February 9, 1861

Macomb Eagle

We understand that some good persons seriously fear that we are advocating the cause of the southern secessionists.  We think an enemy must have put the thought into their heads.  We dislike southern secession as much as we do northern abolitionism.  Both are obnoxious to the peace of the country, the welfare of human liberty, and the perpetuity of the American Union.  But abolitionism is the greater transgressor; because it began its wickedness, and instituted the process of hatred and alienation, first.  We trust that both may be condemned and crushed out by the people of their respective sections.  We have recognized the facts of secession, as they have occurred, and while deploring them, we have advised for a peaceful solution of the troubles.  We advise so still, and claim the highest promptings of patriotism and humanity for our defense.  The promise is to “the peace-makers” – not to those who “take the sword.”

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–          Pearson’s gallery is the headquarters for obtaining portraits.  All work well done, pictures true to nature, and charges moderate.  Call and see.

–          Mr. Campbell offers a valuable farm for sale.  It adjoins our town, is good land, and worthy the attention of any one who desires to purchase.

–          Our country friends, who want to get shaved smooth and nice, or get their hair cropped, when they come to town, will please call at Mr. Falder’s shop, north side of the square.  It is astonishing how handsome he can make an ugly man look.  S’fact!

–          The Illinois Legislature has been mostly occupied with local bills this week.  Senator Mack’s finance bill – which is the grossest violation of the Constitution ever undertaken by unscrupulous demagogues anywhere – was put through both houses, under the lash of party drill.

–          Our town will be well supplied with ice next summer.  Lane, Ervin, and perhaps others, have laid in a large quantity – enough to enable all our feverish politicians to keep cool.  The ice is of excellent quality, and warranted to mix well with cream, lemons; bourbon, and other tipular concoctions.

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The Growth of the West.

The returns of the census of 1860 which have been made public reveal a growth of population in our western States that is unexampled in history.  In ten years six States – to wit Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Iowa and Wisconsin – have increased from less than four millions to nearly eight.  – They have besides this, peopled Minnesota, an entirely new state, and thrown a few hundred thousand people into the Pike’s Peak Region, Washington Territory, and Oregon.  They have built more miles of railway than there are in all the rest of this Union; and, if New York and Pennsylvania be omitted from the comparison, we will venture to say that they have more cities, better hotels, school houses, and churches, than all the rest of the country together.  The men still live who remember to have walked over the bare prairie where Chicago now rears her splendid face; unless present appearances are very deceptive indeed, many of us who read these lines will live to see Chicago the most populous city on the continent.

For eight millions of working people are a mighty fact.  Much has been said and written about the delinquency of the West in the matter of debts.  No doubt Wisconsin has something to answer for in the way of stay-laws and repudiated mortgages: some other States, too, will need by-and-by, to clear their record of certain laws and legal proceedings of the hard times.  But it must be remembered that the West relies solely for subsistence on its crops and that they really had not a good crop there between 1856 and 1860.  Two good crops in the West enable a man to pay for his land.  Two bad crops make him bankrupt.  The creditors of the West will get good news from there this Spring.

Eight millions of free, intelligent, reading people are a fact which overrides a legion of minor drawbacks and temporary checks.

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