig, as the train on the C. B. & Q. R. R. from that city was approaching Plymouth, the engineer noticed the usual signal for stopping the train given by pulling the bell rope. He immediately whistled on the brakes and reversed his engine, but thinking that nobody connected with the train would be likely to give the signal at that time he immediately put on steam again and went on. When again under way the engineer mounted the tender and discovered behind it and on the front platform of the postoffice car, a person in the uniform of a soldier. He charged him with pulling the rope, which he denied for a while but finally acknowledged that he did it. Not supposing he would try to escape while they were going at that rate of speed, the engineer returned to his post, calculating to have him arrested as soon as they reached the station, but he had no sooner disappeared than the soldier jumped off. He was seen by the baggage master to turn several summersaults before he came to a full stop but contrary to all expectation he jumped up apparently uninjured, and taking leg bail, was soon lost in the distance. Uncle Sam undoubtedly lost another soldier by the operation and somebody else several hundred dollars bounty money.

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            The State Penitentiary. – The Illinois State Penitentiary Commissioners, in their report to the Legislature, for the years 1863-4, state that there were 586 convicts at Joliet at the close of last year. The prison building is not yet completed, and the report states that there is now due on the work $26,818.38, and the Commissioners ask the Legislature for further appropriation of $149,200 to complete the work. But, as our readers are aware, the Legislature has refused to make the appropriation asked for, so that the work of finishing the prison must be postponed for at least two years, which is to be regretted. When finished, Illinois will have the finest and most substantial State Prison building in the United States.

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            – A late Macon paper contains this paragraph: “Cabbage, $15 per head; cucumbers, $10 each; a bunch of six fish, $20.” And this also, which bears some relation to the former: “A disgraceful affair is now going on up town. A mob of women with the black flag are marching from store to store on a pillaging expedition. The Pelham Cadets are ordered out to disperse them.” In any other country such facts would argue want, destitution and despair.

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FAIR!!

The Ladies of Vermont, purpose holding, in the Methodist New Church, a

Sanitary Fair,

and will be glad to receive donations from any who are sufficiently interested to give.

The Fair will be held on

MARCH 3D and 4TH, ’65.

They will accept useful or fancy articles,
POULTRY, BUTTER, EGGS, WHEAT,
CORN, and POTATOES,

or anything Convertible into Money.

            All friends of the Soldier from town, or the Country are earnestly invited to attend.

Fair will Open at 10 O’Clock, A. M.

ADMISSION, 15 CTS.

            Contributions received by the Committee of Arrangements:

MOLLIE ANN DILWORTH,
ANDREW ANNA HAMER,
MARY THOMAS, KATE DILWORTH.

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Fair at Vermont.

By notice in another column it will be seen that the ladies of Vermont, Fulton county, Ill., purpose holding a Sanitary Fair in that place for the purpose of aiding our soldiers in the field. We hope our citizens will respond to their appeal for contributions.

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“He who by the plow would thrive,
Must either hold himself or drive.”

            And they who want a good photograph of themselves or their friends, should not fail to call at the excelsior photograph gallery of Hawkins & Philpot, southeast corner of the square.

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Personal.

Mr. James Corcoran, a young gentleman of this city, has been made 1st Lieutenant of Co. A, 152nd Ill. Vol. He left here on Wednesday last for his new duties. Success to him.

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The Downfall of Charleston!

BONFIRES AND ILLUMINATION!

Spontaneous Celebration!

            The confirmation of the news of the occupation of Charleston by our forces was duly celebrated in this city on Wednesday evening by our citizens in a general jubilee. At dark all was quiet, and every thing betokened a quiet evening, such as we usually have, when a couple of drums were brought out, which soon attracted attention. – A bonfire was soon burning on the northwest corner of the square, sky rockets went up, Roman candles shone out, wheels went round, the windows of Johnson’s store, the Brown House, Randolph House, Watkins & Co’s, M’Elrath’s and Wadsworth’s stores blazed with light, and a general uproar and rejoicing took place.

Young America appeared in all his glory; some of the boys with cow-bells others with horns, tin pans, oyster cans, &c., made night hideous with their din.

The ladies, too, were out in full force, and appeared to enjoy the scene highly.

Altogether, it was a good old time, considering that it was got up without premeditiation or preparation of any kind. We will get better prepared to get up a grand jollification over the occupation of Richmond.

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Burglaries.

Wednesday night last some burglars broke into the grocery store of Wadham & Stowell, by prying open the door until the lock broke. They were rewarded for their pains by some two or three dollars in postal currency and small silver pieces. Nothing else was taken except some crackers.

The bookstore of S. J. Clarke & Co. was also broken into, and the money drawer robbed of its contents – about two dollars in silver and postal currency. The tool that was used to pry open the doors appeared to be a two inch chisle, which was procured from the carpenter shop of Mr. Lucius Walker.

These are the first burglaries that have taken place in this city for some time past, but it appears the “gents” who done the “biz” were not experts in the work, nor were they rewarded to any great extent for their labors. – No traces of the burglars have been found as yet, but we hope that they may be ferreted out and brought to justice.

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Police Items.

Thomas I. Wiggins, having on board a considerable quantity of “tangle leg,” amused himself the other day by breaking in the show window of Mr. Loven Garret, groceryman, for which his honor, Squire Withrow, assessed the damages at $5 and costs. The facetious Thomas went to the calaboose.

James Vail thought it would be a fine thing to evade the liquor law and so he opened out somewhere in the brush north of the depot. He helped the treasury of the city by depositing $30.

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Death of Thomas Smithers, Sen.

We neglected to notice last week the death of this old citizen. He died on Saturday, the 11th inst., after a lingering and painful illness of several months duration, and was buried on the 12th with Masonic honors, of which order had long been a member. His age, as near as we could ascertain, was 96 years.

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“I am thy father’s ghost,”

and I am not forbid to tell of the wonderfully cheap grocery of Watkins & Co., on the southeast corner of the square, in their new brick, where may be found the best of coffee, sugars, teas, and everything else usually found in well regulated grocery stores. Also the celebrated Buell’s boot. Remember the new brick in town when you want to purchase any of the above goods.

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Personal.

Hon. Wm. H. Neece, our representative in the Legislature, has been very ill since his arrival home.

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The 22nd.

The 22nd of February, the anniversary of the birth of the “Father of our Country,” George Washington, was silently observed in our city by hoisting the national flag on the pole in the square, during the day. At night, the Dancing club met at Campbell’s Hall and “tripped the light fantastic” with great zest.

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Nigger in the Pit!!!

Just before the repeal of the “black laws” of our State, and while the subject was being agitated, our copperhead – O, beg pardon; we’ve been told that it won’t do to say copperhead anymore – we mean Democratic (!) friends howled long and loud over the “abolition outrage.” They would have us believe that our State would be overrun with the “baboons,” “gorrillas,” &c., as they politely termed the negro, and that the laboring class of our white population would be ousted by the blacks, and all that sort of things, and more too. Well, the “black laws” were repealed, and the “gorrillas” have commenced arriving but, would you believe it? the cop – Democrats – are the persons who are “importing” them. Two of the prominent cop – hang it, we can’t help saying copperhead! – Democrats have went and gone and done it! Brought to our quiet and peaceful city two – she niggers! Think of it – two darkies of the female persuasion to take the bread out of “white folks” mouths! Overrun with niggers, eh! O, consistency! thou art a jewel, but thy dwelling place is not with the Democracy.

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Sherman heard from.

Gen. Sherman has at last been heard from. He captured a large lot of cotton at Savannah, and Geo. W. Bailey, on the east side of the square is selling cotton goods of all kinds at greatly reduced prices, preparatory to putting in his Spring stock.

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Large Hogs.

Messrs. Sackett & Wadsworth bought one hundred head of hogs, one day last week, from Messrs. John and Andrew Allison, the average weight of each was 325 lbs. The weight of these hogs show why our shipment of grain in the bulk is not so large as some other stations – it’s put into stock.

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Muddy.

The streets of our city are paved with mud this week.

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            Two Union Regiments of Ex-Rebels. – General Sully is in Davenport, Iowa, for the purpose of organizing two regiments of repentant rebels, lately in Rock Island prison, who have taken the oath allegiance and declared their willingness to enter the service of the Government against the Indians.

February 18, 1865

Macomb Eagle

No Peace Yet.

            We are not of those who believe the failure to enter upon negotiation for peace, postpones the day when such negotiation will take place. Such a conference was necessary. It was required in order to dispel forever the delusion prevalent at the South that the United States would negotiate for peace upon the basis of the independence of the Confederacy. The emphatic refusal to consider or discuss that point has been officially announced to the people of the South, and they now know that there is no party at the North favorable to any peace which involves separation. The simple issue of war, desolating war, and military rule on the one hand, or peace and the Union on the other, should be presented.

The advance of General Sherman with an army equal to any obstacle that may be presented, will have a salutary influence upon the consideration by the southern people of this issue. The rebel army under Lee is bound hand and foot to Richmond; the forces under Wheeler and Beauregard will be wholly unable to even check Sherman’s progress. His march will be one of desolation to the land which is arrayed against the flag, and if burning crops and storehouses are preferred to peace and Union, then those who prefer them will have them to their heart’s content.

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Quota of McDonough County.

            The following is the quota of the several Townships of this county under the last call, most of which, we understand has now been filled, and consequently relieves them from the draft.

Eldorado         .           .           .           31
Industry          .           .           .           20
Bethel              .           .           .           30
Lamoin            .           .           .           29
Tennessee        .           .           .            3
Chalmers         .           .           .           25
Scotland          .           .           .           27
New Salem      .           .           .          36
Mound            .           .           .           36
Emmett           .           .           .          25
Hire     .           .           .           .          33
Blandinville     .           .           .        22
Sciota  .           .           .           .          20
Walnut Grove .           .           .         34
Prairie City      .           .           .         62

Total    .           .           .         443
Macomb credit            .           .         14
Macomb City, 1st Ward credit.        5
“           “ , 2nd   “         “   .                2
“           “ , 3rd   “         “ .                 4

16
14
Total                                        30

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            ‒ We have rumors that Branchville has been occupied by Sherman’s forces; that preparations are being made for the evacuation of Richmond; and that Charleston, Wilmington, and Mobile are being, or are to be evacuated.

