January 3 and 4, 1862

Macomb Journal
January 3, 1862

The editors send their warmest greetings to all their readers, and hope the year we are just entering upon may be more prosperous and happy to them than the one which has just expired.  Let us hope that the New Year will witness the speedy overthrow of this gigantic conspiracy against our government, and when it shall be accomplished may it leave us purified by the furnace of affliction in which we have been tried, a re-united, a free, prosperous and happy people.

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Doughface Democrats. – Our country is still afflicted with a race of Doughface Democrats.  A few of them have succeeded in procuring positions as editors of Democratic newspapers.  We have one of the race in this town.  It is his forte to write about the [African-American] and abolition.  You may look in vain for an editorial that is not overflowing with the [African-American], or which is not filled with frothy declamations about abolitionists.  While he can prate constantly of abolition, he says nothing about Southern Treason.  What do these editors mean?  Do they mean that to be in favor of freedom is a crime; but to be opposed to “abolition” – that is, in favor of slavery, is to be in favor of liberty?  If they do, they are themselves traitors to freedom, to truth, to the constitution, to the Union; and as much deserve a traitor’s doom as the rebel taken in arms against his country.  Such men if only in Dixie’s land would make just as good traitors as Jeff Davis or Wigfall.

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Our Carrier Boy – Desires to return his sincere thanks to our town subscribers for the liberal manner in which they met him on New Year’s day, on the occasion of his presentation of his annual address; and he deems a special acknowledgement due to Mrs. Luther Johnson for a package of valuable  and acceptable presents, in addition to the silver quarter.  He expresses a hope that all his patrons may live to enjoy many New Year’s days.

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The C. P. Church, of this city, have procured the labors of Rev. Saml. Richards, and will, henceforth, have regular preaching every Sabbath.  There is a protracted meeting now in progress in their church.

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Railroad Accident. – A serious smash up occurred on Christmas Eve, on the C.B. & Q. Railroad, near Wataga.  A freight train standing on the main track was run into by a passenger train coming West, four or five cars smashed to pieces, and several passengers badly injured.  There were five persons from this county on the passenger train, and they were all more or less injured.

Mr. A. Abernathy, living near Table Grove, had an arm broken; A. Griffin, from El Dorado township, badly bruised; G. W. Wright, living near Vermont, had several ribs broken; N. Hepsley and James Hendricks were severely bruised and cut.  Some of the passengers still remain at Wataga, unable to be removed.  The blame rests upon the conductor of the freight train, who was occupying the track on the time of the coming passenger train.

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Fire. – On Wednesday of last week the house of J. Dilts in Canton, Fulton county was destroyed by fire.  Loss of about $300 – no insurance.  The furniture was saved.

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A Fowl Deed. – A lady residing at Ellisville, Fulton county, about a year ago, lost a two and a half dollar gold piece, and accused her servant girl of stealing it.  A few days since she sold a chicken to one of her neighbors, in the gizzard of which was found the missing coin.  What a commentary on “rash judgements.”  That chicken had an eye to business; was probably “laying up for a rainy day.”

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Macomb Eagle
January 4, 1862

English and American Abolitionism

The New York Evening Journal (Thurlow Weed’s paper) of a late date says:

“The Earl of Shaftesbury recently remarked to a gentleman who had a conversation with him on American affairs: I, in common with almost every English statesman, sincerely desire the rupture of the American Union.  It has been the policy of England to brook no rivalry, especially in the direction of her own greatness.  We justly fear the commercial and political rivalry of the United States. – With a population of thirty millions now, they will soon, if not checked, overshadow Great Britain.  We cannot look upon such a monstrous growth without apprehension.”

This Earl of Shaftesbury is a leading man among the gang of abolitionists in England.  His remarks are suggestive of the source of our troubles.  The abolitionists of England have seized upon the negro slavery of the southern States as the great lever with which to divide the American Union.  These English abolitionists organized abolition societies in the United States – they filled the minds of the people with falsehoods about slavery, and with their continued agitation of the question, aided by reckless demagogues among us, they at length succeeded in organizing a powerful political party.  The people of this country, who were thus abolitionized, became the dupes of British efforts to destroy our Union.  The republican party fell in with the views of these abolitionists on the slavery question, only sugar-coating the pill to conceal its nauseousness, and to aid in its general adoption.  It is a sober fact that England’s jealousy of our greatness and her determination to weaken if not destroy the American republic, has led to the rise of the abolition party in this country.  This party has, with great fidelity and too much success, carried out the wicked schemes that were conceived across the water.  They have sown jealously and hatred between the North and the South; they have divided churches in their attempts to be conscience-keepers for their brethren; they have nullified the laws of Congress, which assured to southern people their rights; they have trampled upon the Constitution, which recognizes the rights of one section equally with the other, and at last they succeeded in obtaining the administration of the government upon the grand plea that “slavery must be placed in course of ultimate extinction.”  They refused all efforts at peaceable adjustment, but chose the arbitrament of the sword rather than discard an unconstitutional rule of action.  A rebellion against the government – the most stupendous that history makes mention of – is the consequence.  The Republic, if not divided and destroyed, is at least burdened with heavy debts, its material growth is checked, its power is shorn, and its people afflicted with calamities that were undreamed of before. – The abolition party is primarily responsible for all these sad and distressing consequences.  Had there been no such party, there would have been no secession in the South, no rebellion, and no war.  England now chuckles at the accomplishment of her long-cherished schemes, and gloats over the ruin of our country.  But for the wickedness of politicians, who could see the country destroyed by fanaticism, rather than preserved through a pure Democratic patriotism, we should be at peace among ourselves, and continue in our former unexampled career of national greatness and private prosperity.  We are indebted to English jealousy, to abolition fanatics, to republican politicians, and villainous demagogues generally for all our troubles and calamities.  The first step toward recovering our former prosperity is to hurl the imbecile and corrupt politicians out of Congress and out of power.

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Canada Grass.

The Montreal advertiser says that agents of the American government are purchasing thousands of tons of hay in Canada, and shipping it to Washington.  On behalf of western farmers, we should like to know why the government money cannot be used at home, especially as there are millions of tons of hay in the West now awaiting a market.

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We have repeatedly advised our people not to take eastern bank paper in payment for produce.  A general suspension of the banks has commenced, and those who have not taken our advice will no doubt be very sorry.

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From all accounts we can get the rebels were greatly enraged at the arrest of Mason and Slidell.  They now appear to be equally wrathy at the release of these worthies.

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