November 8 and 9, 1861

Macomb Journal November 8, 1861

  • A few weeks since we made a proposition to those in arrears that if they would pay us within 30 days with one year’s subscription in advance, we would cancel our claims at advance rates.  The 30 days will expire on Monday next, and we now give fair notice that after that day we shall abide strictly by our rules, and we trust no one will ask from us any deviation.

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To the Loyal Women of America.A recommendation has issued from a Department of the Government at Washington, that they unite in every neighborhood in suitable organizations for the purpose of raising such contributions as may be needed to alleviate the necessities of the sick and wounded in our armies.  A meeting for this purpose, of the ladies of Macomb, is called to meet at Campbell’s Hall, on Wednesday next, at 10 o’clock, A.M.  Let all who feel an interest in the cause be present.

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Gone East. – Our worthy Circuit Clerk, J. B. Cummings, Esq., started on Wednesday morning for a brief visit to Pennsylvania, his native state.

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Election Day. – Everything passed off on election day with unusual quietness.  There were no crowds, no disputations, and no excitements.  In accordance with the new election law, the doors of the liquor shops were generally closed – that is, they were latched, but could be easily opened from the outside as usual, and those who wanted a dram could purchase it if they had the money.  There was not, however, any drunkenness to be seen, or any disturbance worthy of notice.

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Cabbages. – One of the candidates who graced the Democratic ticket which was elected on Tuesday, owns, or has some sort of claim to a small patch of ground contiguous to this city, which is occupied and cultivated by an old man on shares, or for the halves.  The old man this year raised just 30 cabbages, 15 of which of course belonged to the candidate aforesaid.  Now this candidate was very eager to be elected, and knowing the importance of one vote, his thoughts were directed to the old man in question, who was a true-blue Union man, and was not supposed to have very much sympathy for men who could flippantly declare this war to be “a d – d Black Republican war.” – Hence, this eager candidate felt persuaded that to secure the man’s vote, he must do the handsome thing; so a day or two before the election he seeks the old man’s habitation – nobody at home but the old lady – candidate compliments her on her fine and youthful appearance – tells her he is up for office – the old man will of course vote for him – says old man – and about those cabbages – (and here the candidate smiled a most pleasant and benevolent smile) – and about those cabbages – “tell the old man he can keep the whole of them!”  The old man voted for the Union ticket, and has laid up just fifteen cabbages.

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Tennessee Township. – We hear good complaints of the overbearing and manifest partiality of the Democratic judges of the election in Tennessee township.  Volunteers in the army who have resided in that township for years, who happened to be home on election day, were refused a vote on the ground of a change of residence, they having gone away to fight the battles of the country.  A man by the name of Wilson, who has resided with his family in that township for a number of years, was denied a vote because he had been to California, although his family remained and was supported by regular remittances from him.

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                                    Acknowledgement St. Joseph, Mo., Oct. 29th, 1861. Messrs Editors: — The Medical Department of the 16th regiment of Illinois Volunteers, through Lieut. Broaddus, have received a box containing quilts, pillows, socks, and other articles for the use the Regimental Hospital, contributed by Mrs. J. L. N. Hall and other ladies of Macomb.  As such contributions are duly appreciated, I desire in behalf of the sick in Hospital to make public acknowledgement of their gratitude to Mrs. Hall and the other ladies who have thus kindly been mindful of their comfort.  It is by such donations we are continually reminded of the sympathy which exists among the ladies of Illinois for the soldiers who have left their homes and friends to endure hardships, to suffer sickness and to fight for their betrayed country. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon the faithful soldiers, nor too much upon those who at a distance sympathize with them and act. You will therefore please assure the ladies of your city that the articles they contributed were appropriate, and that their gift is gratefully received.  The blessings of the sick rest upon them. Respectfully, L. WATSON, Surgeon, 16thReg. Ill. Vol.

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Macomb Eagle November 9, 1861 Industry Township. Among the many localities where the Democrats have gained at the late election, no one stands more noticeable than Industry township.  Last year, owing to the importation of republican vagabonds from Schuyler county this township was made to count out a majority for the republican ticket.  The Democrats were convinced that this result was a gross fraud, and they have maintained their organization, and with the energy of men determined to be avenged for the outrages committed upon them, they have worked faithfully and defiantly too in behalf of truth and justice.  They have this year nobly triumphed, and that too by a majority unheard of before.  They have beat the republicans sixty votesall around.  This is a glorious victory, and well may our Industry friends feel proud of it.  A number of those who voted the republican ticket last year, it is believed, have nobly contributed to this result.  All honor to them for joining the friends of the country and voting against open and covert abolitionists.  Industry, too, is another place where Democrats were threatened with being mobbed, for daring to criticize the acts of the administration.  Mobocrats and abolitionists will please take warning.  In view of all the circumstances we may say of Industry, “many daughters have done virtuously, but thou excellest them all.”

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                        Obituary. It is our melancholy duty to announce the death of “No Party.”  The deceased was born on the 3rd day of October; and died on the 5thof November.  It had no great amount of vitality – had neither hair on its head nor teeth in its mouth, and was a puny thing from the first.  It was wrapped in wool and carefully nursed by a few hopeful youths.  But it came to no good.  November’s frosts cut it down like an ill weed.  We have not been favored with the arrangements for its burial; but we presume the Journal editors will be the grave-diggers; Hendee and Cruser will act as pall-bearers; Damon will head the procession as herald; elder Van Vleck will be chief mourner and will administer “moral” consolation to the friends and relatives; the republican committee and little boys will fill the carriages, and Brattle will see that the corpse is deposited at “the right corner.” – Over the grave will be erected the figure of a “[African-American] couchant,” and this inscription will be printed in black: “If I am so soon done for, I wonder what I was begun for.”

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A Few More Christians. – Our old friend Davis Hardin, of Emmet, has laid us under obligations for a lot of cabbage and beets – a very seasonable and acceptable gift.

  • Mr. E. S. Smith, of Sciota, presented to us a lot of the largest turnips and beets that we have ever seen.  One of the latter weighed nineteen and a half pounds!  This beats all the beets that have heard of this year.  It had the Sciota prairie to grow in, though.
  • Mrs. Palmer, of Emmet – we don’t know which one of them – has our thanks for jar of most excellent apple butter and a sack of fine apples.
  • To Mr. John Finney we are indebted for two sacks of potatoes.  To show the size of these “murphies,” we will state that one of them weighed two and a half pounds, and a number of others two pounds each.  If any body can beat that lot we should like to hear of it.

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Sorghum Syrup. – It is the desire of many of our citizens to know how many gallons of syrup have been made in McDonough county from the Chinese sugar cane this season.  The information is important, on account of the usual supply of molasses being cut off by a very little trouble.  We have prepared a schedule, and all persons making sorghum syrup are requested to report to us, either verbally or by letter, the number of gallons of syrup they have made this year.  We trust that every one will report without delay.

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Harvey T. Gregg, well known to the people of this county, has joined a company in Ingersoll’s cavalry regiment, and been promoted to a Lieutenancy.  Mr. Gregg is one of those Democrats whom the republicans have persistently denounced as a secessionist and traitor, and he has even been threatened with a visit from a mob of abolitionists.  He goes to the war, while his assailants and villifiers keep out of the range of secession bullets.

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We understand that a lady of Bushnell (whose name we did not learn), while going to visit her brother at Lewistown, on Tuesday of last week, had her arm broken by a falling limb.

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The high winds of last week did considerable damage by blowing over haystacks and cornshocks and scattering corn from off the stalks.

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