March 28 and 29, 1862

Macomb Journal
March 28, 1862

The Fulton Democrat.

            This traitorous sheet still lives to belch forth the treasonable sentiments of its editor.  The Democracy of Fulton county some time last year repudiated the concern, but it would appear they still yield it aid and comfort sufficient to keep it alive.  For some weeks past we have been inclined to think the editor had become somewhat mollified, and was willing to see the rebellion suppressed, but the late decisive victories of the Federal arms it would appear have stirred up his ire against the Government to a higher pitch than ever.  Of course his little sheet is harmless, so far as the Federal cause is concerned, but at the same time we cannot escape the reflection that the party which would sustain such a treasonable concern deserves the severest censure, and is unworthy the confidence of loyal men.

This Democrat, as the sheet is called, last week reiterates its conviction that the rebels will not be subjugated, and it warns the South that they may expect no justice while the Government is in the hands of Republicans.  It then says – “This knowledge will nerve the rebels to fight the question to the last.  Rather than submit, they will call upon some foreign power to take them under its protection, and the appeal will not be resisted a day.  Again, England and France cannot afford to do without cotton another year.  They are bound to interfere before many more months, let the cost to them be what it may.”

How anxious that traitorous doughty Democrat appears to be that the South should hold out a little longer.  And yet he professes to be loyal to our government.  That shows him to be a sneaking coward, as well as a traitor.

As might be expected this howling traitor pitches into the administration on account of the tax bill, and says:

“People will suffer such privation as they or their fathers have never known, and it will be happy for the thieving traitors of the North if the outraged and ruined masses do not rise up to throw off the heavy yoke put upon their necks by the fraud and imbecility of our rulers.”

What loyal man will not say this hound is not worthy of hemp.

Another extract –

“Although they (the South) are foes in as savage and relentless a war as the world has known for many years, we cannot deny them the meed of praise history will accord to them forever, for the manner in which they have thus far met the whirlwind of malace, wealth and power hurled upon them by the government.”

Here is the blunt declaration that the rebels deserve praise for their resistance to the government, and our neighbor of the Eagle joins hand with the editor of that sheet and calls him his “brother in the cause of Democracy and truth.”

——————–

            The Western men fight like heroes.  Old soldiers and new recruits are alike in earnest and almost equally efficient in the battle-field.  One of the regiments that stood the bravest and suffered the most at Fort Donelson had been organized less than a month, and was raw in everything but stern heroism.  The officers of these men have no doubt of their courage.  They know that at any hour they can be led against the enemy’s batteries.  No long period of preparation is required to make them fit to fight for their country.  And so the men gloriously justify the confidence of their leaders.

As yet, the great achievements of the war have mainly been the work of Western men.  Their advance reminds us of Mr. Webster’s saying that one of these days it would rain bullets down the Mississippi.  We trust, however, that the men of the East may soon have large opportunities to prove themselves of the same manly stock.  As the history of the conflict now stands, the glory of lofty daring and noble deeds for Freedom is not equally divided between the two sections. – N. Y. Tribune.

——————–

Macomb Eagle
March 29, 1862

Beauties and Blessings.

            The country is now experiencing the beauties of a republican administration and the blessings of a sectional triumph.  The safe and sure interpretation of the powers of our government, by which the country prospered so long and largely under Democratic rule, has been set aside to try new theories and to inaugurate fanatical ideas.  A little more than a year ago we were a prosperous and united nation.  But this prosperity would not suffice the aggressive fanatics, and by various means enough people were fooled into the accomplishment of a sectional triumph.  The result, as a contemporary says, is that eleven States have attempted to establish an independent government, and two others, divided in sentiment, have been devastated by hostile armies.  A civil war has been prosecuted of gigantic proportions.  The means and energies of the Government, which should have been devoted to the development of the vast resources of the country, have been wasted.  The two sections of the country are yet in hostile array.  A vast public debt has already been created, and which, under any circumstances, must be increased largely before the war is terminated, whatever may be the result.  The revenues have been diminished, and the ordinary expenditures, including the interest upon the public debt, doubled.  And as a finale a tax system is proposed which will lay a heavy hand upon the industry of the country – upon the producers and laborers.  Such is one year’s experience of republicanism. – Three years more of similar rule will make the public debt and public burdens greater than those of England, or of any of what we have termed the oppressed nations of Europe.  How long will the people submit to such an admin

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