June 18, 1864

Macomb Eagle

Lincoln’s Platform.

            We publish, as a matter of political information, the resolutions adopted by Lincoln’s hirelings at Balitmore. – The so-called convention was simply a shoddy assemblage, called by Abraham for performing the farce of re-nominating him. He knew his men and they knew their master. The resolutions mouth and slabber about the “Constitution and laws,” when it is known that both have been insolently and needlessly flung behind the would-be despot, whenever their wholesome restraint appeared to be in the way of his rebellious schemes. On the vital point of restoration of the Union nothing is said. To go into the contest, as Lincoln’s loyalists do, without any policy on the main question of the day, is to confess that the party is unequal to the crisis and that they intend to leave the question of restoration or separation to the chapter of accidents.

The third resolution makes a pretense of endorsing Lincoln’s proclamations, and yet virtually declares them futile and inoperative. If slavery is legally abolished by his proclamations why demand an amendment of the Constitution to abolish it? If slavery is not so abolished what honor is obtained for Lincoln for issuing them? The truth is, we suspect, the shoddyites wanted to hit and they wanted to miss. How is the Constitution to be amended until the government has declared the status of the seceded States? Are they in the Union, or do the republicans accept the rebel statement that they are out of the Union and need not be consulted in regard to the proposed amendment?

The fifth resolution “approves and applauds” the administration of Mr. Lincoln, and by so doing virtually endorses all his violations of the Constitution in his arbitrary arrests, imprisonment without warrant, punishment without seeking conviction, searches and seizures without law, the control of elections by military force, the interference with free discussion and the free exercise of religion, together with all the catologue of immense crimes which he has been guilty of toward the American people. Not having the courage to shock and brave the public feeling by an enumeration of Lincoln’s shameful proceedings, his corrupt parasites gloss them ever with the glittering generality of “measures and acts he has adopted to defend the nation against its open and secret foes.” The people are not so servile as to follow in the track of the plunderers who would lead the country to further disgrace and ruin.

“How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags,
What is’t you do?
A deed without a name!

The last resolution “approves the position taken by the government” for the maintenance of the Monroe doctrine! This is the coolest of all. – It could only be equally by shanking Banks for his success on Red river, Cameron for his honesty, a public strumpet for her virtue, or the devil for his piety. Lincoln and his party have cringed before the French Emperor and have never had the courage to make even so much as an earnest protest or issue a paper proclamation against the establishment of a monarchy in Mexico. He and they have quietly sat by and taught the European powers to laugh at the Monroe doctrine as an idle threat or a silly menace on the part of the United States, and we are, forsooth, called on to re-elect Lincoln on account of his “support” of it. Words cannot do justice to the brazen effrontery of these shameless politicians.

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            → Is Tennessee a State in the Union or out of the Union? Is secessionism a fact in reality or only in theory? If Tennessee is in the Union, why is she not represented in Congress? Why does she not have a Governor and a State Legislature elected by the people? Why is the salary of her “military governor” paid out of the United States treasury? – If Tennessee is not a State in the Union, how can A. Johnson be a candidate for Vice President? Or is his nomination another instance of the hearty devotion of the republican leaguers to the Constitution?

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Efforts for Peace.