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            → The draft is postponed until the 8th of March. We trust that before that time the quota of McDonough county will be filled by volunteering. Most of the townships have already secured volunteers enough to exempt their townships from the draft, and the others are working with a determination that argues well for their success.

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            Rev. James M. Chase died at his residence a few miles from this place on the 10th inst., Mr. Chase is well known as one of the early settlers of this county, and has contributed perhaps as much as any other man to its growth and prosperity. His natural abilities were more than ordinary, to which was added a liberal education, a refined taste, and a high sense of moral rectitude. These qualities eminently fitted him for his position, as teacher and minister. Being a practical teacher himself, he labored successfully to improve the condition of our common schools, and subsequently attempted to establish the Macomb College, of which he became President, and in that capacity contributed materially to the advancement of education in our city. If he failed to accomplish as much as he desired, it was for want of co-operation. Of later years he has been more retired, devoting a portion of his time to the ministry. He died beloved, honored and respected by all who knew him, and has gone to that better land from whence none return. “Blessed are the dead who die in Lord.”

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            Thomas T. Smithers is no more. On Saturday last, he paid the last debt of man and his spirit took its flight to the regions of the blessed. He was among the oldest settlers of this county, having removed to this county at an early day from Kentucky. He was respected and beloved by all who knew him. His remains were followed to the cemetery by a large concourse of friends, and buried with solemn and impressive ceremonies of the Masonic Order, of which he was an honored and respected member.

 ——————–

            → A bill has passed the Legislature empowering the city council of Macomb to levy a bounty tax of three hundred dollars for each drafted man and volunteers. The above is in lieu of the proposed bill to abolish that clause of the city charter, exempting the city from general taxation for county purposes. It is a matter now with the board whether they will levy the tax or not.

In accordance with the request of a few disconcerted souls of this county, Mr. Strain introduced a bill to repeal the law authorizing the board of Supervisors of McDonough county to levy a bounty tax, which passed the Senate, but failed in the House.

A bill has also passed requiring an index to circuit court records of McDonough county, to be kept and requiring the Clerk of said court to keep abstracts of land in said county. Also a bill increasing fees of Circuit and county Clerks.

 ——————–

            → There has never been a time when Macomb gave better promise of a brisk business season than this spring. Our old business men are up to their eyes in work every day, and several new additions have lately been made, there’s room enough for all, and as many more. Business makes business.

 ——————–

            → H. R. Bartleson has just received a very large and well selected lot of lumber, consisting in part of lathes, shingles, weather boarding, fencing &c. All in need of such will find it to their interests to give him a call; as he sells lower than the lowest.

 ——————-

            → J. P. Updegraff & Co., have removed their store to the building formerly occupied by Watkins & Co., under the Randolph House, where they will be pleased to see all their old friends.

 ——————–

            → We understand that Dr. Stewart has sold out his interest in the drug store on the south side of the square to Dr. McDavit, who will continue the business at the old stand.

 ——————–

            → Mr. S. J. Hopper is fitting up the store on the north side of the square, formerly occupied by Mr. Bissell as a hardware store, for the purpose of going into the clothing business. Success to him.

 ——————–

            → Watkins & Co. have removed to their new building on the southeast corner of the square.

 ——————–

            → Quite a number of young men have recently left the city and county for the war. We shall endeavor by next week to secure a list of their names for publication.

 ——————–

Died.

            Died at Nashville, Jan. 20th 1865, of accidental gunshot wound, Frank Gadd, Co. A, 84 Reg’t Ill. Vol’s., aged 20 years.

At the county poor farm, Margaret Bingham of consumption, about 23 years of age.

February 17, 1865

Macomb Journal

The Quota of McDonough County.

            By the politeness of Mr. James Tunnicliff, we are enabled to give the exact quota of the different townships in this county. The number appears rather large, and we believe it to be incorrect. We see the papers in this, and other states, are giving Gen. Fry “particular fits” for his figuring of the quotas, and, judging from the number our county is called on to furnish, he deserves it all. We would suggest he be furnished with a copy of Ray’s Arithmetic with the injunction that he should learn to “cipher.” The following are the figures:

Deficient: Eldorado, 31; Industry, 20; Bethel, 30; Lamoine, 29; Tennessee, 3; Chalmers, 26; Scotland, 27; New Salem, 36; Mound, 36; Emmet, 25; Hire, 33; Hire, 33; Blandinville, 22; Sciota, 20; Walnut Grove, 36; Prairie City, 69. Total, 442. Excess: Macomb Township, 14; Macomb City, 1st Ward, 5; 2nd Ward, 2; 3rd Ward, 5; 4th Ward, 4. Total, 30.

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From Sherman’s Army.

            New York, Feb. 15. – The Herald’s Washington special says Richmond papers of Monday concede that Gen. Sherman has flanked Branchville, both above and below, and Hardee’s forces have evacuated that place. They also state that a Union column had reached Orangeboro, on the Columbia road, and railroad communications with Charleston are cut off except by the road via Wilmington, N. C., which will soon be cut off at Wilmington. By these operations the railroad communication between Virginia and the South is entirely cut off, and the rebel authority over the Southern States can no longer be enforced.

Richmond papers of the 14th have dispatches saying that a portion of Sherman’s forces are busily engaged in the destruction of the railroads in South Carolina, and that another column is threatening Charleston. They do not confirm the reported evacuation of that place, but it is evident from the tenor of their advices and editorials that they do not anticipate any resistance being made to Sherman’s advance. They also state that a large Yankee force has landed at Smithfield, on the North Carolina coast, and have brought locomotives with them, evidently intending to use the railroads to facilitate their military operations after they shall have captured Wilmington.

The army of the Potomac holds its newly acquired ground on Hatcher’s Run, on which very strong earthworks are now erected. There are rumors that the enemy is mining one of the Union forts in front of Petersburg. – Desertions of rebels to Gen’l Grant’s lines still continue numerous.

The World’s Hilton Head correspondent, 8th, says reliable information has been received that Sherman’s army is rapidly marching on the line of the Edisto river, and that a portion of his troops are beyond the Georgia and South Carolina railroad, where they have erected defenses preparatory to a future march. The enemy have disappeared rapidly before the advance of our troops, and they have manifested a purpose to evacuate nearly all their strongholds and retire further north. – This purpose has been the result of Sherman’s tactics. That their retreat will be slowly but surely followed up admits of no question. Our troops are known to extend over a distance of 40 miles, and for several days past they have been occupied in destroying all the railroads which connect South Carolina with the Gulf and the northern States.

The object would seem to be to isolate Branchville, Augusta and Charleston from all possible aid or reinforcements, in order to capture the garrison of each city. This important work will doubtless be completed when this letter reaches you. Some of our troops are north of Charleston, which is cut off from reinforcement. The corps are moving simultaneously on the line of the Edisto, and the towns they have passed through have been deserted by numbers of their inhabitants, who have forced he able bodied negroes to leave with them in order that they may not aid our army. Hamburg, Aiken and Orangeburg, in the rear are reported to have been captured.

Washington, Feb. 15 – The Richmond Whig, 13th, contains the following important intelligence:

Charleston, S. C., Feb. 10. – A force of the enemy, believed to be from 2,000 to 3,000 strong, landed at Grimball’s, James Island, at 8 o’clock this morning and drove in our pickets. Some skirmishing took place, but no general engagement. Grimball’s is on the Stono river, about 2 miles southwest of Charleston, the Ashly river, 2,000 yards wide, intervening. The enemy made active demonstrations at various points, but they are believed to be feints. A force attacked our troops on the Salkahatchie this morning, but were repulsed. The enemy also advanced upon the Charleston road near the Blue house, and opened with artillery, but made no impression on our lines.

On the 8th a heavy column of Yankee infantry struck the South Carolina R. R. at Grahamsville, 18 miles west of Branchville, while Kilpatrick, with a cavalry force, occupied Blackville, on the some road about 9 miles west a little northeast of Grahamsville.

A portion of Sherman’s column, it was reported yesterday, moved forward crossing the South Edisto and flanking Branchville on the west. The force has been advanced to Orangeburg, on the Columbia & Branchville road, sixteen miles west of the latter point.

——————-

 

‒ The news from Sherman is of the most encouraging character, although coming through rebel sources. The latest Richmond papers contain the report, which they evidently credit, that Sherman had captured Branchvile. – As the main body of Hardee’s forces were there it is evident a battle ust have been fought, and that victory again waits upon the gallant Sherman and his no less gallant army.

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From Rebeldom.

General Sherman’s Leniency in Georgia.

            New York, February 14.

            A correspondent of a South Carolina paper, who has been over the route of General Sherman’s march through Georgia, is surprised to find that that officer dealt so leniently with that State, and consoles himself with anticipations of the same gentle treatment for South Carolina.

The Richmond Examiner of the 10th instant, in an article on Southern railroad connections, endeavors to show how Lee’s army may be supplied from North Carolina and Georgia without the assistance of the Weldon Road.

The Legislature of Georgia is to convene in extra session tomorrow.

The Richmond Dispatch of the 11th thus sums up the situation in South Carolina: “The Edisto river rises in the southwestern portion of South Carolina, and flowing southwestwardly, empties into the Atlantic forty miles southwest of Charleston. Branchville is on the Augusta branch of the South Carolina railroad, one mile east of the point at which the railroad crosses the Edisto. This river is now the line held by General Hardee. In the neighborhood of Branchville, nearer the coast, we hold the line of the Combahee river, in the vicinity of the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. From the most authentic intelligence, it appears that the whole or a part of Sherman’s army is making active demonstrations against the Combahee Ferry, near the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, as if with the intention of marching on Charleston. The rest of his force have appeared at four points on the Edisto, namely, at New Bridge, five miles below Branchville, at Buckmaster’s, and at Holman’s Bridge, as above, and at the railroad bridge opposite that place. Our troops that held the bridge over the Salkehatchie were driven in last Wednesday. If he succeeds in forcing a passage of the Edisto, above and below Branchville, he will keep the railroad running thence to Columbia, and also the railroad to Charleston, and compel our troops to fall back from Branchville, but they will most probably evacuate it, if at any time it should appear that Sherman cannot be prevented from crossing the river.

“The above is written in the hope of giving our readers some idea of the situation in South Carolina. It was said some days ago, that Sherman was also sending a column against Augusta, on the Georgia side of the Savannah river. We have no information on this head.”

