June 17, 1864

Macomb Journal

FOR PRESIDENT,
ABRAHAM LINCOLN,
OF ILLINOIS.

FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
ANDREW JOHNSON,
OF TENNESSEE.

FOR GOVERNOR,
RICHARD J. OGLESBY, of Macon.

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR,
WILLIAN BROSS,of Cook.

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE,
SHARON LYNDALE,of St. Clair.

FOR AUDITOR OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS,
O. H. MINER,of Sangamon.

FOR STATE TREASURER,
JAMES H. BEVERIDGE, of De Kalb.

FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.
NEWTON BATEMAN, of Morgan.

FOR CONGRESSMAN AT LARGE,
S. W. MOULTON, of Shelby.

 ——————–

LINCOLN AND JOHNSON.

            We this week place at the head of our columns the names of the rail-splitter and tailor – Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. With such names to lead us during the coming campaign we will know no such word as fail. We voted for Lincoln in 1860, and we expect to support him in 1864 with double the pleasure we did then; and as for Andrew Johnson, the man who so nobly dropped party ties, and who refused to follow in the wake of treason in his native State, but bravely stood out against all the blandishments of the traitors with whom he had always associated, of course we will support heartily. He deserves such a reward as the Vice Presidency from the hands of the people and he will get it, in spite of what Fremont and his new friends, the copperheads, can do to prevent it.

 ——————–

Not Excitable.

            The copperhead papers all over the country are very much exercized about the Union men not getting up and making a loud hurrah over the re-nomination of Lincoln. The truth is, our party is one of stamina, and not all gas as the opposition is. We do not believe in making a great noise over the mere nomination of a man, but are, nevertheless, none the less resolute and determined to elect him. We shall show the cops how we get up excitements by our votes next fall; till then, we will rest easy without shouting ourselves hoarse about the nomination. Another reason is, the re-nomination of Abraham Lincoln was a fixed fact, gotten up by the people, who were determined that he should have the nomination, and the Convention at Baltimore merely assembled to ratify the desire of the people – that accomplished, they were at liberty to adjourn and go home and work for the ticket.

 ——————–

            Sensible to the Last. – The copperheads are debating the propriety of postponing their Chicago pow-wow till a later day with the expectation of “something turning up.” Well, it would be a good idea for them to wait till after the 8th day of next November.

 ——————-

FROM SPRINGFIELD.

            Springfield, Ill., June 11, 1864. – The Governor has been notified that the State of Illinois has credit for 2,257 volunteers for the three years’ service and thirty-two enlistments for the regular army, for the month of April, 1864. This does not include veteran re-enlistments.

A number of affrays occurred in the streets to-day between soldiers and citizens. Three men, whom the soldiers said were Copperheads, were badly pummeled, in the course of half an hour. This afternoon, the affair threatened to become general between the friends of these men and the soldiers, when the Provost guard appeared on the ground and quiet was restored.

Yesterday, an immense amount of Sanitary stores were shipped to Cairo by the Secretary of the Commission.

Lieut. Col. Hartman, of the 18th Illinois cavalry, has been honorably discharged.

 ——————

            – A detachment of 171 rebel prisoners arrived at Buffalo on Thursday, en route to Portsmouth, N. H., where they are to enter the United States navy, having taken the oath of allegiance and volunteered to fight for the old flag. About twenty of them are from Camp Douglas, Chicago, and the remainder from the Rock Island Military Prison.

 ——————-

            Plead Guilty. – The two young men who were arrested in this city several weeks since for having in their possession, and attempting to pass, counterfeit greenbacks of the denomination of $100, have plead guilty of the charge before the United States Court at Springfield. While here they gave the names of McWilliams and Brown, but since they acknowledge that they are Brothers, and that their name is Matheny. They formerly lived in the southeast corner of this county, near the village of Vermont. Sentence had not been passed on them when the Sheriff left Springfield, and therefore we cannot inform our readers what it is, but presume they will get what the “law allows,” in such cases made and provided. It is an inherent principle implanted in the human breast to have some sort of pity for a criminal, but when the crime touches our pockets, every spark of pity is put out, consequently these two young men will go to the place appointed for them “unwept and unsung.”

