April 2, 1864

Macomb Eagle

Next Tuesday.

            The annual town elections come off next Tuesday. We trust it is not necessary to warn Democrats that they must vote their entire strength, or, in some of the townships at least, they will meet with a humiliating defeat. – The disunion republicans will be out in force, and they already boast that in some of the Democratic townships they will elect their ticket. The pride of every Democrat should be aroused to prevent this. Our enemies have made secret nominations, and hope to succeed by the trick of secret organizations. The Democrat who neglects to vote next Tuesday is unworthy of his birthright, because he will thereby imperil the cause of self-government and aid the efforts of those partizans who would destroy our liberties and erect a despotism in their stead.

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Their Own Argument.

            One of the favorite arguments of the amalgamation papers against General McClellan, is, that somebody whom they call copperheads (whatever that word may mean) wish to see him President. When not retailing some baseless slander, this is considered a knock-down argument. If they find any thing particularly objectionable in an opposition paper, it is quoted with a flourish and the exclamation, “that paper will support McClellan for the presidency,” as if that proved anything against the object of their dislike. Let us take their mode of argument and see what kind of man Lincoln is, judging him by the character of some of the company who are supporting him for re-election:

1. All the howling, bloodthirsty fanatics from Maine to California.

2. Every blaspheming infidel and atheist in the country.

3. The filthy practicers of the doctrine of miscegenation; every one of them.

4. Every idle and dissolute negro.

5. All the thievish shoddy contractors – the vultures who fatten on the public waste and offal of the state.

6. The army of corrupt office-holders.

7. The great stock gamblers, without exception.

8. All the speculators and extortioners who are running up prices at the expense of the poor.

9. The men who pay poor sewing-women starvation prices for work on army clothing.

10. The men who declare the “Constitution a league with death and a covenant with hell.”

11. All the men who boast that for years they have labored to destroy the Union.

12. All the men who declare that the Union is a thing of the past, hated and accursed, by every patriot.

The list might be extended indefinitely, but this sample is sufficient. – How do the republicans like this of their own argument?

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            → “You will never see again the nation late which you were born; the old-fashioned, calm, quiet, homely, home-bred, school-house farmer’s republic.” “You are to have a nation developed into a first rate military power.”

The above pretty extract from Wendell Phillips’ last speech tells the end of abolition rule. The days of the old fashioned republic are numbered, and the new military despotism is about to be inaugurated. But one chance remains to defeat the schemes of the conspirators. The election of Mr. Lincoln is necessary to their entire success. His defeat will give a new lease of life to the republic. Shall it be affected?

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Union League Catchism.

            The pious elders who run the union leagues in the interest of the African fetish are getting up a catechism for the juvenile members of their flocks. We suppose it will be something like the following:

What is the chief end of the loyal league?
The end of the Union.

What are States?
Colonies of the Federal Government.

What is a judge?
A provost-marshal.

What is a court of law?
A body of soldiers appointed by a General to try civilians without law.

What is a bastile?
A republican meeting house, for the involuntary assembling of men who believe in the Union as it was, and the Constitution as it is.

What is a President?
A general agent for negroes.

What is a Government?
A general agent for the President.

Are the people of the United States happy?
They are.

What do they live upon?
Chiefly upon blood.

What are Five Twenties?
Lincoln’s I. O. U.’s, made redeemable in Government strips of paper, in five or ternty years.

What is the meaning of the word ‘patriot?’
A man who loves his country less, the negro more.

Who is Garrison?
A friend of the President, who descended into hell, and found the original copy of the Constitution of the United States.

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            City Election. – The day is not distant when the people of Macomb will be called upon to elect municipal officers, and we think it time that some attention was being directed to the matter. Under the rule of the republicans who have managed things their own way for several years, the morals of our city have been, apparently, uncared for and vice and crime have increased to an amount that is absolutely alarming.

The citizens are paying heavy taxes, and they look in vain for any adequate return for their money, either in public improvements or in protection to person or property. The public schools have been conducted in a manner that has rendered them more of a nuisance then a benefit. Dens of intoxication and gambling have multiplied, and have gone unchecked in their trade, until the name of our town is becoming a byword and a reproach among the sober people of the country. Men drink and gamble away their earnings, with a reckless indifference of the misery they are surely bringing upon themselves and their families. Boys are seeing what others are doing and are rapidly learning the ways of vice and eventual crime. Can the parents, there interested in making men and not drunkards of their children, look upon these things with indifference? The present authorities have shown themselves utterly powerless, or utterly careless about many of the duties incumbent upon them. It were far better to shut up every whisky shop in town than longer to permit the sapping and destruction of virtue and manhood in our midst. We call upon the people to take this matter in hand, and either restrain the selling of whisky and all gambling for “the drinks,” or else prohibit the traffic entirely.

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            → The March term of the circuit court adjourned on Tuesday morning. A large amount of business was disposed of.

The most important civil case before the court was that of Lancaster vs. Homer, which occupied three days. The jury returned a verdict for the defendant.

Owen Manion, indicted for murder, was granted a continuance till the next term of the court, on account of the absence of a material witness.

John Harry and wife were sentenced to jail, one for four and the other for two months.

A large number of People’s cases were continued till the next term.

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            → We had a call this week from our handsome friend, J. M. Davidson, of the Carthage Republican. He looks well, which leads us to believe that the Carthagenians are doing well by him. Mr. D., by the way, is entitled to the credit of that union league music which we published last week. He has been known as a master of music heretofore, and has earned a good reputation in that line; but his talents as a composer must now be acknowledged by all, and on the exhibition of his genius will chiefly rest his fame.

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            → The union league music we published last week answers a double purpose: 1st, to show the niggerism of the league generally: and 2d to illustrate how emphatically the republicans have got “nigger on the brain.” The little fellows standing on their heads show precisely the “situation.”

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            → This week, the last of March, has been just about as ugly and disagreeable weather as the most inveterate hater of comfort could desire.

 ——————-

            → We have a letter from Mr. Naylor, written at Atchison, March 27th. He thought they would get off in about a week from that date.

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            → The promptness with which the Farmers’ and Merchants’ Insurance Company of Quincy pay their losses may be judged of by the following note:

To the editor of The Macomb Eagle:

On the 19th day of February 1864, my house and contents , insured by the Farmers’ and Merchants’ Insurance Company of Quincy, Ill., under policy No. [???] were totally destroyed by fire. The company, on being made acquainted with the fact, adjusted my loss and paid me in full, six hundred dollars being this amount insured.

Such prompt and immediate adjustment and settlement deserves [?] and notice, and I hereby recommend this company to all who, like myself, might meet with an accident.

T. Foster.

            Blandinville, March 31, 1864.

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            The Alton Democrat. – We value this as one of the spiciest and ablest Democratic papers that comes to our table. Its energy and ability are evidently appreciated by the Democracy of Alton and vicinity, as we notice it has recently been enlarged and otherwise improved. It is determined to keep pace with the demands upon its columns. We wish it unbounded success.

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            → The coolest people we know of are the newspaper patrons, who send you a few lines of advertisement, and accompany them with a yard or two of puffs which they request you to insert in the editorial columns gratis! This is like paying a shopkeeper for a pound of sugar and asking him to throw in a barrel of flour.

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            Civilizing the African. – Mrs. Frances D. Gage, in a recent address on the condition of the negroes on the sea cotton Island of South Carolina said that when she went there in 1862, they neither used profane language nor got drunk – these immoralities being confined to the military officers – but since the white man was introduced, and the intercourse between the two races had extended and become common, the contraband had arrived at a remarkable state of accomplishment in the gentlemanly qualifications of swearing and drinking whisky.

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