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An Offer to Murder President Lincoln.

We find the following in the advertising columns of a rebel paper – the Selma (Ala.) Dispatch – which has been sent us from the front by Colonel Hoge, of the 113th Illinois Infantry: – Chicago Journal.

One Million Dollars Wanted to Have PEACE by the 1st of March. – If the citizens of the Southern Confederacy will furnish me with the cash, or good securities for the sum of one million dollars, I will cause the lives of Abraham Lincoln, William H. Seward, and Andrew Johnson, to be taken by the first of March next. This will give us peace, and satisfy the world that cruel tyrants cannot live in a ‘land of liberty.’ If this is not accomplished, nothing will be claimed beyond the sum of fifty thousand dollars, in advance, which is supposed to be necessary to reach and slaughter the three villains.

I will give, myself, one thousand dollars towards this patriotic purpose.

Every one wishing to contribute will address box X, Cahaba, Alabama.

            December 1, 1864.

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To Be Resumed. – We see, by the Quincy Whig, that Mr. Howe, the editor and publisher of the Lagrange American, who was elected to the Missouri legislature last fall, has obtained leave of absence for the remainder of the session, and will soon resume the publication of his paper. The American was as obnoxious to the Missouri rebels as acceptable to loyal men, and there is still need for its services in that State. The full fruits of the victory so gallantly won in Missouri are now to be secured and perpetuated, and in this labor there is no more fearless and effective laborer than Mr. Howe.

——————–

 

The Railroad Business.

Through the politeness of Mr. Brown the accommodating Station Agent at the depot, we are enabled to give the following amount of the business done at this station for the year 1864. We did intend to give each thing in detail, but found that it would occupy too much time to copy them from the books, therefore we merely give the amount in full of the freights forwarded and received, and of the ticket sales. It will be seen that our citizens do some traveling.

Freight forwarded           .           .           .           $59,098.60
“               received      .           .           .               46,471.10

Total    .           .           .           105,569.70

Ticket Sales              .           .           .           $19,139.00

Grand Total     .           .           .         $124,708.70

A very respectable business, considering that this is such a “one-horse town” with no “enterprise” for business. We do not like to boast – consider it bad taste – but we believe that Macomb can show a very good record for business energy – equal to any other of its size in the West.

——————–

 

Sidewalks.

Why don’t those who are in authority see to fixing up the sidewalks in our city? It will be decidedly cheaper to put in a few planks now than to pay for a broken limb after awhile.

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A Narrow Escape.

Mr. S. S. Chapman, of the pump factory in this city, met with an accident one day last week, which came very near resulting fatally. It seems that his clothing got caught by a shaft of some part of the machinery, which is run by steam, and the shaft running at about the rate of three thousand revolutions a minute, and he was wound around the shaft in a hurry. His coat, vest and shirt were badly torn, but strange to say, he escaped without a bruise. Truly, a narrow escape.

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In Trouble.

We learn that one of the recruits by the name of Robert Barry, who left here last Monday was the victim of some designing rogue on the cars going down to Quincy. It appears that, in taking his handkerchief from his pocket, he found a silver watch in it, and immediately made inquiry as to the ownership, when it was found to belong to the Conductor of the train, who had young Barry arrested on their arrival in Quincy. Those who know the boy unite in giving him a good name, and declare their belief in his innocence. We do not believe he stole the watch, nor was cognizant of the matter till he found it in his pocket. We hope he will come out all right.

     P. S. – “Bob” is all right, and is at home.

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Festival.

The ladies of the Universalist Society of this city will hold a Festival at Campbell’s Hall, on Wednesday and Thursday evenings, March 1st and 2nd. No pains will be spared to make it a pleasant occasion.

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Newspaper Change.

The Macomb Eagle of last week contains the valedictory of Nelson Abbott, who has owned and published the paper for the last nine years. He has sold the material to J. H. Hungate, Esq., who rents it to Mr. J. B. Naylor, a young gentleman well known in this community, who proposes to run “der machine.” Mr. Abbott has our best wishes in his retirement, and we here take the opportunity to return our sincere thanks for many acts of courtesy and kindness extended to us during the last year.

We extend our [pointing finger – ed.] to “Ben,” and welcome him to the editorial tripod.

——————–

 

Off for the Army.

Last Monday a squad of recruits left here for the army. They go to fill up the quota of Prairie City township – nearly all being under the age required by law to become subject to a draft. We shall endeavor to obtain the names of those who are accepted.

P. S. – Since the above was in type, we learn that several of the boys have returned – reason, the bounty money gave out, and the boys thought it would be a dull show to get the full amount promised them after they were sworn in. It appears that the citizens of Prairie City township were only calculating too have to raise 46 men, whereas their quota is 69. Prairie City will make up what is lacking.

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The Gold Market.

While the price of gold keeps fluctuating, and everybody are on the qui vive for news as to Grant’s and Sherman’s movements, the lumber yard of H. R. Bartleson is still the center of attraction to those who wish to purchase superior lumber at cheap rates. Yard southeast corner of the square – office three doors west of Watkins & Co’s new grocery store.

 ——————–

A Handsome Store.

Messrs. Watkins & Co. have moved into their new brick store, opposite their old stand, and have fitted it up in a very handsome manner. We have often thought that a grocery store could not be fitted up to look tasty and showy but Watkins & Co. have convinced us of our mistake.

     N. B. – The firm informs us that groceries will be sold just as cheap as ever, and give polite attention to all.

 ——————–

            → The Hutchinson family gave one of their grand concerts to a large and appreciative audience on last Tuesday evening at Campbell’s Hall.

 ——————-

            → Bugle beads, a large invoice, just received at Clark’s Bookstore.

 ——————-

Pleasure.

If you want to enjoy an hour or two of genuine, unalloyed pleasure, go to the picture gallery of Hawkins & Philpot, southeast corner of the square, and you can have the opportunity. Photographs, ambrotypes, and a variety of other pictures will there greet your eye in every style and shape known to the art. There is no discount on their work.

 ——————–

Land Sale.

Mr. David Scott, of this county, has sold his farm, situated 5 miles south of this city, on the old Rushville road, for the snug little sum of $17,000. – Mr. Scott proposes to remove to this city.

 ——————–

Removed.

Joe. Updegraff, the man that keeps grocery, is removing his establishment to the Randolph block, in the room formerly occupied by Watkins & Co. – Go and see him in his new quarters.

 ——————–

Snow.

Quite a fall of snow occurred here on the night of the 14th.

 ——————–

            → The Randolph House is heavy on marriages – two occurring on one day last week.

 ——————–

            → The b’hoys had quite an amusing time snow-balling on Wednesday.

February 11, 1865

Macomb Eagle

A Few Last Words.

            With the issue of the present number my connection with The Eagle establishment ceases. I have sold the concern to Mr. J. H. Hungate, of this city.

It has been known to many of my friends that for over a year past I have desired to be released from this business. Failing health, and the advice of my physicians to seek another occupation, are the chief reasons that have caused this step.

Eight years ago this month I took charge of The Eagle. It was then just struggling into existence, and from that hour to this it has been conducted under my sole supervision. – What it has accomplished in this time needs no recounting now. That has become a part of the history of this county.

I may have committed errors. Few men do not. But I do not now call to mind any instance in which, with present light, I should have acted differently. I may have given offense to corrupt, fanatical, or hypocritical men. If so, the only apology I have to offer is, the hope that they may live the life of better men in the future.

To the many friends who have stood by me “through evil as well as good report,” I can only return my warmest acknowledgements and pray for blessings on their heads. I shall ever cherish with a fond recollection the many acts of kindness and friendship which have been extended to me by the Democrats of McDonough county. If they have not received that recompense which should have been rendered, I feel assured they will not charge the failure to a lack of will or earnest effort.

It is no small consolation, in retirement, to know that I leave The Eagle in faithful and able hands. Mr. Hungate will be found altogether worthy of the confidence of the Democrats of this county. The high standard of the paper for Democratic integrity will not be lowered, while in editorial ability it will be materially strengthened.

With my best wishes for its prosperity and warmest regards to its patrons, I bid one and all good bye!

NELSON ABBOTT.

 ——————–

Pass them Around!

            The amendment to the Constitution prohibiting slavery in all the States passed the lower house of Congress, by the aid of seventeen men who were elected as Democrats. Their names should be held up to eternal infamy, and we contribute our mite to that end by recording them here for public execration, to-wit:

  Bailey and Coffroth of Pennsylvania; Baldwin of Michigan; English of Connecticut; Ganson, Griswold, Herrick, Steele, Odell, Radford, Nelson, and of New York; Hutchins of Ohio; King and Rollins of Missouri; Yeaman of Kentucky; Sweat of Maine; Wheeler of Wisconsin.∗

The allurements of greenbacks and the seductions of Dinah were too much for their easy virtue. Let them go to their place.

 ——————–

The Bounty Voted.

            We have the satisfaction of stating that the board of supervisors promptly voted the proposed bounty to volunteers and drafted men under the present call of the President. The amount to each individual is fixed at $300, the clerk to issue orders for the same payable in one year, and bearing six per cent. interest. This is a measure of justice and right and will be endorsed by a large majority of the people of the county. The proceedings of the board will be found in this paper.

 ——————–

Censuring Old Abe.

            Hon. L. W. Ross, of the 9th district, offered the following resolution in the House of Representatices, on the 20th ult.:

Resolved, That the thanks of Congress and the country are due to President Lincoln for removing Major General Butler from a military command. Tabled – 97 to 48.

Those voting to lay on the table, and thus refuse to endorse the President, are all republicans. Who are “loyal” now?

 ——————–

Shockingly Abused.

            If there is any State in these disunited States that deserves favor and commendation it is surely the State of Illinois. She has answered every call made upon her for volunteers without delay. She has actually furnished more men for the war than called upon. Unfortunately the men who have had her interests in charge have been neglectful of their own duty and her interests. They have permitted her citizens to be gobbled up by the general government and by other States, without an endeavor to procure the proper credits. We are convinced that if the State officials had done their duty, Illinois could be proved to have done hers without a draft. Upon this subject the State Register says:

The quota of the State of Illinois under the call for 300,000 men is set down at 35,541. – This enormous aggregate is entirely incorrect. The precise figures cannot, as yet, be ascertained, but we have reason to believe that Illinois would not be called upon for a man, if justice is done her. We are pleased to learn that Gov. Oglesby and Adjutant General Haynie are now engaged in adjusting the real deficit (if any there be), and the Governor has already dispatched, or will dispatch, an agent to the war authorities at Washington, to ascertain the true condition of this important matter. It should not be that our State, which has always promptly responded to every call, should now unjustly be declared deficient.