 ——————–

            Arrested. – Joseph Adams, the alleged murderer of Coe, the peddler, was arrested on last Monday morning in the creek bottom below Tennessee, by Messrs. N. B. Harden, Solomon Parker, J. F. Cook and G. W. Shanks, who had been on the watch for him for several days past. The gentlemen deserve great credit for the indefatigableness in making the arrest, having to watch in the brush for several nights before succeeding. They had reason to believe that Adams was still in the neighborhood somewhere, and were resolved to take him. Adams appeared to take the matter very coolly until he found he had to go to jail without a preliminary trial before a magistrate. Our worthy Sheriff was on board the train on his return from Springfield, when Adams was brought on, and immediately took him in charge and brought him safely through and lodged him in jail, where he will remain till the sitting of the next term of the Circuit Court.

 ——————–

            Another Runaway. – Last Sunday morning, about nine o’clock, the usual quiet of our streets on the Sabbath was disturbed by a span of ponies, belonging to a drunken pump peddler, running away with the wagon, spilling the peddler and another bottle of whiskey, besides all the other traps in the wagon, out on the ground. No damage done, except breaking the wagon tongue and smashing a gooseberry pie. – The smaller bottle of whisky came up all right, whereas the other one appeared to be very much rejoiced, and he lugged it to his mouth with great haste, after which he proceeded to make a short, dimocratic speech, the principle of which consisted in the abuse of Lincoln.

 ——————-

            Are We Going to Celebrate. – Last week we published a call for our citizens to meet at the Court House to make arrangements for suitably celebrating the 4th of July. Saturday came, and the citizens – staid at home. Now, the question is, shall those who wish to enjoy a holiday on that day have to go away from home to do it, or shall we still have a meeting and make arrangements yet? Citizens from different parts of the county would come to town on that day; if they could be assured that there was something going to be done beyond the ordinary every day transactions of business.

 ——————-

            The 4th at Bardolph. – We are requested to state the glorious 4th will be celebrated in a grove near the village of Bardolph. Everybody and his wife are invited to attend and bring their neighbors and their wives and little ones with them. Let no one forget to go, as the 4th only comes once a year.

 ——————-

            Will Have Work, Probably. – We see by dispatches in the dailies, that a large rebel force was marching on Memphis. If this report is true, the 137th 100 days men will probably have some work to do. We do not believe the prospect of a fight will have any very great terrors to the boys in that regiment; for, with the exception of a few under-aged boys, the regiment is made up of as good fighting material as ever went to war, and it is commanded by men of true grit. The rebs will find it harder work to take Memphis from us than it was for our forces to take it from them in the Spring of ’62.

 ——————–

            J. M. Browne & Co’s – Boot shoe hat and cap store, on the south side of square. This is not the first time we have spoken of this house, and we assure our friends and public generally that we should not again refer to them if we did not believe that by so doing we should benefit all that are in need of goods in their line, for we find by experience that they sell at smaller profits than any house the kind here. – Again we say to all in want of boots shoes or hats and caps, do not buy until you call and see their stock.

 ——————–

            Off for West Point. – John Farwell, a young gentleman of this city, having received the appointment of Cadet at West Point from the State at large, started for that place last Monday evening. The best wishes of his numerous friends go with him. We are sanguine that he will graduate from that institution with honor, and that he will yet make his mark in the world.

“We’ll all be gay
When Johnny comes marching home.”

 ——————–

            The City Supervisor. – Our new City Supervisor is displaying an energy, rarely seen in an official, in regard to his duty. With a full force of laborers, he is busily engaged in repairing and working the streets and alleys of our city. Our streets already present the appearance of having a man about who knows how roads should be worked, still he has great deal to do yet, — especially with the sidewalks.