            When this country was at war with Mexico, commissioners were sent with Gen. Scott’s army for the purpose of making a peace between the two nations. These commissioners were instructed to make continual efforts for the opening of negotiations, with the Mexican authorities, and after every battle they made overtures for this purpose. This conduct of our Government was honorable in the highest degree, and sprang from the purest motives that ever influenced the action of an administration. It is in striking contrast with the conduct of Lincoln during the present war. Not only are no commissioners sent to open negotiations, by Mr. Lincoln, but on the contrary, when commissioners or propositions come from the enemy, they are rejected without ceremony, or a refusal to learn their nature even is persisted in. The extract from the letter of Jeff. Davis to Gov. Vance, which is published elsewhere in this paper, is worthy of more than a moment’s attention. Why did not Lincoln receive the proposal of A. H. Stephens? No man can say that no good could have resulted from it; no man can say that the negotiations tendered by Mr. Stephens would not have resulted in the conclusion of peace and the restoration of the Union. Why did not Lincoln listen to the offer that Stephens came to make? We are forced to believe that it would not have suited Mr. Lincoln’s purposes to have had the war terminated at that time, because, in the first place, the abolition plot had not ripened, and, in the second place, his arrangements for retaining the presidency were not matured. He, therefore, sent a discourteous and foolish answer of rejection to Mr. Stephens’ request for an interview, knowing that such a course would so effectually disgust the southern people as to render any future advances on their part improbable. – At the same time, he instructed his organs to mislead the northern people by asserting that Mr. Stephens mission was of no political importance, having reference exclusively to an exchange of prisoners. But, in the course of time, the truth starts from its hiding place, and confronts the falsifier. We were sure, then, that Mr. Stephens came upon an errand of mercy, of humanity and patriotism, to appeal to the rulers of the north for negotiation with a view to the peaceable settlement of differences. His mission was one of peace, and for that reason was thwarted by Mr. Lincoln. In that, as in other things, the administration pursued a policy tending to exasperate the southern people and to prolong the war. To have held a conference with Alexander H. Stephens, upon whatever subject, would have disgraced no government and wronged no cause; for whatever his political creed may be, he is a statesman, a gentleman and an honorable, conscientious and right-hearted man. That we all know, and as such, he is the peer of the best in Washington. When he asked admission at the threshold of our council chambers, we must have known that no dishonorable motive brought him there; and when our chief magistrate turned his back upon him, he likewise turned away from a hope that was offering to heal the wounds of our poor country. In dictating the brief lines that denied the interview, he dictated the death warrant of hundreds of thousands of our countrymen whom Mr. Stevens would have spared, but whom Abraham Lincoln doomed to the slaughter-pens, that in their blood might be written the realization of his schemes.

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            → Some of the papers are discussing the relative merits of Fremont and Lincoln. There is some little difference. Fremont has two or three good things – free speech, free press, Monroe doctrine, the right of asylum. But there is not one good thing in Lincoln. He is total depravity. Both have reached the lowest depth of shame on the nigger question. Lincoln has touched the bottom of presidential meanness and infamy. Any change must necessarily be for the better.

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            → The Democratic party acts on the fundamental principle that this is a white man’s government, established to promote the general welfare of white men and their white posterity forever.

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Negro Troops.

            In all of Grant’s Virginia campaign, the negro troops have never been brought in cannon shot of the rebel lines. Neither were they in Banks’ late unfortunate expedition. What is the matter? Have experience taught that the negroes cannot be trusted in battle, or is it the programme to kill off the white soldiers first? Perhaps Lincoln hates to slaughter his “pet lambs.”

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            → A Nashville paper describes “debauchery” as an “epidemic” in the city. Before Nashville was possessed by the devil of Lincolnism, it was one of the most refined and moral cities in America. Now it is a pest house of vice and indecency.

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            → Hon. John S. Bailey will address the Democrats of Sciota township, at the center school house, on Saturday, June 25th, at 3 o’clock p. m.

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            Arrest of Joseph Adams. – This young man, who is charged with the murder of C. B. Coe, the pedlar, was arrested on Monday last. It seems that he had been hiding in the brush near Tennessee since the date of the murder, and would come out at night and retreat back before daylight. He was arrested by four citizens of Tennessee – N. B. Hardin, Sol. Parker, Thos. Cook, and another whose name we did not learn. Adams is now in jail where he will be held till his trial can be had in September.

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                → The elite of the young men in town enjoyed a grand fancy dress ball one night this week. Clerks, students, professional men and others of the son, to the number of thirty or more, graced the occasion with their smiling countenances, and showed the admiring demoiselles how to “trip it o’er the light fantastic too.” The female portion of the entertainment, if not so numerous, was more select, and probably made up in quality what was lacking in quantity. It was, we believe, a very happy affair, in which congenial spirits reached the highest enjoyment which virtuous minds, “on virtuous thoughts intent,” could attain. The fun and merriment rose fast and furious, but we believe none of them became so hotly engaged in the pleasures of the evening as to do, like Tam O’Shanter’s witch,

“Cast her duddles to the wark,
And link at it in her sark.”

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            → These bright, clear days are just the ones for obtaining good photographs, and Hawkins & Philpot’s gallery is just the place to get them in good style.

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            →The ordinance prohibiting the license of whisky shops will be of interest to the thirsty beverage seeking portion of our people.

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