This is, no doubt, the actual state of affairs. Illinois has furnished her full quota of men. She has been imposed upon by the “intense loyalty” of her officers and the cupidity of other States, whose agents are endeavoring to ride a willing horse to death. Let us have justice. Iowa is out of the draft. Her Governor attended to his duty. Massachusetts is out of the draft. She had men at home faithful to her interests and influence at Washington. Let Governor Oglesby see that justice is done to Illinois.

 ——————–

Repealed.

            The black laws of Illinois, which were enacted simply to enforce a provision of the Constitution prohibiting the immigration and settlement of negroes in this State, have been repealed by the Legislature. The bill of repeal passed each house by a strict party vote – every republican voting for it and every Democrat voting against it. In the house an amendment was offered Mr. Wike, submitting the question of repeal to a vote of the people of the State; it was rejected by the republicans. There is now nothing to prevent thousands of idle, dissolute, and criminal negroes, which been turned loose by the war, from filling up the state, corrupting society, and becoming additional burdens upon the people. This is the legitimate tendency of the republican party.

 ——————–

            → We see a bill introduced into the Legislature “for the protection of growing fruit.” We hope it will pass, and our fruit be protected from frost and worms, as well as rapacious boys.

 ——————-

            ‒ The first decision of Chief Justice Chase, in the supreme court of the United States, was that West Virginia is legally a State. The decision was given on the question of placing the name of that State on the list when calling the docket.

 ——————-

To Subscribers.

            In the sale of this office it has been arranged that Mr. Hungate will furnish The Eagle to all subscribers who have paid in advance of this time up to the full period for which they have so paid. All debts due on subscription will be paid to him.

 ——————–

Administrators, Executors,

and others, indebted to me for job work or advertising are notified that payment must be made without delay. My business must be settled up at once. Nelson Abbott.

 ——————–

            → Volunteers from this county will get well paid.

County bounty  ……………………………   $300
Government “   ……………………………      100
One year’s wages …………………………      132
Clothing       ………………………………….    150

$742

Making a total of $742 a year and boarded. There are a dozen clerks in this town who ought to go and let that number of women have employment.

 ——————–

            → Another illustration of the criminallity of permitting children to play with firearms occurred in this city last Saturday. Charles and George Chapman – aged ten or twelve years, and not related, – were at the house of Mr. Franklin, with other children. George took with him a loaded revolver, and pointed it at several of the children successively, pretending or “playing shoot.” When pointing it towards Charles, the weapon was discharged, the ball striking him on the lower part of the left breast. Fortunately for the boy a few copper cents fastened with a ring, was in his pocket, and the ball striking these glanced off, leaving him uninjured, but stretched on the floor by the concussion. The coppers saved him from instant death. It is proper to say that Mr. and Mrs. Franklin were not at home, or such “playing” would not have been indulged in.

 ——————–

            → We have received two numbers of the Bushnell Union Press, the new loyal paper established at Bushnell, in this county. It is well printed, and presents a very fair appearance. The editor is a man of large experience, mature judgment, great intellectual ability, and fixedness of purpose. We have heretofore given him our good wishes, and we repeat them now. The only obstacle that looms up in his path to greatness and glory is “county seat on the brain.” If he survives this, all other “loyal” journals will soon pale their intellectual fires before his transcendant effulgence.

 ——————–

            Donation Visit. – A few of the personal friends of Rev. P. Albrecht, pastor of the Catholic church in this city, made him a donation visit on Saturday evening last, at his rooms at Brown’s Hotel. Mr. J. H. Hungate, on the part of the donors, presented rhe reverend father with a purse of $54, as a token of their regard for him as a citizen and a christian. Mr. Albrecht accepted the sum, not, as he said for his own benefit, but for the relief, as far as the sum would go, of the poor of the city. After an hour or so spent in social conversation, the company dispersed.

 ——————–

            Lumber! Lumber!! – It has often been a matter of conjecture with our country readers as to whether there was a lumber yard in Macomb. We at last have the gratification to announce that we have one, and a good one, too; where can be obtained lumber of all kinds of the very best. We refer to the yard of H. R. Bartleson, near the south-east corner of the square. Persons wanting lumber should not fail to give him a call.

 ——————–

            → We understand that quite a number of young men of this town and vicinity intend to put $300 in their pockets and don “the blue.” Before they go, however, it is the intention of our citizens to give them an oyster supper at John Abell’s saloon, on the west side of the square.

 ——————–

            → The Hutchinson Family will give a concert at Campbell Hall, in this city, on the 14th instant. The Hutchinsons are distinguished vocalists, and we predict for them a large and well pleased audience.

 ——————–

Notice.

            The Ladies of the Universalist Society of this city, will hold a festival at Campbell’s Hall, on Wednesday and Thursday evenings, March 1st and 2nd. No pains will be spared to make it a pleasant occasion.

 ——————–

Citizens Tax Meeting.

            The citizens of Macomb will hold a meeting at Campbell’s Hall, Saturday evening at 7 o’clock, to consider the propriety of repealing the law exempting them from county taxes. Let every body attend and have the subject fully and freely discussed and considered.

 

∗Editor’s Note: The original list of Democratic legislators was encased in a black border.  Due to the constraints of technology, I have had to copy them here in bold face.

February 4, 1865

Macomb Eagle

An Important Embassy.

            All our accounts from Washington, says the Chicago Times, concur that three distinguished gentlemen of the rebel confederacy have entered General Grant’s lines from Richmond, on their way to Washington. They are Alexander H. Stephens, vice president of the confederacy, R. M. T. Hunter, formerly United States Senator from Virginia and now a member of the confederate senate, and William B. Campbell, ex-judge of the United States supreme court and now assistant secretary of war in the confederacy. This can be none other than a peace movement, and it is probable that the embassy comes to Washington under other conditions than those of President Lincoln’s Niagara Falls manifesto. But though it be a peace movement, the public will do well not to indulge in lively expectations of immediate peaceful results from it. It is enough to hope that it will prove to be the entering wedge to ultimate peace. It is a great step in the right direction that such an embassy should be sent from Richmond and received in Washington. It is a great step in the right direction that the rebel leaders and the administration at Washington can come together and consider the question of peace. The event is the opening of a door that has been heretofore closed and barred. Let us pray that the door may not be again closed; that, whatever may be the result of the present negotiations, it will remain open for future negotiations if they be necessary.

 ——————–

The Anti-Bounty Meeting.

            The meeting on Saturday last, to oppose the giving of bounties to soldiers under the present call, was, so far as numbers were concerned, a most inglorious failure. It was called for a county meeting, and was expected to be a tremendous affair. It was supposed the advocates of the bounty would be overwhelmed by the numbers of the get-my-dollar-if-you-can men who would pour into Macomb on that day. But alas, for their expectations! There were not so many people in town as are usually to be seen on Saturday, and when the hour for the meeting arrived, the immense hall was “densely packed and filled to over-flowing” with twenty-five or thirty men! The leaders in the movement looked blank – they were dumb-founded at the “beggarly row of empty benches” which met their eyes. The scene was too ridiculous even for the sober face of old Blackburn, who raised his head long enough to wink at Col. Waters, as much as to say, “What a set of asses we are!” But having commenced the work they whistled up their courage and went through the farce of organizing, and speech-making, and appointing committees, and adopting resolutions. How cheap it is to go on paper! But we do admire the impudence of the leaders of these two dozen and a half, and we appreciate the coolness of their attempting to instruct members of the Legislature and Governor in the performance of their duty. Only think of twenty-five or thirty men coming to Macomb, on their own account merely, and without the least authority from any other person or persons, assuming to speak for and in the name of the twenty thousand people of McDonough county! Verily there will be a prodigious rise in the brass market.

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          → No drafted man, it is safe to say, will serve his year in the army, if he is able to procure a substitute or has friends enough to procure one for him. The draft last year established this fact. It is therefore idle to talk about the duty, and the patriotism, and glory of a conscript’s life. People don’t see it. The draft will fall with crushing weight upon many men who are unable to buy out and unable to leave enough to support their families in their absence. It is right and proper that those upon whom the lot does not fall should contribute to lighten the burden of those upon whom it does fall. Do we live for ourselves alone, or do we owe nothing to our neighbors?

 ——————–

            → The board of supervisors of Knox county have already made an appropriation of $300 to each volunteer or conscript under the present call, and the “Union” paper in that county calls upon the board to double the amount, for the reason that it would be entirely consistent with “their duty and patriotism.” We should like to be informed why it is that an act which is patriotism in Knox county becomes “copperheadism” in McDonough county. Will the “sage of Harvard” answer?

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“Foreign Jail-Birds.”

            At the anti-bounty meeting last Saturday one of the speakers eased himself of his pent up feelings, to the effect that “wanted all drafted men to serve out their time; that if substitutes were purchased they would be foreign jailbirds; that he didn’t want the army filled up with such soldiers, and if it were he would advise his son to desert,” etc. The man who gave utterance to these sentiments is a leading republican in this county and controls the action of their party as much, if not more, than any other one individual in the party. He no doubt spoke his honest sentiments, and his allusion to the foreign born people of our county as “jail birds” is no doubt shared by his political associates. The man was a candidate on the Lincoln ticket for representative last fall, and his name is Alexander Blackburn. – His right to speak for the republican party, and his acquaintance with their opinions, will not be impugned.

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Anti-Soldiers Meeting.

            At a meeting held at Campbell’s Hall, on the 28th, instant to consider the question of the tax proposed to be laid on the people of McDonough county, by the Board of Supervisors, to procure substitutes in the coming draft, D. R. Hamilton was called to the chair, William E. Withrow, was appointed secretary.

Col. L. H. Waters, addressed the meeting in his usual felicetous style, on the inequalities of the proposed measure. Whereupon a committee consisting of Alexander Blackburn, L. H. Waters and Frank Smith were appointed to draft resolutions expressing of the sense of the meeting.

During the absence of the committee, James M. Campbell, Esq., addressed the meeting in opposition to the tax.