 ——————–

            Frost. – There was considerable frost made its appearance near Rock Island this week, destroying the young corn to a considerable extent in the lowlands. We understand there was a light frost in this county on Sunday morning last, but not enough to materially damage anything.

 ——————–

            Sold Him. – We understand that Joseph Burton, Esq., has sold his fast trotting horse to Jacob Strader, of Chicago, for the sum of six hundred dollars. A good nice sum to be given for one horse, but if there is any one horse worth that sum, we think Joe. Burton’s horse is.

 ——————–

            Half Fare. – The Gen’l Superintendent of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy R. R., with his accustomed liberality, will reduce the fare on the road during the 4th of July and the morning trains of the 5th from all the stations on the road. This will be good opportunity for all to enjoy a ride that day cheap.

 ——————

            A Man Shot. – We learn from the Savannah, (Mo.) Plaindealer, that a man by the name Joseph Lanier was executed near that city, last week, by the military authorities for breaking his parole. Thus it should be. Our Government has been too lenient heretofore with those rebels.

 ——————-

            Removed. – Wright & Stradler have removed their boot and shoe store to the west side of the square in Campbell’s block, where they have more rooms to “spread themselves,” and display to a better advantage their immense stock of goods.

 ——————-

            → Squibob thinks Macomb has more handsome young ladies than any other town of its size this side of sundown, but he says when he meets two of them on our narrow sidewalks, they run him out in the mud or dust. Squibob had better be careful.

 ——————-

            Arrived Out. – Mich. Lipe and Ben. Naylor have arrived at the gold mines, and we hear are at work for wages at six dollars per day. Rather a falling off from the high expectations of some of the boys who started out there this Spring.

 ——————-

            “Of Course We Will.” – The the editor of the copperhead organ in this city is becoming facetious in his old age. He says the true Democratic ticket will be nominated at Chicago next month, and calls on us to fulfill our offer to vote that ticket, provided he does, “without evasion, quibbling, or subterfuge of any kind.” We said true Democratic ticket, and not a copperhead, mongrel thing, such as is sure to be nominated at Chicago. There’s no quibble about that. Abe Lincoln and Andy Johnson are the nominees of the true Democrats. Come right along, Mr. Eagle, and we will furnish you a nice ticket, printed on white paper, and not on yellow, as a certain party printed them a few years since.

 ——————-

            The Non-Vets of the 16th. – The boys of the 16th who did not re-enlist, belonging to this place, have been anxiously looked for, for the last week, but up to this date, (Monday, 13th,) have not arrived. When they do come we should give them a rousing reception.

 ——————–

            Not So. – We stated last week that the miners at Colchester had struck for higher wages. We see by the Quincy papers that it is not so, the miners only making a demand for more wages, was aceeded to by the employers. It is about the same thing in Dutch, though – coal is bound to come up anyhow.

 ——————–

            The Literary Society. – The Philomathi Society is still flourishing, and no doubt is accomplishing a great deal of good with our young men. Let them keep it going, and not get discouraged for trifles. We shall take occasion some evening to meet with them, and then we will be able to speak more at length of their doings.

 ——————–

            → We have heard several rumors that the 16th was at Springfield, waiting to be mustered out, but cannot get at anything positive in relation to it. The non-vets are anxiously looked for.

 ——————–

            → Our letter from Mr. Magie failed to reach us this week. He is with the advance of Sherman’s army, and we suppose has no opportunity to write. Look out for a good budget of news when it does come.

 ——————–

            1st Assistant Surgeon. – Our fellow townsman, Dr. W. H. Huston, we are gratified to learn, has received the appointment of 1st Assistant Surgeon in the 137th Reg’t. 100 days’ men. He has gone with the regiment to Memphis.

 ——————–

            Thanks. – We return our thanks to our M. C. from this district for continued favors.

 ——————–

            → Those wanting good waterproof roofs to their houses, would do well to call on J. W. McIntosh, of this city.

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