December 9, 1864

Macomb Journal

Exchanged. – We at length have the gratifying intelligence to impart to our readers, that George Hall and Frank Smith, both citizens of this city, and who have been in the hands of the rebels since the 21st of September, 1863, have been exchanged, and are once more within the Federal lines. – They were taken prisoners at the battle of Chickamauga, Ga. We look for them home soon. Lieuts. Hovey and [?] who were taken at the same time, are still, we presume, in the hands of the rebels as we have not heard whether they have been exchanged. – Morris Chase, another citizen of this county, is exchanged, and will, probably, soon be home. The boys should, and will, be heartily welcomed.

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→ We print elsewhere in this paper a communication from Jos. Burton, Esq., in answer to one from Rev. Geo. Hays, of Aurora. We hope the controversy will end with this communication, as we can see no good end that will be subterved by its continuance.

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Who will be the Lucky One? – Young man, be sure and read the advertisement of the Managers of the Sanitary Fair to be held in this city. Make a bargain with Celestina Anastasia Parthenia Tabitha, and go to the hall on the evening of the 23d, and be [?].” It will be fun – to the spectators.

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Dramatic Exhibition. – The [?] exhibitions of the Dramatic Association of this city was given on Saturday evening last, at Campbell’s Hall, before a large and appreciative audience. Nothing occurred, that we are aware of, to mar the enjoyment of either the audience or actors. The proceeds of the exhibition were donated to the United Sisters of Benevolence, of this city. We understand that the Association proposes to give another exhibition on the evening of the [?]th in which they will bring out a couple of side-splitting farces.

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→ The weather presents a winter aspect out of doors at present. The streets are pretty thoroughly macadamized with snow and mud.

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→ The price of stone coal, in this city, has ranged from 22 to 30 cts during the last two weeks. Can’t some philanthropic person propose some plan whereby this necessary article of family use be lowered in price?

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Taken Possession. – John H. Hungate, Esq., circuit clerk, elect, took possession of the office on Monday last. [?]. T. Head and R. W. Smith, Esqs., are his deputies.

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We Have Conquered. – After a number of years of trial, in which the boys and fast youths of this city always came off victorious, and carried things at public meetings pretty much their own way, the decent portion of the community have at last prevailed, and it is now demonstrated to a certainty that civil people can assemble for mutual pleasure and enjoyment without being subjected to the annoyance and insults that have prevailed so much among the afore-mentioned “boys.” Hereafter when our citizens wish to assemble at Campbell’s Hall, or other places, either for worship or recreation, they can do so without any fear of being insulted by profane or blackguard language, or deafened by hoots and yells of would-be-smart young men. All that was wanting formerly in this place to have quiet assemblages, was to give the rowdies to understand that they could not rule there – this has been done on last Saturday evening at Campbell’s Hall, and the consequence was, those who went there for enjoyment were not molested. The rowdies were mute. We will state in this connection, that hereafter, our city authorities are determined to keep good order in civil assemblages. Those who do not want to attend such places unless it is for the purpose of trying to raise a row, or to insult women had better keep away, or they will have the pleasure of being introduced to the Police Magistrate.

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            Broken Up. – The graded school, kept in the old college building, has been abandoned for the present for some cause which we have been unable to learn. There are several rumors afloat as to the cause, among which is, and we believe the correct one, the boys controlled the teacher instead of the teacher controlling the boys. It is certainly astonishing that parents will so far forget their duty as to allow their children to rule the schools of this city. It is high time those in authority should take hold of the matter, and teach the “fast youths” of this city that they shall learn to obey, while in attendance at school, the teachers of our public schools in all reasonable requirements and regulations. Another rumor is to the effect that the teacher was not qualified to teach the school. How this is we do not know, but if it is true, it is, in our opinion, rather a left-handed compliment to our worthy School Commissioner, as it is his duty to see that every teacher is duly qualified for the office, and give him, or her, a certificate of qualification and good moral character, &c. And, if we remember rightly, a resolution was passed by the city council to refuse to employ any teacher, either male or female, who could not produce a first-class certificate. Has this requirement been carried out?

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           M. Strader & Co. – On the west side of the square is a large boot and shoe, hat and cap establishment, owned by the above named firm. We have frequently called in their store, and were always well pleased to see the smiling countenances of Mike, Joe and Sam, “doing the polite” to a host of customers, who were also pleased at the bargains they received. Persons in search of the celebrated “Muscovy” boot, will find it there, besides others equally as good.

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            → T. M. Gilfry, Esq., has opened a new dry goods store at his old stand – the Grantham corner. His stock is entirely new.

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            Coffee. – In these days of high prices of everything needed in a family, it seems desirable that economy should be practiced by all. In the matter of coffee, an infinite number of substitutes have been tried by all, and as a general thing, abandoned as soon as tried. There is one article that appears to give good general satisfaction, and that is the French Breakfast Coffee. Messrs. Wadham & Stowel have the pure article for sale, and those persons who have never tried it would do well to give them a call, and procure a supply. These gentlemen not only have the French breakfast coffee, but all sorts of groceries and also cupboard ware, crockery ware, &c.

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            Presents. – The holidays are approaching; and as it is customary to give presents to friends and acquaintances. we would say that no more acceptable present could be given than a nice photograph, such as are taken by those gentlemanly artists, Messrs. Hawkins & Philpot. Rooms southeast corner of the square.

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            → A Walking Doll, a Dancing Doll, a Crying Doll, and a doll that don’t cry are among the attractions for the holidays at Clarke’s Bookstore, the headquarters of Santa Claus.

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            Snow. – “’It snows’ cries the school-boy; ‘hurrah!’ and his shout’ ‘ is echoed by the crowd that is constantly thronging the people’s favorite grocery establishment of Watkins & Co., southeast corner of the square, in the Randolph block. Groceries of the best to be found there at all times.

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            Star in the East. – “In the days of old, as we’ve been told,” the wise men saw the “Star in the East.” In the latter days, the citizens of Macomb and the surrounding country look to the east side of the square to find cheap dry goods, and they are not disappointed, for Geo. W. Baily keeps on hand a large supply of the best and cheapest goods in town. Don’t take our word for it, but go and see for yourself.

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            Wounded. – Col. L. H. Waters, of the 84th was severely wounded in the right shoulder at the late battle of Franklin, Tenn. His wife started for Nashville last Monday, as he was taken there.

We also learned that Lieut. J. G. Waters also received a slight flesh wound. These were all the casualties that occurred to any of our citizens who belong to the 84th that we could hear of.

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