The committee having returned, reported the following resolutions:

Resolved, That as citizens at home acknowledge our obligations to promote, protect ad preserve, the rights, interest and honor of the citizen soldiers in the service or have been in the service, and of their families; and that we are opposed to taxing them to aid those remaining at home to meet the requisition of their country upon them; that we therefore respectfully remonstrate against the passage of an act by our Legislature conferring the power on the board of Supervisors of McDonough county, to levy such tax; or if such law has already been passed, that we earnestly remonstrate with said Board against the exercise of the power conferred, and that the levying of such tax, as it would be a discrimination against the soldier and his family, against the widows and orphans of our lamented fellow braves, and against all that have either volunteered or by drat, or by substitute, met the calls made upon them, and in favor of those who have yet not met such calls – therefor, offensive, unjust and oppressive.

2nd, That we recommend to the citizens of each township to form volunteering associations and to give liberally to procure volunteers to fill their respective quotas; and should this fail to procure the requisite number, then to aid the drafted men with an equal liberality, not to procure substitutes but to go themselves at the call of their country.

2d, That we do not view being drafted as a calamity befalling a citizen, but as an honorable call upon him by his government, to which in all ordinary cases he should in person, cheerfully respond, notwithstanding it may subject him to many hardships and inconveniences, and that we do most heartily recommend a liberal patriotic and brotherly aid to all such from them that are permitted to remain at home in society and prosperity, procured for them by the government and the soldier.

4th, That a copy of these proceedings signed by the President and Secretary be furnished by said secretary, to each of the newspapers in this county for publications, in their next issues. That Alexander Blackburn, John Cummings, W. E. Witherow, be a committee to provide a like copy to our representative and senator in the State Legisature, and that James M. Campbell, L. H. Waters and Frank Smith, be a committee to represent this meeting before the Board of Supervisors of McDonough county, at their called meeting for Feb.6th, 1865, next ensuing.

On motion the resolutions were unanimously adopted, with the power in the committees to fill vacancies.

On motion adjourned.

W. E. Withrow, Secretary,
D. R. Hamilton, Chairman.

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            Out Again. – The county birdcage, called by courtesy a jail, was perforated again on Monday night last, and two of the birds therein confined escaped. One of these was Owen Manion, held to answer an indictment for murder, ad the other was Erastus Hart, alias George Smith, imprisoned for horse stealing. The latter escaped in November last, but he was caught and committed again. A hole was cut through the iron lining of the jail and then the brick wall offered but little resistance.

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“There was a tall young oysterman,
Who dwelt down by the river side,”

and he was very successful in his business, fishing up an immense quantity of the best oysters that ever tickled a hungry palate. – He was kept busy and prospered exceedingly, for his oysters were sent to the Farmers’ Aid Society in Macomb, where John Abell superintends the serving them out to hungry customers. Call on him when you are hungry.

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            Read the Advertisements. – Before you go to make purchases, read the advertisements of the newspapers. The man who advertises liberally is a liberal dealer, and can afford to sell cheaper than those who do not advertise, from the fact those who advertise freely have done and are doing a larger amount of business than any others in this place; consequently, they are able to sell cheaper than the old fogies who hide their light under a bushel.

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            → Postmasters are obliged to receive all Treasury notes for stamps and postage, if clearly genuine, no matter how torn or defaced they may be, providing one-twentieth part thereof be not missing, and fractional currency, if not one-tenth part be missing. These mutilated or defaced notes, they are to send to Washington to be retired from circulation.

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A Card from Mr. Smith.

Macomb, Jan. 31, ’65.

            Mr. Editor: I have been informed that at the meeting held on Saturday last, composed of persons opposed to levying a tax for bounties for volunteers and drafted men, that “Frank Smith” was appointed one of the committee on resolutions and also to present a copy of the same to the board of supervisors. Now, if I am the person alluded to, I wish to say that my name was used without my knowledge or consent, and respectfully decline the honor of acting in the position assigned me. On the contrary I believe it is nothing but just and right that the board should make such appropriation as is necessary to procure volunteers to fill the quota of out county, or aid drafted men in procuring substitutes.

Yours with respect,                                                                             L. F. SMITH.

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Agricultural Meeting.

            There will be a meeting held in Macomb, on Monday, February 6th, for the purpose of making arrangements for holding the next annual county fair. It is hoped that there will be a large attendance from the country, of all who are interested in the welfare of the McDonough County Agricultural Society.

Jos. Burton, Pres.

F. B. Kyle, Sec’y.

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MARRIED.

            At the residence of the bride’s father, on the 1st inst., by the Rev. J. H. Nesbit, Mr. C. F. Wheat and Miss M. A. Chandler.

The printers’ blessing attend this most happy match! May the sunshine be ever bright and golden on their heads and their pathway garlanded with all the joyous realizations which bless the dreams of love’s young hope.

January 28, 1865

Macomb Eagle

Opposing the Bounty.

            We understand that a meeting has been called for Macomb township, on Saturday, to express opposition to the proposed bounty to volunteers and conscripts. We do not know positively who are the originators of this movement, but we have reason to believe that they are men who have opposed all adjustment of the troubles from the beginning; who have voted for the war to begin and voted for it to continue; who have rejoiced at the failure of all attempts to put an end to the strife on terms honorable to both parties; and who have had no tears to shed over the frightful loss of life the war has entailed. They have called for the last man and the last dollar to fight out this war, and now when there is a prospect of a few of their dollars being called for, they attempt to get up meetings to manufacture a public opinion that will serve their individual interests. By appropriating a liberal bounty the drafted men may be enabled to purchase negro substitutes, and thus be saved to their families and the community. Is it not better to keep the young and able-bodied men of McDonough at home, to perform their accustomed labor in the workshops and fields, and let the negroes fill the graves, if graves must be filled? And yet there are men clamoring to spend the last dollar, who are whining piteously at the prospect of paying out the first dollar to keep their white neighbors at home. They say too that negroes make as good or better soldiers than white men. Why not, then, send these to the army, and keep our friends with us? Why not spend the dollars first and save the men to the last?

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Their Inconsistency.

            Our radical opponents during the past presidential canvass, were continually denouncing the policy advanced by the Democracy, of “exhausting all the resources of statesmanship practiced by civilized nations, and taught by the traditions of the American people, consistent with the honor and interests of the Union to secure peace and re-establish the Union.” Such a course was held by them to be coqueting with treason, “making a dishonorable peace,” &c., but yet we now see those very same gentlemen playing the role of peace makers. Greeley is a peace maker, Blair is another, even Singleton, of Peoria peace meeting memory, is called into action, and white winged messengers of peace are as plenty as blackberries in August. How all these peace movements may result, we know not, but we certainly do know, that the Democracy received the censure, the abuse, the calumny, vilification and slander of the radicals during the entire presidential campaign, for simply proposing to do what those very worthies are now themselves very wisely doing. Verily the world moves, and so does radicalism.

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Sherman to the Georgians.

            A few days since we commented on on a letter written by General Sherman to a prominent citizen in Georgia, in which an incorrect telegraphic dispatch made him say that Georgia was out of the union, and that reconstruction was therefore appropriate. The letter in full shows that this was just the opposite of what he asserted. He says “Georgia is not out of the union, and therefore the talk of ‘reconstruction’ appears inappropriate.” The telegraph may have unintentionally made the slight change necessary to represent the general as saying exactly what he did not say. The “loyalty” of the operator who first transmitted the dispatch may have suggested the propriety of amendment, or it may have been suggested by the war department, which is notoriously fertile in expedients for amending telegrams. Be this as it may, we are glad to have the opportunity afforded us for correcting the injustice we did the general in commenting upon the imperfect dispatch. The letter is entirely consistent, and we doubt not will commend itself to every conservative man. General Sherman, in his correspondence with Hood and the mayor of Atlanta, unequivocally asserted that he was fighting simply for the union. He substantially repeats the statement in the letter to a citizen of Georgia, and thus gives evidence that the man who has been most efficient in overthrowing the military power of the rebellion is firmly opposed to the ultra and revengeful purpose declared by the ruling party to be the object of the war. Good for Sherman. The common sense and patriotism which have so largely contributed to his success as a general have also given him clear conceptions of just civil policy. – Chicago Times.

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Proposed Convention to amend the State Constitution.

Correpsondence of the Chicago Times.

Springfield, Ill., Jan. 23.

            A bill was introduced on Friday last coming from the republican side of the house – I do not recall from what individual member – providing for the call of a convention to amend the Constitution. I understand that, although this measure has not been discussed in caucus, it will probably be carried through, if possible, by the republican majority.

Perhaps is is as well that the people of Illinois should now have a full and fair opportunity of deciding whether they will consent to having the negro made their full political equal, as abolitionism has long since, so far as it possessed the power, made him their social equal. In the election of members to a convention designed to alter the fundamental law of the State, the issue would be quite clear and simple between the Democratic and abolition candidates. It would be whether the word “white” should be stricken out of the constitution, and the right of suffrage, which is now nearly the only privilege of which they are deprived, extended to negroes.

Step by step, since it attained to power, has the republican party marched on to the goal of radical abolitionism. The Democratic orators and journals, ten years ago predicted the several advances that would be made in the principles and demands of that party, which have each and all been verified as absolutely as the prophecies of Holy Writ. From the first modest demand that slavery should not be extended over the territories, they have passed the successive barriers of abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia; then in every State in the Union; then of organizing a negro army; finally of breaking down all obstacles to the immigration of negroes into the State, of allowing them to serve on juries, and to testify against white men; and now the crowning consummation of their schemes is approached – the removal of the last political distinction between the races, so as to allow the negro the highest and grandest privilege of a freeman, the right to vote and hold office.

The action of the republican majority in this legislature has already sufficiently indicated their intentions to repeal the statute laws passed in pursuance of the positive mandates of the constitution – ratified four years ago by over a hundred and fifty thousand popular majority – which prevent the immigration of emancipated contrabands into Illinois, and disqualifying them from testifying or serving on juries in the trial of white men. Were it in their power, they would assuredly remove every barrier, and, by legislative action, extend them the right of suffrage: but that, under the present constitution, is impossible, and they accordingly desire a convention which will be empowered to finish the nefarious work they propose to begin in the general assembly and which nearly every abolition newspaper of the state has openly applauded. I say, perhaps it is well that the people of Illinois should now have the opportunity deliberately to decide whether they are willing to accept these dicta of abolitionism, and gratify the desires of Wendell Phillips and Garrison, the controlling spirits of the republican party, have always been seeking to realize – the elevation of the negro to the level of the white race. For my part, I entertain no fear of the result. Illinois, at least, is not yet abolitionized nor prepared to sanction the course pursued by the republican representatives in this general assembly, who are attempting to enact measures for which they were not sent by their constituents. If the people have not discovered the real purpose and ends of the abolition party, after the full and open disclosure of their hands in this legislature, the case, I admit, is hopeless, and the United States afford only another example of a people who were “given over to believe a lie and be destroyed.”

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            Not a Safe Place. – A young friend of ours, having a few surplus greenbacks, put away about $250, in what he supposed was a safe place of deposit, where no thief could find or steal them. But a destroyer that he had not counted upon found the secret place, and on looking at his treasure the other day, what was his dismay to find a matronly mouse domiciled among his greenbacks, and a lot of juvenile mice feeding on dainty bits of fives, tens and twenties. One half the sum had literally disappeared, probably having gone the way of all mouse rations, and of the remainder a large circle was cut out of the center and lower side of each bill, leaving about two-thirds of each note intact.

Moral. – Lay not up your greenbacks where mice can eat them.

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            Sugar from Corn. – The Chicago Times of Friday last has a long article on the manufacture of sugar, and a description of a process by which this commodity can be made from corn. The process is one perfected by Mr. Hirsh, and a company is organized to begin the work on an extensive scale. The corn is first ground, then made into starch, the starch made into dextrine, the dextrine into sirup, and the sirup into sugar. The process is very delicate and requires much care in all its stages. Experiments have demonstrated that one hundred pounds of corn will yield sixty pounds of sugar or seventy of sirup fit for table use. Cane sugar is two and a half times sweeter than corn sugar.

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            → We direct attention to the advertisement of Mr. Wells, who has opened a lumber yard at Bardolph. He will take a great deal of the trade which has heretofore come to Macomb, unless the lumber men here imitate his example and make a more liberal investment in printing ink than they have heretofore done.

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            → We stated two or three weeks ago that Dr. Dungan had sold out, with the intention of moving to Minnesota. This, we are glad to learn, is a mistake. The doctor has no desire to sell his home, farm, or leave McDonough county. He has, however, a tract or two of land that he will sell to a cash purchaser.

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            No Credits. – Provost marshal general Fry states that no credits will be allowed any district, on the approaching draft, except for enlistments made after the 19th day of December, 1864. So that Macomb, and Prairie City, and Blandinville, and Tennessee, may prepare to be “pulled” as well as the other townships.

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            → We understand that Mr. J. B. Cummings intends going to Bushnell for the purpose of engaging in the banking and exchange business. Bushnell is a thriving town and a large business is transacted there, and will no doubt furnish an exchange office with a paying custom.

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            → The Lewistown Democrat says that five horse thieves – “gay and festive cusses” – are in jail in that town. They ought to be allowed a good season for “revelry” at Joliet.

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            → The people of Iroquois county have again become dissatisfied with the location of their county seat and will vote next spring to remove it to Watseka.

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            → The weather this week has been about as cold as people of this latitude desire. It is, however, dry, invigorating, and healthful.

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            → A special meeting of the board of supervisors is called for the 6th day of February next.

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            → We see that Mr. Wike, representative from Pike county introduced a bill for “fixing the time of holding courts” in this judicial district, and that the bill has passed both houses. Probably the time for holding court in this county may be changed so as to benefit some person living in Pike county, though we think the action of Mr. Wike in the matter, rather premature, to say the least. It would, no doubt, be just as well for our representatives to consult the wishes of the people in some matters, before legislating for them. – Mt. Sterling Record.

So say we. We do not know whether the bill proposes changing the time of holding the courts in McDonough county; but if it does, it will surely fail to give the satisfaction which the present law does.

January 27, 1865

Macomb Journal

The Copperheads of McDonough County at their Old Tricks.

            It is ascertained that our copperhead Board of Supervisors are playing at their old tricks. They are said to have a law nearly matured at Springfield, to tax the people of this county to furnish substitutes for all who may be drafted in this county. Few men see the secret iniquity of this scheme in its blackness. No man with a grain of observation will fail to remember that when a very small sum was requested to help the families of volunteers, these scaly dogs invariably opposed it. But now we are told they wish to furnish substitutes for all who may be drafted. The real Union men of both parties, who could at all conveniently enter the army, have long ago went to the war like men, and are doing service to the country. Now when these sneaks find they must go, they seek exemption at other men’s expense.

At the last draft, substitutes cost $1,000 each, and our quota was over two hundred. The coming draft, and the price of substitutes will not be much unlike the past, both as to price and numbers of men. This would make the cost to McDonough county $200,000, if the whole amount of substitutes pay be raised by the county; and in proportion, if a part only be raised, even the one tenth of it, a pretty sum to pay for the cowardice and meanness of the men who manage county matters, for the enrollment of their friends alone. Ask the Solons to make this equal by paying the two thousand men who have already gone alike share, making the amount $4,000,000 for whole substitutes, and in proportion for a less bounty, and they meanly refuse. But when the draft in turn takes these stay at home dogs, they want the people indiscriminately to bear the tax and save their precious bodies.

Now consider the extreme inequality of this measure. A. B. goes to war and spends three years of the prime of his life, and perhaps comes home with a broken constitution, or looses a limb, or perhaps dies or is killed; he receives nothing but the $100 bounty from the government and his monthly pay. But after serving out his time or loosing his life, he or his friends perhaps, as long as they live, pay a county tax to keep C. D. and others from going at all. Or still another case: A, is the father of a family, two of his sons volunteer and go to the war or are drafted. The third one, or he himself is again drafted, and he pays $1,000 to get a substitute; but after all of this, he has to pay to accommodate this copperhead tribe, a burdensome, if not a crushing tax, as long as he lives, to prevent B, a worthless traitor to his country at heart, from going at all. Such scandalous legislation would disgrace the Feegees. And then the enormity of the taxes we now pay, renders the measure still more serious. It would quadruple our present taxes.

The pitiful and cowardly argument which is used to gull the ignorant is this: are not the lives of our citizens worth more than money, and is it not better that every citizen should bear this burden equally, than that one, or a few men bear it all? Now this is specious, but in the mouths of those who now use it, it is as mean as it is specious. It is not true that one man’s life or several men’s lives in defence of the very country that gives them a home and protection, are better than the money of widows and orphans, or old men or women, or soldiers who have already honorably defended their country in person, so that we boldly deny the proposition, and every high minded honorable man would scorn to tax this large class who compose so much of any community, to save his own head.

In every nation there are some who must fight. We have no royal or aristocratic exempts in this free land; but in his turn, and at a certain age, every man owes military service to the government, which reared and defends him. In this duty high minded men wish not to evade their turn, but fight or hire a substitute. In all governments from the old Roman down to our own, the doctrine “Dulcis est pro patria moriri,” (it is sweet to die for one ones country,) has been deemed a true and honorable saying. But the skulking set we are now attempting to expose would tax their grand-mothers of the revolutionary period, rather than expose their sickly manhood. There are some duties in society, that require men, not money, and the vain attempt to substitute money for men in any government must lead to national bankruptcy. Furnishing substitutes is only right in theory, when the drafted man has either a good domestic excuse, or is constitutionally infirm. If this war tax this county $200,000, why may not another one with France tax us in 1868, with as much more, and one with some other country as much more, in 1870, and so without end.

We trust the people will ventilate this mean copperhead measure, and not let the whelps who were so lately arming themselves and their neighbors against the government, now skulk out of their liabilities, by using the people’s money, to purchase their exemption. That a lot of skulks should climb into power and then use their neighbor’s money to purchase their own exemption at such a time is supreme infamy.

And withal, Nelson Abbott of the Eagel, that brid which has croaked rebellion all day long, and every day since the rebellion commenced; who has cried out taxation; been for and against drafting, as it would favor the south; who counselled resistance, when he hoped Democracy would win – even he, now that his party has sank into infamy, wishes the men he has traduced to pay his war tax, and the widows of the men, whose husbands he has scarce even noticed, to contribute to find him a substitute. Oh! shame.

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The Peace Movement!

            We have nothing very late to record about the peace movements that are now agitating the country, both north and south. Blair has gone on a second mission to Richmond, but what it will amount to is hard to tell. One thing is certain – the public mind appears ready to receive the news of peace at any time. Everybody is anxious for peace, and we have no doubt but our authorities are doing all they can to secure it. With a few more such peace bulletins as Grant, Sherman, Sheridan, Terry, Thomas and Porter have been sending to the rebels lately, we believe the thing will be accomplished. We must possess our souls with patience for a short time, and we will come out all right.

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A “Jolly Time.”

            We see by our Fulton county exchanges that the inhabitants thereof are having a good old time of it there this Winter – bushwhacking, knocking down, dragging out, gouging, pummeling one another freely. Dickens’ “Micawber,” or some other man was continually on the hunt of some place where he could be “jolly under depressing circumstances.” If he, “or any other man” will go to Fulton county, we will guarantee that the “depressing circumstances” can be found there in glorious profusion. Go it Fultonians, we admire your taste in getting up little, exciting by plays of the big fight. If you enjoy it, nobody should object.

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            Supervisors’ Meeting. – We insert, in another column, a call for a meeting of the Board of Supervisors for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of levying a tax to raise money to pay bounties and hire substitutes for those who shall be drafted next month.

We hope the Board will have the good sense to see that it will be wrong to do anything of the king and act accordingly.

 ——————

            Proposed Celebration.

The Odd Fellows of this city propose celebrating the anniversary of Washington’s birthday – the 22nd of February – by a procession and supper. A good idea. We will have further to say on the subject as the time approaches.

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            Police Court.

It is not often that our small city can afford enough police items to make it interesting to our readers to have them reported in the papers, but this week appears to be an exception. It seems that the cold weather that we have had for the last week has had the effect of causing the people to “crook their elbow” oftener than usual, and our city fathers, instead of following the example of other cities, have the sellers of the ardent arrested, instead of the consumers. The following are the cases for the first three days of this week.

Peter Hirsh was up before his honor Judge Chandler, on Wednesday, for violating the liquor ordinance, and after a hearing before twelve “good and true” men, was acquitted. Lucky Peter.

Jim Haley, a person with whom ‘Squire Withrow is quite intimate, at least they are often together at the ‘Squire’s office, appeared at the aforesaid office at the instigation of the Marshal, and after the usual interesting ceremonies, loaned the city thirty dollars. Unlucky “Jim.”

G. F. Clark was brought up under three different charges for the same offense selling liquor – and confessed to the same. He was let off by paying the sum of ninety dollars into the city treasury. Not very good on Clark.

The next was a gentleman of the German persuasion, August J. Brawl by name, same offense. His coffers were depleted to the tune of thirty dollars and costs.

August J. Brawl, spoken of above, was again brought up shortly after the former ceremony, for the grievous offense of an assault on the person of Thomas Johnson, and [?] in the sum of three dollars and costs. Very unlucky Brawl.

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Hay Business in Macomb.

It will be three years this coming spring since Messrs. Watkins & Co., erected their hay press in this city and in that time it has become one of the institutions of the city. There are but few citizens, who are aware of the extent of the business at the present time, and we propose, in this article, to give a few items concerning it. Before the time spoken of, there was but very little hay raised in this county – hardly enough for home consumption, and the price was so low that farmers did not care to raise it for sale. For a number of years the average price per ton was $5, and at that rate it scarcely paid the farmer to secure it. Since the hay press has been in operation here, our farmers are turning their attention to the raising of more hay, and at the present time our county raises as much hay as any county of the same extent in the State. Watkins & Co’s press has a capacity of turning out fifty bales per day ten hours each, averaging 400 lbs. to the bale. They employ ten hands and five teams this winter, but are going to increase this force in the spring. They buy most of the hay they press on the farms of the producers, paying an average price of $10 per ton. They have shipped the since the 1st of last September over 1000 tons, which gives the nice little sum of $10,000 to the farmers, in the immediate neighborhood of the city. The coming month is the time, we believe, to sow timothy, and we would advise our farmers to put it in, not that they can be sure of a ready sale at a largely remunerative price.

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            Exciting Trial. – Quite an exciting trial was held before Judge Chandler on Monday last, about the ownership of a colt. Messrs. Hunter and Crabb, each claimed to be the rightful owner of the colt, and they brought witnesses to prove the justice of their claim. The witnesses of each side swore, most of them positively, that they were well acquainted with the colt in question, all the peculiar marks about it, & C., and that Mr. Crabb, or Mr. Hunter, was the owner thereof.

The jury decided, as Mr. Hunter had the majority of the witnesses, that the colt was his, and rendered their verdict accordingly.

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Musical.

A singing school, under the direction of Prof. G. K. Hall, is in progress in this city.

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The Hay Scales.

The hay scales of this city are situated on the south side of the square, some little west of directly opposite the celebrated photograph gallery of Hawkins & Philpot, who take pictures in all sorts of weather, and never fail to give satisfaction. As soon as Messrs. H. & P. gets into their new rooms you all can enjoy the sight a “Western rush.” Better go and get your photographs before they are crowded too much.

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The Business of Macomb.

For some time past we have had it in contemplation to write an article on the business prospects of Macomb, but have not been enabled to obtain the necessary statistics, and at present we will merely glance at that which can readily be seen by strangers and citizens, and which cannot be gainsaid by anyone. We have a set of very enterprising, energetic business men, as will be acknowledged by glancing at our advertising columns, who attract a very large trade here. Since the war our trade has more than doubled, and with a fair prospect of a still further increase the coming season. We have twelve dry goods store, two woolen stores, three clothing stores, ten grocery stores, two hard and tinware and stove stores, two bakeries and confectionaries, three oyster saloons, two exclusive confectioneries, two banks of exchange, two silver smiths and watch makers, two book and stationery store, one [?] store, one marble tomb-stone factory, three drug houses, three lumber yards, three livery stables, two steam flouring mills, two steam saw mills, two large and commodious hotels, five or six private boarding houses, two flour and feed depots, two printing offices, three photograph galleries, one steam woolen factory and carding machine, two furniture stores, five millinery and dress making establishments, two cabinet shops, five carpenter shops, one steam plow factory, one iron foundry, three agricultural warehouses, three boot, shoe, hat and cap stores, one tobacconist and cigar factory, seven boot and shoe shops, two saddle and harness shops, three wagon and carriage shops, seven blacksmith shops, one gunsmith, three meat markets, one extensive pump factory, two paint shops, one broom factory, and two sewing machine agencies. Of the professionals, we have five pastors of churches, eight lawyers, twelve physicians, three dentists, four male and seven female teachers. We have seven organized churches – to-wit: – Methodist, Baptist, Christian, Presbyterian (old school) Cumberland Presbyterian, Catholic and Universalist. – The pastors of which are, in the order names, Revs. J. H. Rhea, J. O. Metcalf, J. C. Reynolds, J. H. Nesbitt, J. Stapp, P. Albright and I. M. Westfall.

If we have omitted any branch of business we would thank our friends to inform us, and will gladly make the correction.

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Going to Remove.

The enterprising firm of Watkins & Co., grocers, announce, that they will remove into their large, new brick building about the first of February. – Do not wait, though, for them to move before purchasing your groceries, as they have a large stock still on hand at their old stand in the Randolph block.

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Bobbing Around.

While “bobbing around” the other day, in search of items, we casually dropped into the dry goods store of Geo. W. Bailey, on the east side of the square, and while there, talking of the prospect for peace, the fall in the price of gold, &c., George informed us that dry goods were falling also – that he was selling good prints for 33 1/3 cts per yard, and the best heavy sheetings at 60 cts., and other gods in proportion. We are perfectly satisfied that George is selling cheaper than any other house in town, and with “Uncle Billy” and “Wash.” as assistants, he is bound to have a large share of the trade.

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Resigned.

Capt. Alex. Chapman, late of Co. B 16th Ill. V. V. Inft., has resigned his commission in the army, and is now at home.

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Come at Last.

The cold weather that we have been looking for so long has eventually come, and we are now having “weather as it weather,” in other words, it is as cold as “Greenland’s icy mountains and India’s coral strand.”

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            Runaway. – On Tuesday last, a team composed of a horse and a mule, started from somewhere near Tinsley’s mill, and made good time through our streets. In the run they dropped the wagon bed and the hind wheels between the top of the hill and the square, where they finally brought up without further damage.

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            → Although the holidays are said to be over, yet a nice present to wife or friend will not come amiss even at the present time. A few more nice books and Albums left at Clarke’s Book store, and new ones received nearly every day.

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            Valentines. – S. J. Clarke & Co. have just received a large stock of comic and sentimental valentines, which they will dispose of cheap. They have them ranging in price from 5 cts to $12 and nice enough to tempt the heart of the most obdurate young lady living – Squibbob says he is going to buy one, and we would advise all other young men to do likewise.

January 21, 1865

Macomb Eagle

→ The Senate on the 10th very properly refused to pass an appropriation of six thousand dollars for ex-Governor Joseph A. Wright, of Indiana, as a reimbursement for his expenses in Europe during the early part of the war. It came out during the debate that Mr. Wright was dispatched on this agricultural mission by the President; but for once this argument, which had been so potent with republican legislators for the past four years, failed. Even Mr. Sumner declared that the President had no right to make such an appointment, and then ask Congress to appropriate money for the expenses of the appointee. Under ordinary circumstances, we might consider this a hopeful sign; but considering the wanton waste of the public money by the men now in power, we strongly suspect that if this Peter has been robbed some Paul will be well [fold].

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            → Wendell Phillips made a speech in New York last week in which he took the position that “reconstruction is disaster.” The constitution was dead. The southern States must be annihilated, and a new constitution formed that is blind to color, &c – Phillips said some startling things three years ago, but to-day they are adopted as measures of the administration. He is but a few months, if any, ahead of the party in power now in the above enunciations.

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            → The evidences thicken that Gen. Grant is the setting sun and Gen. Sherman the rising luminary. A proposition has already been submitted to Congress to make provision for the appointment of another Lieut. General. This is intended for Gen. Sherman. – Gen. Grant’s laurels have got cold. – He has been fighting on one line about long enough, and now it is time for another person to try.

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            → The Czar of Russia writes to the Emperor Maximilian congratulating him upon his advent to the Mexican throne. France and England will probably do the same thing, and then good-bye to the “Monroe doctrine.”

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            What Sherman says on Slavery. – From a gentleman who has had several consultations with Gen. Sherman recently, the Augusta Constitutionalist learns he says slavery will exist in the South after the conclusion of peace, let the war terminate as it may; that Lincoln’s proclamations in reference to its abolition are simply means for the restoration of the Union; that the supreme court have not, nor will not sustain him; neither will the federal government attempt to abolish slavery, but will leave it to the States returning to the Union to settle it; and that he (Sherman) expects to own a thousand slaves in the South one of these days. He represents Sherman as being a thorough fanatic upon the subject of restoring the “glorious Union.” – Richmond Whig, Dec. 30th.

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            ‒ The prospects of a “white mans colony,” to settle in Mexico, capital 50 shares of $100 each, dated Aug. 1, 1864, specially excluding any negro, Mongolian, or abolitionist is being circulated in San Francisco.

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Bethel Township.

            At a meeting held at the Bethel school house, on the 14th of January 1865, Samuel Calvin was called to the chair and Wm. Gunning appointed secretary.

A motion to appoint a committee of seven to report resolutions expressive of the sense of the meeting was adopted.

The chair appointed Wm. Twaddle, Sam’l Wilson, Leonard Norton, A. H. Rush, W. J. Horrell, J. P. Clark, and J. Holliday, who reported the following:

Resolved, That J. Sullivan, Esq., chairman of the board of supervisors, be requested to convene the board at the earliest practical period, and that said board when convened be requested to appropriate such sum of money, to be paid out of the county treasury, as will, in connection with the bounty paid by the United States and the State of Illinois, procure volunteers to fill the quota for McDonough county.

SAM’L CALVIN, ch’n.
Wm. Gunning, sec.

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            Doing A Merchant. – It is generally supposed that our merchants are sharp enough to look after their own interests, and they are. But an exception to the rule occurred last Saturday, which we feel bound to make a note of. A countryman (in appearance at least) stopped at Strader & Co’s store and enquired for boots; he looked over the stock, but found none to suit him. He went out saying he would look elsewhere. About dark he came back, again looked over the boots, and at last pulled on a pair of custom made, which he thought he would do. Then he wanted shoes for his wife, and while looking for these would occasionally step to the door to “look after his horses.” Finally he found shoes to suit his wife, and while they were being wrapped up took one more look at the horses, thought they were “getting loose and must go fasten them.” He went, and from some cause forgot to return after the shoes or pay for the boots on his feet.

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            We’ll Go There Again. – Dropping into the new store of S. H. Williams, the other evening, we were agreeably surprised to find a very large stock of the best quality of goods for the winter trade. There is perhaps no other house in the county which contains so complete an assortment of dress goods, prints, domestics, and every other kind of dry goods required in the household. The price too, we are assured, is as low as any other man’s, quality and style taken in consideration. – While pleasantly admiring the tasteful display on shelves and counters, we were made the recipient of a fine hat, from the hands of Mr. Stewart, the clever salesman of the house. If this is the way Mr. W. treats “ye editor,” we hope the habit “may grow on him,” and while we intend to call frequently hereafter, we advise all our readers to do likewise.

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            Panorama of New York. – This highly attractive picture of the principal objects of interest in the city of New York, was exhibited in Macomb last Friday. A large number of our citizens attended the hall on both exhibitions, and were highly pleased with the painting. It is richly worth the small price of admission. We understand the panorama will be exhibited again next week.

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            → Long time ago the poet sung,

“Oh, she was fair,
But sorrow came and left its traces there.”

What became of the rest of the harness has never been known. However there is one thing certain – there are not traces of sorrow on the countenances of those who eat their oysters at John Abrill’s, southwest corner of the square.

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            Chalmers Township. – We are requested to state that the citizens of Chalmers will hold a meeting at Dunsworth’s school house, on Saturday 21st., to take measures in regard to the impending draft. It is hoped there will be a general attendance.

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Lewistown Amusements.

            This town of Lewistown is not a large place, nor yet a fast place; yet it has peculiarities of its own few other towns possess. For example, we are not much on parties, balls, theaters, concerts, festivals, &c. Other people enjoy these things. When some of our young men get to hankering after recreation from the toils of loafing, they string their revolvers to their waists and go a man hunting. Saturday night a few of our lively fellows went on a pleasure excursion of this sort, and in their rounds brought up at Owen Lally’s tavern, where a refreshing entertainment, consisting of shooting pistols and throwing bricks at its inmates, was served up. It was a pleasant re-union. “Hank” Harwick was in the upper story of the building, and went into the amusement with a vim that surprised his grey hairs. He shot six bullets at the outdoor quadrille, two of them taking effect in the clothes of as many cheerful young men. The party finally broke up, all participants in the greatest humor at its termination.

On Sunday about 2 o’clock a man named Harrison was accosted, as we hear it, by a couple of our gay young men, as he was riding across Main street, when a few words passed quietly about those heroes, Abraham and Jefferson, resulting in one of the aforesaid young men shooting two balls at Harrison, while the other young man made a carom on his back with a brickbat. Harrison very properly broke up that party by leaving.

On Monday night, as Mr. Wm. Beadles of Bernadotte was riding out west of Lewistown half-a-mile, he suddenly found himself a guest at one of these nice little parties. Two shots were fired at him from the brush – one going quiet through his coate and lodging in his saddle horn, and the other whistling a waltz past his head. Mr. B. did not have time to remain at the party, and the darkness, combined with the rapid traveling of his horse, prevented him from making the personal acquaintance of his would be entertainers. – Fulton Democrat.

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            ‒ Gen. McClellan will leave for Europe during the first week in February. He intends to be absent for two years.

January 14, 1865

Macomb Eagle

Subjects for Gratitude.

            It is stated that some of the admirers of Admiral Farragut are contributing to purchase a testimonial for him in the shape of a $50,000 United States bond. Also that the friends of Gen. Sherman are raising funds to purchase a homestead for him, of perhaps equal value, in Ohio. This liberality, while it is creditable as such, might be much better directed. The pay of a major general and of a vice admiral is amply sufficient to render the possessors of these offices in independent circumstances. The people who have money to be liberal with could bestow it to a much better purpose by the erection of hospitals for disabled soldiers and sailors – those noble fellows who, almost without reward, or even the desire of it – have sprinkled on the plain and on the wave that red rain from which their commanders’ laurels have grown. If we as a nation, or as individuals, shall provide a home for those disabled in the ranks, we [fold] blessing on them and do ourselves an honor. “England has her Greenwich and Chelsea Hospitals for disabled sailors and soldiers; there the relics of her great victories on land and ocean are deposited, and there the veterans whose valor and blood helped to win them find a comfortable and honorable home. We have the most powerful navy that ever floated; we have an army whose superior as a whole, the world has never seen. The invalids from both branches of the service are increasing daily by the inevitable casualties of war. Numbers of these are without relatives or friends and with no rood tree whose shelter they can claim. It is our duty as it should be our pride and pleasure to build for them dwellings worthy of their deeds and our own gratitude; dwellings set apart for all time to come to that special purpose, dedicated forever to these helpless heroes who in the storm of battle have stood by the old flag and ventured their lives in its defense. – Let us the cease to shower upon the heads of individual favorites useless offerings and devote them to a more general benevolence. Let the people present to their “boys in blue” a Greenwich and a Chelsea – we are abundantly able to give what has been so gloriously deserved.”

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            → The treasury clerks at Washington will not have their usual New Year’s present of penknives this year, and the Government will save some $8,000. The custom originated when the clerks had to mend and make their own pens, and there is no justice in it now. This is the very first item of retrenchment that we have known the Lincoln administration to make, and we hasten to record it. Eight thousand dollars is now about eight cents as compared to our former expenditures, but who knows, if the Lincoln party begin by saving eight cents, whether the habit may grow on them.

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            → Gov. Yates inflicted upon the Legislature a message making sixty-seven closely printed pages. We venture to say that it is the hugest batch of rubbish that was ever carried out of the way. Its huge proportions are nt only swelled out, but consist almost entirely of pretensions, bombast, twaddle, and negro-phobia. We do not intend to afflict the readers of this paper with it. We can only pity the clerks who had to read it, and the members who, out of courtesy, sat and listened to it.

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            → We may brag of the freedom of America, but it is nothing but brag after all. Here a man is not even mast of himself nor his own time or services. As an instance, who knows whether three months hence he will be playing his own vocation, or serving as a soldier. Old Abe disposes of us all as he likes, not as we will.

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            Horrible Infanticide. – A young Woman gives birth to a Child and then Destroys it. – The usually quiet community of Middletown was thrown into a state of intense excitement on Friday last by the discovery of the dead body of an infant. The child was found under a house occupied by Joseph Thornburg, and many were the queries as to who was its mother and who placed it there. It had apparently been dead a week or more, and must have been destroyed immediately after birth. Suspicion rested upon a young woman named Mary Long, who had been living at Thornburg’s, and she was, after an inquest on the body of the child, arrested and lodged in jail. The coroner, J. Sullivan, Esq., was sent for, and on Saturday held an inquest. Three witnesses were examined, who testified to the finding of the child under the house, and also to apparent pregnancy of the woman Long, until about two weeks previous, when the appearance of pregnancy was longer discernable. We give the testimony of John Taylor, as follows:

John Taylor sworn – I have seen a young lady called Mary Long, who lived with one Joseph Thornburg, who lately occupied a house belonging to John Hoover, on the lot adjoining the lot I now live on. I have for a long time supposed the said Mary Long was pregnant, but for the last eight or ten days I saw a great decline in the appearance of said Mary Long. I saw the appearance of a dead body under the west end of the house occupied by said Thornburg, at the time of said pregnant appearance disappearing. Said dead body was concealed under the sill of said house, wrapped in calico rags, and rocks placed about it apparently to conceal said deceased child.

John Taylor.

            The other witnesses, C. M. Purcell and Evaline Taylor testified to substantially the same facts. The jury returned the following verdict:

We the jury, after examining the body of the infant, and hearing all the testimony that could be found, find that said infant came to its death by violence inflicted by the hand of one Mary Long, whom we believe to be the mother of the child and a member of the family of Joseph Thornburg.

R. L. Horrell foremen,
John Vorhees,
J. C. Webb,
Amos Gibson,
G. B. Reed,
S. D. Wallace,
Lyman Griswold,
Richard Raffety,
G. W. Matthews,
John Farnam,
Charles Dickason,
Wm. R. Sullivan.

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            → We mentioned last week the death of a child, from burning, in Tennessee township. Since then Mr. J. J. Lower has furnished us the following particulars: The parents Charles and Mary McKinsey, went to the woodpile to get some wood, leaving the child in the sitting room, in which was a lighted candle. They were not absent over two minutes, and when they returned the candle was on the floor, the child in the kitchen with its clothes in flames. This occurred about 6 p.m. Sunday evening, and the poor sufferer died in about 24 hours. The child was about 14 months old.

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            The Largest. – We had supposed that our friend Harkrader’s big hog was the brag porker of the west; but the following from a Kansas paper, if true, is a notch or two ahead: “A hog was sold at Atchison, Kansas, the other day which weighed 1123 pounds net. It brought ten cents per pound, making the snug sum of $112.30.

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            → Real Estate transactions are pretty lively these times in this county. As a sample of how the land lies we will mention the sale of a quarter section of unimproved prairie, about two miles from town. It sold for the snug sum of $4,000. Amos Dixon was the lucky purchaser, and he considers it quite a bargain.

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            → Our worthy friend J. C. Thompson, Esq., has, it is reported, gone to Washington city. We do not know what his business is, and can only imagine one of two things: first, to join Hancock’s veteran corps, or second, to sing “John the Cooper” at Old Abe’s inauguration.

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            → The Monmouth Review says wolves are so plenty in some parts of Warren county that they even enter the farmers’ dooryards. Better hunt them out.

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            → Those oysters, hot coffee, etc., at the Farmers’ Aid Society, are very good. Go and sample a dish, or get a cold or warm lunch, and be convinced for the stomach’s sake. Kept by John Abell, south of Wolf’s meat house.

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            → Charley Wolf wants the people in town and the rest of mankind to know he is selling the best of meats, either beef or pork, in any kind of cut, at the lowest greenback rates. Call on him and see.

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